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Men's Health UKMen's Health UK

Men's Health UK

September 2019

Men's Health is the UK's best-selling quality men's magazine packed with expert tips and advice on everything today's man needs to feel fitter, healthier, and happier. Every month Men's Health delivers the inside track on the subjects that matter most to men. Naturally there's fitness, weight loss and general health plus the best advice on food, nutrition and meal plans. The award-winning Men's Health also delivers the very best in sex and relationships, gear, style, grooming, travel and wealth. Small steps, big results: It's an essential read for any man who wants to make his life better without turning his world upside down.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hearst Magazines UK
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11 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
the expert panel

TOM BARTON BURGER MAGNATE A burger may be a simple pleasure, but perfection demands smart tweaks. Let Honest Burgers’ Barton show you the way JAY WATTS CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST Has rampant individualism scarred a generation of young people? Watts traces our economic model’s toll on mental health MARTIN LETOURNEUR PRO PADDLE-BOARDER Nike Swim paddle-boarder Letourneur delivers a sink-or-swim crash course on an intense team sport making waves this summer PATRICK HUGHES STYLE HISTORIAN Camouflage is no longer about blending in, but standing out. And, as Hughes explains, it’s a look that’s built to last TOM BRADY NFL QUARTERBACK Learn from the GOAT. Brady has won more Super Bowls than anyone and now, at 42, he reveals his playbook on how to stay at the top JOHNNY LEE CARDIOLOGIST It can be tough to know when to follow your heart. Luckily, Lee’s expertise on HRV training means you won’t…

access_time2 min.
men's health uk

EDITOR IN CHIEF TOBY WISEMAN DEPUTY EDITOR DAVID MORTON CREATIVE DIRECTOR DECLAN FAHY STYLE DIRECTOR ERIC DOWN PHOTO DIRECTOR VICI CAVE EDITORIAL BUSINESS MANAGER RACHAEL CLARK FEATURES EDITOR SCARLETT WRENCH ART EDITOR JESSICA WEBB ART DIRECTOR WILLIAM JACK PICTURE EDITOR SARAH ANDERSON COMMISSIONING EDITOR (PRINT AND DIGITAL) TED LANE CHIEF SUBEDITOR YO ZUSHI DEPUTY STYLE EDITOR SHANE C KURUP STYLE ASSISTANT RICCARDO CHIUDIONI SENIOR SUBEDITOR JUSTIN GUTHRIE DIGITAL EDITOR ROBERT HICKS DEPUTY DIGITAL EDITOR ED COOPER SOCIAL MEDIA AND CONTENT MANAGER JOY EJARIA JUNIOR DIGITAL WRITER DANIEL DAVIES EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES: CONTACT@MENSHEALTH.CO.UK MANAGING DIRECTOR, MEN’S LIFESTYLE, HEALTH AND FITNESS ALUN WILLIAMS ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER STEVEN MILES BRAND DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR JANE SHACKLETON SENIOR MARKETING EXECUTIVE PHILIPPA TURNER CLIENT DIVISION MANAGING DIRECTOR, BEAUTY JACQUI CAVE MANAGING DIRECTOR, LUXURY AND FASHION JACQUELINE EUWE DIRECTOR OF SPORT AND HEALTH ANDREA SULLIVAN DIRECTOR OF TRAVEL DENISE DEGROOT DIRECTOR OF MOTORS JIM CHAUDRY CLIENT MANAGER, FITNESS VICTORIA SLESSAR DIRECTOR OF FINANCE PETER CAMMIDGE CLIENT DIRECT DIRECTOR, HEALTH AND LIFESTYLE NATASHA…

access_time2 min.
editor’s letter

The issue you are holding concerns, among other things, age. I confess that this thought has only just occurred to me as I sat down to write, but that in itself is not altogether unsurprising. Age is something we’ve been discussing with increasing regularity in the Men’s Health office, and not just because we’ve all become a bunch of grizzled old duffers. Far from it: admittedly, a couple of us may be racking up excess miles on the clock, but we had already left school by the time our newest recruit was even born. The fact is our readership is broader in span than it has ever been. When we recently ran a feature called Fit At Any Age, the majority of letters I subsequently received were from disgruntled sexagenarians who…

access_time2 min.
ask mh

THE BIG QUESTION Q I’M CARRYING A LITTLE MORE WEIGHT THAN I USED TO. SHOULD I BE WORRIED ABOUT DIABETES? JOHN, GOSPORT Well, that depends on what you mean by “a little” – but you’re right to be thinking about it. The latest statistics indicate that we are edging towards a diabetes epidemic. Despite this, it seems that few grasp the severity of the condition. Diabetes causes glucose to build up in your blood, damaging your eyes, kidneys, sex life and, eventually, your heart. A slight increase in weight is no cause for panic, but carrying excess fat around your middle – along with poor sleep and high stress levels – will increase your risk. Sound like you? Get checked for pre-diabetes: elevated blood sugar levels that affect one in three adults in the…

access_time2 min.
ask mh

TEXT A SLEEP THERAPIST Today 02:03 It’s just gone two, and I need to be up for work in five hours. Can you help me nod off? OK. First, stop checking the time: studies show that knowing how much sleep you’ve missed will make you feel more tired. Right. I’ve turned the alarm clock around. What now? Your brain needs to associate “bed” with “sleep”. Don’t spend too long lying there awake. So, you mean I should get up? Yes, for 15 minutes. Stop all that tossing and turning and read a book in the living room. Can I watch an episode of Killing Eve? No! Avoid screens and keep the lights dim. Good luck. Today 02:58 Um, are you still awake? Yes… Count down from 900 in sevens: dull tasks like this often work. And get off your phone! Alison Gardiner sleepstation.org.uk AG ANCIENT…

access_time2 min.
your passport to laid-back longevity

As you struggle to meet work deadlines and family commitments, finding time to get the old gang back together can all too easily slip down your priorities list. Gratifyingly, however, US scientists have found that it’s precisely what you need. Spending time away with your friends – golfing in the Algarve, say, or coasteering in Jersey (see page 103) – can positively impact on your health as much as getting enough sleep and exercise. What’s more, taking regular breaks with your mates can increase your life expectancy. How much more of an excuse do you need? According to the Harvard Medical School, fostering social connections helps to dial down harmful levels of stress, which can cause problems for your immune system, coronary arteries, gut function and insulin regulation. And while talking…

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