EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / News & Politics
Newsweek EuropeNewsweek Europe

Newsweek Europe

03/22/2019

This exciting weekly publication offers a clear combination of news, culture and thought-provoking ideas that challenge the smart and inquisitive. Our promise is to put the reporting back into the news.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Newsweek UK Ltd
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
BUY ISSUE
$7.60(Incl. VAT)
SUBSCRIBE
$61.37(Incl. VAT)
51 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
the archives

1969 During the first moon landing, the nation was fixated on one man: Neil Armstrong, the pilot who had, just three years before, saved the Gemini 8 mission and the $24 billion space program from disaster (see Page 22). At a time of immense upheaval, America needed a hero and Armstrong was it. Described as “quiet and diffident,” he was characteristically self-effacing when Newsweek asked about his role in the Apollo 11 mission: “If historians are fair,” said Armstrong, who died in 2012 at 82, “they’ll recognize that this landing is only one small part of a large program.” 1974Impeachment rumors are common now, but in 1974 even discussing a president’s forceful removal was rare. The House of Representatives had voted only once to impeach: Andrew Johnson in 1868…

access_time1 min.
fighting to the finish

An explosion ripples across the war-torn town of Baghouz on March 3. Battered by Kurdish-led forces and U.S. warplanes, hundreds of outgunned jihadis surrendered a few days later, as fighting continued in the final patch of territory held by the Islamic State militant group (ISIS).…

access_time1 min.
double trouble

A man hoists debris at the crash site of Nairobi-bound Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 on March 10. All 157 people, from 35 nations, were killed. At press time, the cause of the crash was not determined, but it was the second time in a year that the newest version of the 737 Max 8—Boeing’s most popular jet—crashed minutes after takeoff; last October, 189 people were killed in Indonesia. Several international airlines have grounded their 737 Max 8 fleets.FILIPPO MONTEFORTE/AFP/GETTY; DELIL SOULEIMAN/AFP/GETTY; MICHAEL TEWELDE/AFP/GETTY…

access_time8 min.
out for justice

DOUG JONES WAS JUST 9 YEARS OLD WHEN Ku Klux Klan members bombed the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. The 1963 blast killed four young girls and helped focus the nation’s attention on the dangerous struggle for civil rights in the Deep South.Growing up in Fairfield, just outside the city, Jones has vivid memories of Governor George Wallace standing in the doorway at the University of Alabama to prevent black students from entering, a racist act that reportedly inspired Robert Chambliss, one of the bombers, to commit the crime.Nearly 40 years later, as a United States attorney for the Northern District of Alabama, Jones prosecuted Thomas Edwin Blanton Jr. and Bobby Frank Cherry for their roles in the bombing. The delayed justice for the families of the…

access_time12 min.
mission improbable

THE PLANS WERE READY; THE $250,000 payoff cash was committed. On December 10, 2018, a former Air Force intelligence officer named Bob Kent was planning to board a plane in New York for the Middle East on a most improbable secret mission: freeing Robert Levinson from Iran.Levinson, an ex–FBI agent well into a second career as a private detective, had disappeared over a decade earlier from a hotel on Iran’s Kish Island. He had been seen only twice since then, first in a hostage video his family received from unknown intermediaries in 2010, and three years later in photos showing the then-63-year-old increasingly haggard and begging for help.At first, the U.S. government claimed it had no knowledge of why Levinson, an expert on Russian organized crime, had gone to…

access_time14 min.
top flight

ROCKET MEN Armstrong, also opposite, and Scott board Gemini 8 on March 16, 1966. Though they expected challenges, they didn't know they would be pushed to the limits of their abilities just to survive. IN JULY, THE WORLD WILL MARK 50 YEARS SINCE NEIL ARMSTRONG and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin became the first humans to walk on the moon. But this month marks the anniversary of an almost-forgotten mission that, but for the skill of the astronauts on board, could have become a spectacular disaster for NASA. Author James Donovan tells the story in this excerpt adapted from his new book, Shoot for the Moon: The Space Race and the Extraordinary Voyage of Apollo 11.BY MARCH 1966, THE GEMINI PROGRAM, DESIGNED TO PERFECT techniques that would be required…

RECENT ISSUES

help