EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Hunting & Fishing
Petersen's Bowhunting

Petersen's Bowhunting August 2019

Petersen's Bowhunting is the source for the tactics, tools, and techniques necessary for successful bowhunting. Get practical shooting tips and useful information on archery, equipment tests, clothing, and product evaluations.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
KSE Sportsman Media, Inc.
Frequency:
Monthly
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10 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
just shoot it!

Like many archers, I find shooting in front of a crowd a bit unnerving. So, there was certainly a butterfly or two in my gut this June when I stepped up to the first target of the MTN OPS course at the Total Archery Challenge tour stop in Pennsylvania. With a packed practice range just a stone’s throw to my right and a busy vendor area behind me, there was nowhere to hide. And waaaay up the hill in front of me — 77 yards away, according to my rangefinder — a stone sheep 3-D target stood broadside. Geez, nothing like starting us off with a chip shot, I thought sarcastically as I adjusted the yardage dial on my sight. Taking a deep breath, I came to full draw, anchored, settled my pin…

3 min.
relax your bow arm

As a professional archer for the last 13 years, I’ve experienced almost every up and down this sport has to offer. As a result, I’m constantly going back to the basics, relearning techniques that I’ve proven countless times over. However, there are some things that aren’t so basic, that most people are never taught and that, quite honestly, don’t work for everyone. For some, though, they can be game-changing. For example, something that works well for me is remembering to relax my bow arm while aiming. Some days, my pin never moves and I think I’ve figured this game out; the next, I wake up and aim like I just drank a triple shot of espresso. I normally would just write this off as a bad day and hope for a better…

7 min.
are you throwing money in the dirt?

During my 17 years as a consulting wildlife biologist working with whitetail deer, I have never been more excited about a new management tool than I am right now. Those who read my column regularly know I am a huge proponent of developing and managing high-quality, year-round food sources for deer, a process I refer to as “regenerative wildlife agriculture.” This habitat-enhancement effort has had the greatest positive impact, by far, on the quality of the deer-management programs I’ve been a part of. These programs are scattered across the whitetail’s range and represent properties from just a few acres to several thousand. If you get at least five inches of rain a year and the sun shines, food plots will change your game. And if I only had time to…

5 min.
my three best shooting tips

I have received many good tips during the 40 years I have been shooting a bow. This issue, I’ll share my three favorites in hopes they help you as much as they’ve helped me. Eliminate Variables One of the most memorable shooting tips I ever got came from fellow Field Editor (and world-champion target shooter) Randy Ulmer back in the late ’90s. His simple advice put everything into proper perspective. Randy said, “Any method is good form if you can repeat it exactly the same way every time you shoot.” Unfortunately, being perfectly repetitive is hard to do without focusing on eliminating the source of the variable. Randy’s tip was simple: Look for anything that can change from one shot to the next and then find ways to eliminate the chances of that…

3 min.
western bowhunting sights

If you’re planning to hunt out West, it isn’t realistic to think you’ll get within 20 yards of a muley buck, let alone a bighorn sheep or antelope. You’ll rarely ease that close to anything in open country, so you need to be able to shoot accurately well beyond that distance. What we older nimrods considered a “long shot” 40 years ago is now a chip shot for skillful Western bowhunters. Veteran mountain hunters, for instance, know they have to be accurate to at least 40 or 50 yards if they want a reasonable chance of success. And in order to shoot that far with consistency, you need a quality bowsight! 10 Needed Features When I started bowhunting the Rockies in the ’70s, sights were fairly rudimentary. The first sights I used were…

3 min.
cool new crossbow accessories

Last issue, we heard from pro shop owners about trends in the crossbow industry. One they mentioned is that new hunters tend to buy package crossbows, but as they gain experience and knowledge, they come back to upgrade their accessories. With that being said, let’s take a look at a few of the latest crossbow accessories. Several years ago, the compound bow went on a diet, tapering down to small-diameter arrows. The crossbow industry has been slow to follow suit, partly because most crossbows only accept standard-diameter shafts (shooting anything smaller risks damaging the crossbow). Barnett has addressed this dilemma with its new HyperFlite bolts ($54.99 per three; barnettcrossbows.com ), designed specifically for use with Barnett’s Hyper series of crossbows. Hyper-Flite bolts have a .204-inch diameter, are 22 inches long and…