Alternatives Journal (A\J - Canada's Environmental Voice) of Canada

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Alternatives Journal Issue 40:5

Alternatives Journal provides critical and well-researched analysis of environmental issues in the clear, comprehensible style of a magazine. Issues are thematically focused, presenting in-depth exploration of specific topics like water conservation, climate change, green energy, sustainability, waste reduction and much more.<br><br>Back issues cover the history of the environmental movement.

Country:
Canada
Language:
English
Publisher:
Alternatives Journal (A\J - Canada's Environmental Voice) of Canada
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IN THIS ISSUE

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going coastal

CANADA IS RICH in natural capital, notably water. In this issue, we travel from coast to coast to coast to examine fresh- and salt-water-related initiatives that are making waves and inspiring change in our resource-blessed country and beyond. On the East Coast, Susan Holtz explores the latest efforts to harness the Bay of Fundy’s magnum tidal power (p.36), while on the North Coast, Alex Speers-Roesch outlines the global push to create an Arctic Sanctuary (p.32) similar to the ocean sanctuary now in place around Antarctica. And in “Secrets of the Salt Marsh” Lisa Szabo-Jones shows us the hidden beauty in these unique, salt-tolerant ecosystems at the edge of land and sea. Dig into her photo essay starting on page 24. In our cover feature, Andrew Reeves’ exploration of the Asian carp invasion…

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a\j creators

Lisa Szabo-Jones grew up in a seaside town in British Columbia’s lower mainland, and spent much of her youth wading among eelgrass seeking out Dungeness crabs, flatfish, bullheads, and sand dollars. Nowadays, she returns to this area to comb the shoreline for beach glass and butter agate, as well as continuing her attempts to access and photograph salt marshes, as she’s done on the East Coast in this issue of A\J. Szabo-Jones’ words share the limelight on page 24. What’s your favourite coastal memory? “Snorkelling terrifies me, but oddly scuba diving does not. I think it is because of the exposed belly, and not being able to see what’s coming up under, plus the residue of 1970s horror films about vengeful fish and killer whales. And, estimating that fish aren’t as…

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best of 2014

Maps are where it’s at Major Oil Pipelines Where and how much crude oil and bitumen moves around North America. Fracking Hotspots New updates on Canada’s shale gas formations, key water aquifers, fracking wells and moratoriums. First Places A baker’s dozen of trailblazing sustainable communities. Hidden Streams How water moves around the world, embedded in commodities – particularly food. ajmag.ca/blogs 5 Lessons from the Keystone XL Fight How to apply what we’ve learned from Keystone XL to Energy East. Alberta’s Wacky Museums The eccentric museums of the prairies have a lot to teach us about sustainability. Greening the Silver Screen What the film industry is doing tocurb its consumption. ajmag.ca/holidayguide A\J’s Winter Holiday Survival Guide DIY & low-impact gift ideas that are easy on your budget and the environment. Indoor and outdoor winter activities for kids – and kids at heart. How to…

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letters to the editor

No Favour There are many excellent arguments to be made in favour of solar power and against nuclear. Unfortunately, Jim Harris [“The UnAtomic Age,” A\J 40:4] has made none of them. Moreover, there are gaps in the author’s logic large enough to hide a lifetime of nuclear waste. Harris seems to conflate electricity and energy (an important distinction) when talking about solar vs. nuclear. The ‘solar vs. nuclear’ thrust of the article is also puzzling, since there’s no particular reason to think – nor does the author present any arguments – that one would come at the expense of the other. And not to belabour the point, but the comparison of solar power and cell phones is, frankly, a little bizarre. Cell phone use may have grown exponentially, but it’s a major leap…

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letters to the editor

No Favour There are many excellent arguments to be made in favour of solar power and against nuclear. Unfortunately, Jim Harris [“The UnAtomic Age,” A\J 40:4] has made none of them. Moreover, there are gaps in the author’s logic large enough to hide a lifetime of nuclear waste. Harris seems to conflate electricity and energy (an important distinction) when talking about solar vs. nuclear. The ‘solar vs. nuclear’ thrust of the article is also puzzling, since there’s no particular reason to think – nor does the author present any arguments – that one would come at the expense of the other. And not to belabour the point, but the comparison of solar power and cell phones is, frankly, a little bizarre. Cell phone use may have grown exponentially, but it’s a major leap…

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more methane surprises

METHANE HAS BEEN in the news for some time now as a source of climate alarm. The potential release of this powerful greenhouse gas from melting Arctic permafrost had considerable traction in the news over the last year. The impact of methane on climate change is more than 20 times greater than carbon dioxide over a 100-year time frame, according to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). In July of this year, researchers from Stockholm University investigated plumes of methane rising from the floor of the East Siberian Arctic Ocean. The plumes themselves were not a surprise to the scientists, but their high concentration was unexpected. Chief scientist Örjan Gustafsson speculates that the gas may be coming from collapsing methane hydrates – pockets of methane that are trapped in frozen water. Fears of…

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