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Quilting Arts Magazine

Fall 2021

Quilting Arts Magazine is published six times a year. Whether you consider yourself a contemporary quilter, fiber artist, art quilter, embellished quilter, or wearable art artist, Quilting Arts strives to meet your creative needs. Get Quilting Arts Magazine digital magazine subscription today for exceptional how-to articles, profiles artists, features guest teachers, and explores contemporary textile works, surface design, embellishments, and motifs.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Peak Media Properties, LLC
Frequency:
Bimonthly
$10.61(Incl. tax)
$35.82(Incl. tax)
6 Issues

in this issue

3 min
editor’s note

Nature provides so many opportunities for artists to experience beauty firsthand. Whether your art quilts are landscapes, abstract interpretations of wildlife, or inspired by the grandeur of the national parks, the following pages reflect how fiber artists interpret the complexity and nuance of the world around them. Over the past year, I’ve taken refuge in being outdoors and have been practicing the art of noticing. Walking has been a balm to my soul and an inspiration for my work. As John Muir said, “In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks.” I’ve often noticed the birds in my backyard have extraordinary patterns on their feathers; each leaf on a beech tree is unique; mushrooms come in all shapes and sizes; and the music of a stream running…

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3 min
about our contributors

After retiring as an art educator, Margaret Abramshe dove into being a full-time studio artist. She exhibits her works nationally and internally in museums, galleries, and major quilt shows. Using her teaching expertise, she enjoys creating online courses. Her interests outside of art are yoga and golf. She can often be found with her nose buried in a book. metaphysicalquilter.com As a late-in-life visual artist, Susan B. Schenk’s paper and textile art are an invitation to see beyond the apparent. She uses recycled materials—exploring a variety of subjects—to make art that provokes joy while also creating images in intriguing ways to compel a viewer to look more closely. susanschenk.com Sue King developed a deep passion for the outdoors in early childhood. Having served as Artist in Residence at numerous national parks and other public…

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7 min
compose a quilt on the go

Whether I am using my cell phone or tablet I can, with a few taps of a finger, completely transform any picture in my gallery. Modifying photographs using editing software is valuable creative play. In a few minutes of focused time, I can create a variety of compositions from a single image saved to my device’s gallery. Using a process of selecting, cropping, correcting, and applying filters, I have multiple options for my next project. My advice is to take lots of photographs but use only a few. Spotting a good image is simple. It should be in focus and have something that immediately captures your attention. If I have multiple photographs of the same subject, I select the image that has the best color and contrast. CROP THE PHOTO My sample photograph…

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1 min
it’s your turn

Editor’s Note: In the Spring 2021 issue, on page 26 of the “More Pieces of the Past: Competition Winners” gallery, the quilt by Vonda Jacques was misidentified. The title of the quilt is “Grandpa Was a Chevy Man.” We apologize for this error. DEAR QUILTING ARTS, I wish to thank you for the challenge and the lovely photos of “PIN-TACULAR!” (the Reader Challenge gallery in the Summer 2021 issue). The pincushions are beautiful, creative, and imaginative. What a visual treat! I also read the article (about) “The Remembrance Project.” It is amazing what the Social Justice Sewing Academy is doing. We learn from history and it is important to get to the truth. Thank you for both articles and … well, each and every magazine. Joyce Dewsbury Gainesville, Florida DEAR QUILTING ARTS, My quilt, “A Colorful Stamp,” was…

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4 min
fantastic faces

mosaic art flows through history and cultures, spanning the globe. Creation of patterns using small pieces of colored, natural, and/or man-made materials defines mosaic artwork. One day, while sifting through a pile of books at a yard sale, I stumbled across a publication featuring mosaic art. Fabulous, majestic mosaic figures within the Italian cathedrals in Florence and Orvieto dazzled my attention. Artists in the 14th century decorated these walls and ceilings using small gold and glass tiles with dark grout. They repeated the rectangular shapes to create stunning geometric compositions and portraits of biblical figures … a simple, repeated rectangular shape created unlimited options. In these mosaics, the repetition of pattern became very important, the color selection almost secondary. Intrigued, I wanted to replicate the Byzantine-style mosaic process using cloth. With some…

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6 min
needles, beetles, and beads

For years, I loved visiting the garment district in New York City and exploring the shops that featured embellishments. One in particular carried a treasure trove of vintage trims, ribbons, and buttons, many of which had been collected over 75 years by the grandfather of the proprietor. One display held a trim from the 1930s that included actual Brazilian beetles. I am not a fan of bugs, but the image of that beetle fringe has stayed with me, and I finally decided to take a stab—literally—at making my own. First, I had to source beetles. The thought of catching and killing bugs made me a little queasy, and the 17-year periodical cicadas that invaded Maryland this past summer were so biblical in number and horrific in appearance that I just stayed…

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