EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Cars & Motorcycles
Road & Track

Road & Track March/April 2017

Road & Track includes technical features on automotive subjects, wide-ranging feature stories, spectacular automotive art and standard-setting new-car photography, humor, fiction, travel stories, book reviews and the most comprehensive racing coverage offered by a monthly magazine.Bonus: iPad Interactive

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hearst
Frequency:
One-off
Read More

in this issue

2 min.
ferrari invades daytona

JUST LIKE YESTERDAY GENTLEMEN’S PARADE A-LIST CARS, STARS DAYTONA GRAND PRIX…

3 min.
letters

Dear R&T, If one were to have the good fortune to choose between the Porsche 918 Spyder and LaFerrari [“Unfamiliar Territory,” November], it would be a bit like choosing between a beautiful hausfrau and an exotic mistress. Both are alluring in their own way . . . and both are capable of killing you. Pick wisely. JONATHAN MILLER, BOONE, NORTH CAROLINA I very much enjoyed your article about the LaFerrari and 918, including your discussion of the Ross family. At a Ferrari Club of America meet in 1995, Stan Ross was a red blur driving around Mid-Ohio, thrilling the crowd. And in 2016, his son Malcolm did the same in his 918 at speed on track with a pair of LaFerraris. Great sights and sounds. Not all machinery is parked in a garage…

2 min.
editor’s letter

DRIVE ENOUGH NEW CARS on a regular basis and it’s easy to believe you can tell what a car will be like even before you get behind the wheel. If it’s a European sports coupe, expect an emphasis on style and driving experience. An Asian crossover will skew toward conventional everyday livability, while an American family sedan will fall somewhere in between. Gross generalizations, certainly, but also never terribly far from the truth. Automakers tend to stick with what they know, so the attentive enthusiast can usually anticipate what’s coming. Thankfully, there are exceptions. Vehicles that stray from the predictable, offering something different and unforeseen. One such treat is this month’s cover car, the Lexus LC 500. Unveiled at the 2012 Detroit auto show as the LF-LC concept, the show car…

5 min.
miata, people

IT WAS ONE OF THOSE CRACKLY WINTER DAYS, the sky blue enough to eat. Maybe three o’clock in the afternoon. I was downtown, fishing keys from my pocket, when the cop walked up. I ask how long you’ve had it?” He meant the car. It wasn’t mine—when you work for a car magazine, you spend a lot of time with borrowed license plates. In this case, that meant driving a Fiat 124 test car across town on an errand, to buy coffee beans. R&T is based in Michigan but I work from home, in Seattle; this sounds cool and modern but is really just HR code for brewing lots of coffee while the dog farts under your desk. Every so often, a kibble backfire shows up right when you run out…

6 min.
lexus rising

CAR CONNOISSEURS, it is time to put away your knives. To cease the mean jabs. “It’s pretty good . . . for a Lexus.” Akio Toyoda, president of Toyota and Lexus brand ambassador, listened, politely, as you told him that his cars were a bore. After a research trip to the United States in 2011, he returned to Japan and issued an executive edict: Banish the boredom. The result, more than five years on, sits in front of us today, in the Spanish sun, and we can say unequivocally: You ain’t gonna yawn. The LC 500 is the production version of the LF-LC concept car shown in Detroit in 2012. It is a big-boned, rear-drive coupe, slightly shorter than a Mercedes E-class coupe but wider and lower. The Lexus uses its size…

15 min.
rising tide

STAND AN OMEGA SPEEDMASTER MOONWATCH PROFESSIONAL on its face, and you’ll find an inscription on the case back: “Flight-qualified by NASA for all manned space missions. The first watch worn on the moon.” For a certain kind of person, that inscription is irresistible. It’s a piece of something bigger, the ordinary made exceptional. The appliance that can go into orbit. That person wants a European sedan. Eighty large in pocket, the well-to-do modern enthusiast is jonesing for an overpowered commuter with paddle shifters and pedigree. He or she is spoiled for choice. BMW, Mercedes, and Alfa Romeo all made hay on the back of touring-car racing. Each earned a cult following decades ago by way of competition-minded engineering and sharp homologation road cars. Machines like the E30 M3, Mercedes 190E, and…