EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Tech & Gaming
RotorDrone Pro

RotorDrone Pro March - April 2020

RotorDrone Pro is the world’s number one drone media brand. We’re dedicated to today’s drone enthusiast and prosumer, serving up essential information for every audience—from beginners to sport racers to professional aerial cinematographers to commerical users.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Air Age Media
Frequency:
Bimonthly
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6 Issues

in this issue

2 min.
ces 2020: latest drone tech

Continuing the RotorDrone Pro tradition, in this issue we cover the drone portion of the worldfamous electronics extravaganza that is known simply as “CES.” Along with more conventional UAVs, this year’s show offered an up-close look at some urban air mobility (UAM) concept aircraft from Hyundai and Bell, as well as industrial hydrogen-powered drones. Also, you will not be disappointed by the high-tech innovations in compact camera drones, which seem to get smaller and smarter in every new rendition. Head to page 24 for our special 14-page feature to get the inside scoop on the all of the exciting new drone tech coming your way in 2020, and don’t miss our RotorDrone Pro top picks for Best Cool Tech, Top Value, Top Innovation, Best Pro Drone, and Best of Show.…

2 min.
contributors

Flying Under the Midnight Sun Greg Horne Greg is a Parks Canada Resource Management Officer who is at home on skis or horseback patrol in the Canadian Rockies. His duties involve field data collection, monitoring resources like glaciers, caves, wildlife, and vegetation. He and his wife Louise Jarry have made a dozen trips to Canada’s Nunavut Territory, each at least a month-long ski tour in the glaciated mountains of Canada’s Eastern Arctic. With interest in photography spanning 45 years, Greg has discovered the value of the aerial perspective offered by drones, both for its aid in documentation and the unmatched beauty of aerial views. He is a contributor to alpine climbing journals and magazines, a professional interpretive guide, and canyoneering guide. Air Support: Insta360 One X George Suresh A professional photographer, George has found that…

4 min.
return to home

RotorDroneMag.com Swiss Post Drones Recently, we made a post regarding the Swiss Post delivery system resuming operations after being suspended following two drone crashes. After a review by an independent board of experienced aviation specialists, review board member Michel Guillaume said, “Swiss Post and Matternet [the U.S.company that maintains the fleet] maintain high safety standards and a high level of safety awareness. The processes that were examined were at a high standard even before the incidents. There are no reasons why flight operations should not be resumed.” Changes to be made to their operations after the incident were: implementation of the new safety recommendations set by the Federal Office of Civil Aviation and the Swiss Transportation Safety Investigation Board; establishment of independent oversight for safety-related processes before the end of March 2020; Swiss…

11 min.
latest news & gear

ICE CREAM NOW! Terra Drone Europe, a Japan-based corporation, has joined forces with Unilever, the British-Dutch consumer goods giant, to explore drone delivery service of Unilever’s Ben & Jerry’s ice cream brand in New York. To introduce the delivery service—Ice Cream Now—a demonstration was conducted at Unilever’s annual investor event. Th ree Ben & Jerry’s ice cream cups were delivered by a drone to a predetermined destination. During the demonstration, a multirotor drone was fitted with a custom delivery box designed to carry the Ben & Jerry’s mini cups. The flight path being set beforehand, the drone delivered the ice cream to its destination inside Unilever’s U.S. facility. Launched in 2017, Unilever’s Ice Cream Now service has already grown into a huge business worldwide. With regulations for future drone flights expected to become…

7 min.
faa update: pilot testing procedures change

Nothing lasts forever, not even the staid administrative procedures of federal agencies. Until January of this year, the process for taking the Airman Knowledge Test (ATK) had not changed since I earned my private pilot’s certificate nearly 30 years ago. Now, whether your goal is to become a commercial drone pilot, an airline transport pilot, or to earn any other rating that falls under the FAA’s jurisdiction—including parachute rigger and aircraft dispatcher—you will need to take an additional step. Change can be stressful, especially if becoming a certified drone pilot is your only interaction with an administrative behemoth like the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), which can already be a daunting prospect. However, in this case, the changes are to everyone’s advantage. So let’s take a look at some common questions people…

7 min.
foxfury d3060 drone light

The next time you are out flying a mission during civil twilight, or under a daylight waiver to 14 CFR Part 107, spare a thought for the people who design your beacons. As drone pilots, we demand a lot from our strobes: they should be bright as the sun, light as a feather, tough as nails, cheap as dirt, easy as pie, smaller than a postage stamp, and flash for days on a single battery charge. Of course, that combination of attributes cannot be achieved in this material reality: The laws of physics simply won’t allow it. Longer endurance means a bigger battery, which increases weight. A brighter beam means a bigger lamp and more bulk. A rugged housing increases both size and weight, as do user-friendly controls. All of this…