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Shooting Times & CountryShooting Times & Country

Shooting Times & Country

26-Jun-2019

Since its launch in 1882, Shooting Times & Country Magazine has been at the forefront of the shooting scene. The magazine is the clear first choice for shooting sportsmen, with editorial covering all disciplines, including gameshooting, rough shooting, pigeon shooting, wildfowling and deer stalking. Additionally the magazine has a strong focus on the training and use of gundogs in the field and, because it is a weekly publication, the magazine keeps readers firmly up-to-date with the latest news in their world.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
TI-Media
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52 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
best use of land

As far as I’m concerned, holidays should consist of walking-up grouse in the Hebrides or casting a fly on a hill loch. Last week though, under duress, I went to France. Predictably, it was too hot and the beer was weak and, a little less predictably, I was put in charge of an aggressive Dalmatian. One evening, while watching the sun go down, my host remarked: “We often have the chasse in these fields. They park in the courtyard and go where they please.” He added they had never given anyone permission, “it’s just what they’ve always done”. I thought about how difficult it can be to get permission to shoot in the UK. In many ways, our culture of landownership has a lot going for it, particularly in terms of conservation,…

access_time2 min.
licences: business as usual

The three new general licences issued by Defra mark a return to the situation before the original licences were withdrawn in April. Users of the licences do not have to apply for them and there is no need to record nor report back on their use. With the exception of black-backed gulls and collared doves, the new licences — now published in full, with a few changes — cover all species listed on the licences that were revoked in April. “The new licences have resolved questions over decoying and shooting over stubble” Black-backed gulls have been removed due to concerns over their conservation status, though the reason for removing collared doves from the licence remains unclear. However, lethal control of key quarry and pest species —including woodpigeons, feral pigeons, crows, rooks, magpies, jackdaws and…

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sga hits back in video row

The Scottish Gamekeepers Association (SGA) has hit back at criticism from Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) over a video on hare management. One criticism by SNH was that the browsing impacts of mountain hares were being “greatly exaggerated”. A headkeeper advises that “hare graze heavily all year round... which can have an adverse effect on flora.” The comments came to light after a Freedom of Information (FOI) request revealed SNH internal emails that said the Grampian Moorland Group video made “misleading claims”. A spokesman for the Scottish Gamekeepers Association told Shooting Times: “The SGA and SNH have long disagreed over issues such as the browsing impact of hare and deer on habitats, and would have these same differences of opinion tomorrow, regardless of FOIs or internal emails. “Scottish Natural Heritage has said that high hare…

access_time1 min.
waders campaign gears up

Soil Association Scotland held an event for farmers and gamekeepers near Galashiels as part of the Working for Waders initiative, a project that draws on the experience and knowledge of land managers and matches practical know-how with the latest scientific information. A total of 37 farmers turned out to see work being carried out to conserve lapwings by Colin Strang-Steel at Threepwood Farm, and the discussion ranged from creating and maintaining wader scrapes to predator control. Shooting Times contributor and Soil Association Scotland spokesman Patrick Laurie said: “This event shows how much enthusiasm there is among farmers for wader conservation. “We had some frank and productive conversations today, and we all agreed that there is plenty of room for collaboration,” he added. “Working for Waders has a chance to make a real difference for…

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to do this week

SHOOT Do you have land that could be shot over and isn’t used for much? All across the country there are people with neglected ponds and areas of land where pests are flourishing. There are also people who are very keen on shooting but struggle to get permissions. If you are one of the former, why not help out one of the latter and help get more people more involved in our sport? Pigeon-watch forums or social media would be a free and easy way to reach out. BOOK Make sure you have your tickets for the GWCT Scottish Game Fair, which takes place from 5 to 7 July in Scone, Perthshire. The event features an impressive line-up of exhibitors, with competitions, expert coaching and sports activities for all ages and abilities, from fishing…

access_time2 min.
relief on licences but fears remain

The new general licences issued by Defra have been broadly welcomed by shooters, countryside organisations and businesses, though concerns about possible future legal challenges remain. In a joint statement a group of countryside organisations — including BASC, the Countryside Alliance, the GWCT, the Moorland Association and the National Gamekeepers’ Organisation — said, “Genuine progress has been made and three new general licences released by Defra today are fit for purpose in most circumstances. “The new licences cover the majority of activity which is undertaken in the English countryside for pest control and crop protection, and satisfy the need to provide control to protect public health.” Chris Phillips of UK Shoot Warehouse, who contacted us when the business was forced to lay off a colleague (News, 12 June), was cautiously optimistic. “We welcome the…

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