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Shooting Times & CountryShooting Times & Country

Shooting Times & Country

13-Mar-2019

Since its launch in 1882, Shooting Times & Country Magazine has been at the forefront of the shooting scene. The magazine is the clear first choice for shooting sportsmen, with editorial covering all disciplines, including gameshooting, rough shooting, pigeon shooting, wildfowling and deer stalking. Additionally the magazine has a strong focus on the training and use of gundogs in the field and, because it is a weekly publication, the magazine keeps readers firmly up-to-date with the latest news in their world.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Time Inc. (UK) Ltd
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52 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
sybil

Sybil, a Sealyham terrier, has perfected the arts of scrounging, snoring and barking loudly at intruders both inside and outside her domain. She picks-up with the rest of the pack at Compton Manor shoot. In association with Orvis For all things dog, Shooting Times recommends Orvis.co.uk  Outdoor outfitters, instructors and apparel makers since 1856.…

access_time1 min.
get the picture

In this week’s issue there is a letter from a reader (p.13) drawing attention to the fact that, in a piece we ran recently, there is a photo of a novice Shot whose stance is incorrect and who has an eye closed.“Why use poor pictures?” asks the letter writer. On one hand he has a valid point. You could argue Shooting Times has a duty to display best practice in each and every photo in the hope that people who are vaguely interested in our sport and pick up a copy of the magazine see how to do it properly.But that’s a position I’d disagree with. I remember one autumn day borrowing a horse and taking it hunting — my breeches were the wrong colour, I was wearing a…

access_time2 min.
botswana to lift hunt ban?

A hunting ban in Botswana may be about to come to an end after a group of government ministers asked President Masisi to change the law. “The increased expansion of the elephant population has impoverished communities” The ban was introduced by former president Ian Khama in 2014 and was described in Botswana’s Sunday Standard newspaper as “the ultimate victory by photographic safari investors against trophy-hunting safari tourism investors, their long-time rivals”. Questions were raised over Mr Khama’s connections to the photographic safari business and to anti-hunting campaigners.A formal study of the ban’s effects by Professor Toseph Mbaiwa of the University of Botswana said the ban “has led to a reduction of tourism benefits to local communities such as income, employment opportunities and provision of housing for the…

access_time1 min.
shooting ends on nrw land

The move to ban pheasant shooting on NRW-managed land was criticised for its lack of clear rationale The ban on pheasant shooting on land managed by Natural Resources Wales (NRW) has come into force. The existing leases expired on 1 March and will not be renewed.The decision to end shooting and rearing of game birds on land managed by NRW was taken by former Welsh environment minister Hannah Blythyn and went against advice from an expert report. The move was opposed by fieldsports organisations and drew criticism for its damaging effects and lack of clear rationale. Ms Blythyn, who has now been demoted to deputy minister for housing, subsequently tried to distance herself from the decision, claiming that she had merely expressed a view and NRW was…

access_time1 min.
scots salmon rivers classified

The classifications of Scotland’s 173 salmon rivers for 2019 have been announced. The classification determines whether mandatory catch-and-release will be enforced on a river. Scotland’s “big four” — the rivers Dee, Spey, Tweed and Tay — have been given category one status Scotland’s four largest salmon rivers — the Dee, Spey, Tweed and Tay — have all been given category one status, meaning that the current level of catch is sustainable and that the small number of anglers killing fish on those rivers will be able to continue to do so.The classification system has been criticised in the past for the tendency of rivers to move between gradings for no clear reason.Duncan Ferguson of the Scottish Gamekeepers Association Fishing Group, commented: “More thought is certainly going into it…

access_time1 min.
weekend twitter poll

Which is the best terrier for ratting?  follow us @shootingtimes Respondents: 212…

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