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Sports IllustratedSports Illustrated

Sports Illustrated

October 21, 2019

Through emotional storytelling and award-winning photography, Sports Illustrated provides you with complete coverage of all your favorite sports, including the NFL, College Football, Baseball, College Basketball, the NBA and more.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Corporation
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27 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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now on si digital

Five-Minute Drill SO MANY stories swirl around the NFL every day. Will All-Pro cornerback Jalen Ramsey (above) stay in Jacksonville? Who will be the next coach of the Redskins? MMQB News to the rescue. In a five-minute podcast MMQB’s insiders and analysts update you on everything from the injuries affecting your fantasy lineup to the latest rumors from the coaching carousel. Subscribe for free on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Radio.com and all other major podcast platforms. New episodes are available each weekday afternoon, so start your evening commute by getting a brief but thorough rundown of the only NFL news you need: MMQB News. LET’S PLAY Power Moves Between the end of the last NBA season and before the start of this one, we’ve seen Anthony Davis join LeBron James (below) and the Lakers,…

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big ups, backups

FOLLOW @SIFULLFRAME…

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inbox

FLASH POINT I beg to differ that the Astros built the SCARIEST POSTSEASON ROTATION EVER, as touted on the cover. The 1971 Orioles had four 20-game winners (Jim Palmer, Mike Cuellar, Pat Dobson and Dave McNally) with a combined 70 complete games. And they lost to the Pirates in the World Series. Richard A. Nyborg Pooler, Ga. No disrespect to Gerrit Cole and Justin Verlander, but the scariest postseason rotation belonged to the 2010 Giants (Tim Lincecum, Madison Bumgarner, Matt Cain and Jonathan Sanchez). Charles Margiotta Livermore, Calif. THIS IS/WAS BRAVES COUNTRY As a lifelong Braves fan who endured its basement-dwelling teams of the 1970s and ’80s, I found Brian Burnsed’s article on the city and its sports teams polarizing. Money—not race—was the primary reason the Braves left Atlanta. The city refused to match Cobb County’s offer, electing…

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red scare

IN JUNE 1973, more than two years after the U.S. table tennis team helped the Nixon administration open diplomatic ties to China, another delegation of American athletes was dispatched on a similar mission. At the invitation of the State Department, two teams of men’s and women’s college basketball players spent the month barnstorming the People’s Republic, which rolled out a Red carpet of dinners, receptions and fan events for its honored hoopster guests. Even Jiang Qing, then wife of Chairman Mao, made a surprise appearance at an exhibition game in Beijing. “It was a splendid scene of friendship,” wrote SI’s William Johnson, who accompanied the party, “with the small, dignified first lady of China reaching up, up, up to grasp the hands of the smiling young giants from America.” That was…

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what’s fair

IN THE last day of September, California governor Gavin Newsom officially ushered college sports into a new era. Signing into law Senate Bill 206, known as the Fair Pay to Play Act, from a barbershop chair on the set of LeBron James’s show, The Shop, Newsom granted college athletes in his state the opportunity to profit off their name, image and likeness, beginning in 2023. They will be able to sign with agents and earn endorsement money as students, which is expressly forbidden by the NCAA’s bylaws preserving amateurism. But the Golden State is not alone. Legislators in New York, Florida and Illinois have already proposed similar bills while a half-dozen other states plan to follow suit. Meanwhile, members of Congress are eyeing a federal statute along the same lines. There…

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rare form

THOUGH IT won’t go down as a world record, Eliud Kipchoge’s historic run on Oct. 12 is no less a marvel of human achievement: He covered 26.2 miles through Prater Park in Vienna in less than two hours—1:59:40.2, to be precise. The 34-year-old Kenyan (in white), who holds the official marathon record at 2:01:39, was aided by a small army of 41 pacesetters. From his perch atop a cherry picker 30 feet above tree-lined Hauptallee Avenue, photographer Jon Super had the ideal angle to capture Kipchoge and his phalanx. “They were incredibly well-rehearsed,” Super says. “I didn’t notice it at first, but looking at it now, they are all perfectly in step.”…

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