EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Sports
Sports IllustratedSports Illustrated

Sports Illustrated

February 11, 2019

Through emotional storytelling and award-winning photography, Sports Illustrated provides you with complete coverage of all your favorite sports, including the NFL, College Football, Baseball, College Basketball, the NBA and more.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Meredith Corporation
Read Morekeyboard_arrow_down
BUY ISSUE
$6.89(Incl. VAT)
SUBSCRIBE
$53.84(Incl. VAT)
27 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
summer on the silver screen

WHILE SPRING may still seem a distant dream to Midwesterners defrosting from the subzero temperatures of a polar vortex, major league pitchers and catchers begin to report to camps in Arizona and Florida on Feb. 11. And just in time for the return of baseball, two of the sport’s best movies are now available on SI TV.This season marks the 100th anniversary of the Black Sox scandal, which led to lifetime bans for the eight White Sox who threw the World Series to the Reds. Eight Men Out (1988), directed by John Sayles, focuses on the compromised players and stars John Cusack, Charlie Sheen and Clifton James.The Natural (1984), based on the novel by Bernard Malamud, features Robert Redford as Roy Hobbs (above), a mysterious, aging player with seemingly divine…

access_time1 min.
sixth lords

EVEN THOSE who consider them the NFL’s Evil Empire have to grudgingly admit that these Patriots guys are pretty good. On a night in Atlanta when the New England offense struggled to put points on the board, the defense picked up the slack, battering the Rams with a dominant performance. Los Angeles, which had the league’s second-best offense, gained just 260 yards, 161 less than its average, and became the second team in Super Bowl history not to score a touchdown.THIS ONE THROWS TO 11Brady called Julian Edelman’s number over and over, targeting the wideout a team-high 12 times. And the former college QB responded, snagging 10 balls for 141 yards and walking away with the Pete Rozelle Trophy as the game’s MVP. (PHOTOGRAPH BY ROB TRINGALI)ON THE SONY SIDEThe…

access_time2 min.
inbox

OFFICIALLY AWFULAlthough I agree wholeheartedly with Michael Rosenberg’s assertion that NFL referees have to live up to an impossible standard (SCORECARD), I take issue with his reasoning that technology had any thing to do with the blown call during the Rams-Saints game. Instant replay did not alert us to Nickell Robey-Coleman’s blatant pass-interference penalty. Fans in the Superdome and millions watching saw it live. It was so obvious.Mark SkeenProsser, Wash.The NFL’s integrity took a huge shot by missing that call. All I care about is a fair outcome, and that was not the case. The wrong team is representing the NFC in the Super Bowl. The officials blew it. The football-rooting world knows it.John HammondBaltimoreLET THE BIG DOGS FEASTI’m an old-guy golfer, who over a good stretch has a mid-teens…

access_time4 min.
threat of the brow

(MICHAEL REAVES/GETTY IMAGES)BEFORE YOU criticize Anthony Davis for his strategically timed trade demand, before you bemoan the eventual defection of another All-NBA player from a small-market team, understand: New Orleans brought a lot of this on itself. Years of doling out cap-crippling contracts (Ryan Anderson, Omer Asik, Solomon Hill) and dealing away draft picks put the Pelicans in the position they are in today—well under .500 with little reason to be optimistic about the future. Yes Davis asked out of New Orleans last week, but given the state of the franchise, market size wasn’t among the top reasons why.Still New Orleans is a small market, and Davis will eventually become another name on a growing list of NBA stars who have left them. Kevin Durant bailed on Oklahoma City for…

access_time2 min.
all about mo

WHEN ALL 425 ballots submitted had check marks next to his name, Yankees closer Mariano Rivera became the first unanimous selection to Cooperstown. It doesn’t mean that he’s the single greatest player, but it does mean that Rivera is the single player whose greatness could overcome the quirky loyalties and persnickety logic of baseball writers. (And, really, that’s its own form of greatness.) When he’s inducted in July, Rivera will stand alone in making history—and yet he won’t be alone at all, with a career deeply linked to the other members of his induction class. One shared a team with him. One got a grip from him. And one should probably buy him dinner.49Starts by Mussina as a Yankee that were closed by RiveraMIKE MUSSINAMussina had 123 regular-season wins in…

access_time1 min.
masked marvel

BASEBALL GAMES, especially in spring’s unfocused early days, consist mostly of nothingness. But intrasquad action doesn’t seem quite so humdrum from behind the plate, John G. Zimmerman reported in 1959. He had thrown a catcher’s mask over the 28mm lens of his Bell & Howell Foton, hoping to capture what an umpire sees. On the mound for the White Sox was seven-time All-Star Billy Pierce, one of the ’50s hardest throwers. The fastball sailed by Earl Battey, the hitter, into catcher Sherm Lollar’s mitt. “Nothing happened,” Zimmerman said, “but I sure flinched.”For more, follow @sifullframe ■…

SPECIAL ISSUES

RECENT ISSUES

help