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Survivor's EdgeSurvivor's Edge

Survivor's Edge

September/October 2019

Survivor’s Edge prepares you for real world disasters with the skills and knowledge to take on whatever comes your way

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Athlon Media Group
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6 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
survivors edge

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Nino Bosaz EDITOR IN CHIEF Ryan Lee Price DEPUTY EDITOR Linas Cernauskas ART DIRECTOR James Walsh* COVER DESIGN Rory Slifkin PREMEDIA Franco Nguyen DIGITAL MANAGER Matthew Hogan EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Amelia Wilhelm* EDITORIAL COORDINATOR Richard Ortega CIRCULATION CONSULTANT Scott Hill/ProCirc COVER PHOTO Straight 8* EDITORIAL INQUIRIES editdesk@athlonoutdoors.com realworldsurvivor.com • tactical-life.com ballisticmag.com • personaldefenseworld.com athlonoutdoors.com VP/GROUP PUBLISHER & CONTENT DIRECTOR Nicholas S. Seifert ADVERTISING SALES National Office 212-478-1910; sales@athlonoutdoors.com Independent Account Representatives NORTHEAST REGION Scott Buchmayr 978-462-6335 SOUTHEAST & UPPER MIDWEST Amos Crowley 216-378-9811 WESTERN REGION Scott J. Cherek 307-635-8899 MIDWEST/CENTRAL SOUTH Dan Flavin 248-515-8654 DIRECT RESPONSE SALES Jim Coen 212-478-1949 SENIOR DIRECTOR MARKETING & OPERATIONS Carrie Roeder DIGITAL SALES DEVELOPMENT & MARKETING DIRECTOR Brock Norman ATHLON MEDIA GROUP Corporate Officers PRESIDENT, CEO Chuck Allen CFO/TREASURER CORPORATE ADDRESSES Mary Lee Vanderkooi New York: 60 E. 42nd St., Suite 820, NY, NY 10165; 212-478-1910 Nashville: 2451 Atrium Way, Suite 320 Nashville, TN 37214 800-284-5668 SUBSCRIPTIONS/SINGLE COPIES: 800-284-5668 subscriptions@athlonoutdoors.com ONLINE STORE: outdoorgroupstore.com * Consultant…

access_time3 min.
life uncontrolled

MOST OF US wake up at a specific time in the morning. We sit in the same chair for breakfast, drive the same route to work and return home just as predictably. We follow well-worn paths, and we like them. Human beings enjoy consistency, certainty and the pleasing results of the status quo. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Change, to many, has a negative connotation that threatens to cut our safety nets, as most people feel that change will have an adverse effect on their lives. It’s the unknown, the darkness in the abyss, the unseen, unpredictable terrain firmly outside of our comfort zones—but life is about change. Change is inevitable. It is thrust upon us. Being born is the first change that we could not control, and if…

access_time10 min.
autumn gear

Cooler temperatures bring renewed interest in outdoor activities, and with those come challenges and dangers both foreseen and unforeseen. Be prepared for anything autumn brings with these fresh new products! 1. ADVENTURE MEDICAL KITS Trauma Pak III Adventure Medical Kits’ most advanced trauma kit, the Trauma Pak III puts professional supplies in civilian hands, empowering you to take action to stop bleeding as it occurs. The waterproof, resealable trauma bag contains military-style tools and emergency essentials in a package compact and durable enough to keep in your glove box. Inside, you’ll find a pressure trauma dressing (Israeli Bandage), which combines gauze, trauma pad and pressure applicator into one easy-to-use emergency bandage capable of providing up to 40 pounds of direct pressure to stop bleeding fast and control most major bleeds. MSRP: $40. (adventuremedicalkits.com) 2.…

access_time2 min.
losing ground

It all started when Nome, Alaska, resident Phillip Rode noticed that his friend’s snow machine was in a photo of an ice shelf that was breaking off from the shore. “I called John [Culp] to make sure that he was OK, that his stuff was alright, because it looked like his,” said Rode. He volunteered to help, and the pair set off the next day with a third friend. Their plan was to ferry Culp’s gold-mining equipment to safety using a skiff. But when they arrived on location, conditions were even more extreme than expected. “Usually, the ice is 8 feet thick. This year it was only a couple feet thick, not even frozen very hard,” said Rode. “It’s bizarre.” They set to work immediately, moving the equipment from the fast-melting…

access_time2 min.
wrong turn

That Thursday was Sharlene Heikes’ last day of work. The 21-year-old was driving home in her 2008 Dodge Avenger after ending her final shift at Hope Haven when she discovered that early-season flooding had closed her usual route. So, she decided to take a back route. “The roads were fine until I got onto Garfield Avenue,” she said. “I got to the Little Rock River bridge and, in the blink of an eye, my car was swept away in the current of the flood without me even seeing the water.” By the next day, the Rock River would crest to 21.6 feet—the second highest level ever recorded. But for Heikes, the danger was already there. “I had no control,” she said. “I was floating in the water in my car with…

access_time2 min.
lucky punch

The next thing we’ll see is a bear,” joked 26-year-old Andi Bauer to his girlfriend, Lara Booth. They’d been out backpacking for a handful of days in the Carpathian Mountains of Romania and had already seen a snake, a lizard and six wild boar. But neither of them really thought that there was much danger of running into a bear; in fact, Bauer had argued that they leave their bear spray behind, thinking the odds of the canister exploding was higher than that of a dangerous encounter. The next bend in the trail would prove otherwise, putting Bauer mere feet away from a mother bear with her two cubs not far behind. The bruin wasted no time lunging at Bauer. “It bit my leg, held onto it and dragged me and…

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