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Artists MagazineArtists Magazine

Artists Magazine January/February 2019

Readers learn painting and drawing firsthand from other artists through written instruction and reproduction, guiding them step-by-step through the creative process. The magazine shows readers a wide variety of creative options, teaching the fundamentals of art making, presenting techniques in different painting and drawing media.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
F+W Media, Inc. - Magazines
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10 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time2 min.
warm up to winter

The cold and bluster of the winter season can certainly present its share of challenges, but that doesn’t diminish its potential to inspire artists. Andrew Wyeth was one artist who felt a special connection to the season. “I prefer winter and fall,” he said, “when you feel the bone structure of the landscape—the loneliness of it, the dead feeling of winter. Something waits beneath it; the whole story doesn’t show.” Whether it’s an earthy winter palette, the various textures of a barren landscape or the luminous thrill of sunlight on fresh snow, there’s plenty in the season to stir creative excitement. In this issue, you’ll meet several artists who find winter a more than worthy subject. Artist Eric Aho (page 80) turns his impressions of the landscape into large, gestural abstracts.…

access_time2 min.
dove gray

gray sometimes gets pushed to the side as a forgettable noncolor that exists between all the other, more exciting ones. Technically, true gray doesn't contain color—it's a shade; but, in practice, grays muddle with color and exist as a rainbow of hues, effective for imbuing feelings from joy to sorrow to playfulness into a piece of art. Dove gray typically includes a hint of pink or blue, making it a gentle, slightly feminine version of the familiar shade. Perhaps this is why Whistler chose to set the stage for his mother's portrait with a background of dove gray that almost shows as purple against the stark blacks and whites of the subject's outfit and the rest of the room. Whatever the artist's reason, the color shines in this now-iconic portrait. "Gray is…

access_time3 min.
boston: cradle of liberty and architecture

the “Hub,” “Beantown,” “Cradle of Liberty”—these are the nicknames by which I came to know the city of my youth. I grew up in Cambridge, and Boston, across the Charles River, was my immediate Mecca. I detested the proverbial Boston baked beans; however, my visual diet from the age of 9 was the local smorgasbord of extraordinary architecture. I delighted in structures designed by American greats from Charles Bulfinch (1763–1844) to Henry Hobson Richardson (1838–1886) to the 20th-century firm Kallmann, McKinnell & Knowles. The latter is hardly a household name, but I became familiar with it because, on Sundays, my father would take me to major construction sites to observe new buildings. The 1962 Boston City Hall—based on the firm’s competition-winning design—was going up, and the site, amazingly enough, was completely…

access_time6 min.
winter watercolor sketching

If you’re a watercolorist who enjoys nature journaling or urban sketching, you don’t need to curtail your outdoor art endeavors just because the weather has turned cold and snowy. As a Minnesota resident, I can’t stop sketching for five or more months of the year due to inclement weather, so I’ve devised nine ways to take back the winter months—and put the inevitable snow piles to use as sketching and painting fodder. 1 EASE INTO WINTER SKETCHING. Instead of standing outside in zero-degree weather for several hours creating a masterpiece, work from the heated comfort of your vehicle. I like to drive to the nearby Sears parking lot where big mountains of snow are created by snowplows clearing the lot. By the time I reach this destination, my car is warmed up,…

access_time1 min.
we asked... what is the most beautiful book about art that you own?

“Dessins d’Ingres: Catalogue Raisonné des Dessins du Musée de Montauban (Ingres’ Drawings: Catalogue Raisonné of the Drawings of the Museum of Montauban) by Georges Vigne. Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres bequeathed to Montauban, his hometown, an exceptional set of paintings and about 4,500 drawings. In this book, each drawing is reproduced in its entirety and is accompanied by a note that includes a scientific sheet and references to exhibitions and volumes, as well as the concordance with previous inventories. It's an amazing book that I keep going back to again and again.” COSTA VAVAGIAKIS ARTIST “The two-volume set, Art of Florence (1999), by Glenn Andres, John Hunisak and Richard Turner.” CHERYL K. SNAY CURATOR OF EUROPEAN ART, SNITE MUSEUM OF ART, UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME “Call me old-fashioned, but I still relish the History of Art by…

access_time1 min.
materials

SURFACE: 12x16 Jack Richeson hardboard, first treated with Gamblin PVA Size and then with two coats of Blick Master Gesso BRUSHES: • Silver Brush Grand Prix No. 8 hog bristle flat• Silver Brush Grand Prix Nos. 2, 4 and 6 hog bristle rounds GAMBLIN ARTIST’S OIL COLORS: • cadmium yellow medium• Indian yellow• gold ochre• cadmium red• transparent earth red• brown pink• permanent alizarin crimson• dioxazine purple• cerulean blue hue• phthalo green• Portland grey light• Portland grey medium• titanium-zinc white OTHER: • Gamblin Gamsol• Gamblin solvent-free gel…

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