The Big Issue 11/22/2021

The Big Issue is one of Britain’s leading news and cultural magazines. Every week’s edition is packed full of original takes on the biggest issues of the day as well as interviews with the most significant figures in politics and entertainment. The Big Issue was founded 1991 to give people experiencing homelessness the opportunity to earn their own income. We continue to support hundreds of vendors across the UK and all proceeds from sales go to help anyone wanting to lift themselves out of poverty.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dennis Publishing UK
Frequency:
Weekly
SPECIAL: Get 40% OFF with code: START40
$5.39(Incl. tax)
$70.25(Incl. tax)
13 Issues

in this issue

1 min
broken record

At the Venezuela Military Academy in Caracas, 12,000 musicians gathered to break the record for World’s Largest Orchestra. They played Tchaikovsky’s Marche Slave, but adjudicators were still verifying the attempt as we were going to press. Although ages ranged from 12 to 77, most were young performers who have benefitted from the nationally financed El Sistema music programme, which for close to 50 years has provided free lessons for budding classical musicians with their motto: “Music for Social Change”. There are around 400 music centres in the country that have seen over 700,000 students through their doors. Critics of the government called it a propaganda stunt. Venezuelan concert pianist Gabriela Montero said: “Music, show, entertainment and distraction above human life. It will never change.” But leaving aside other political and social crises…

bigissuk211122_article_004_01_01
11 min
the dispatch

CAMPAIGN Time to end shame of children in care being handcuffed on their way to school and foster homes Campaigners and MPs are working to ban the terrible practice of handcuffing vulnerable children as young as 10 while being taken to and from school and foster homes. Private companies transporting children between care and foster homes, schools and hospitals – often in “caged” vehicles – are legally allowed to handcuff and physically restrain them as a last resort to stop at-risk children harming themselves or others. Campaigners say the reality is that handcuffs are being used as a “go-to option any time a child shows any sign of resistance” – and unlike other parts of the youth care system, companies are not required to record or report any instances of a child being put…

bigissuk211122_article_006_01_01
3 min
we can’t allow reliance on foodbanks to become the norm

Independent foodbanks are facing the bleakest of winters. Not only are they struggling to source supplies, but teams are exhausted and running on empty. Yet the relentless increase in need for their services continues unabated. Foodbanks have had to contemplate reducing the sizes of their parcels or even having to turn people away. In a devastating blow to households across the UK, the Westminster government cut £20 from Universal Credit. On top of rising energy and food prices, the cost of living is now unaffordable to millions of people. The government’s own data show 43 per cent of UK households on Universal Credit were food insecure pre-pandemic. That figure can only have increased, and 5.5 million people are now dependent on the government’s flagship social security payment. What’s more, 2.1 million…

bigissuk211122_article_011_01_01
3 min
editor’s letter

There was a curious air at the end of the COP26 conference. It was only a week or so ago but already feels lost in the rear view. As the final hours ticked over, attendees began to clear out at speed. The fancy pavilion with so many international displays – Italy’s minimalist area was a favourite, though judging climate targets via design is not, I understand, the key way forward – was being darkened and taken down, even before agreement was reached. I was stopped at least three times on the concourse by delegates who wanted to have their picture taken as they strode out of Glasgow. I’m really bad at taking photos. I fear, literally, blurring their memories. The aftermath brought a mixture of positivity and anger. There had been movement,…

bigissuk211122_article_013_01_01
4 min
bird’s words

Wherever I go now I am always reminded of the future. Whatever I do, I find myself thinking of future generations. I walk incessantly when I’m in London or other cities. And I keep thinking, among other things, about a conversation I had with an MP who asked why she should support my Wellbeing of Future Generations Bill, which is passing through Parliament. “What will it do, this Future Generations Bill, for my constituent who comes to me with an incredibly pressing problem today? Will it help her?” My reply was simple: “No, it won’t.” “So why should I help your Bill?” “Because if your predecessors as MPs had done their job 20 years ago, she might not have a problem today. Most of what you’re doing today is making up for yesterday’s…

bigissuk211122_article_015_01_01
3 min
letters

RE: DARK MONEY [November 8] Money talks For all the talk of “dark money”, the donations the named MP has accepted are declared for all to see, and one of the biggest Brexit debate donations was over four million pounds by billionaire businessman Lord Sainsbury to Remain. In a democracy sometimes the vote doesn’t always go the way “we” would like it to. It’s far easier to blame this on a conspiracy than admit that “our” side failed to produce a convincing argument. Jasper Hedger Telling article in this week’s Big Issue.Net zero could be the next target for the dark money power plays of the Brexit lobby. @geoffbarnard Mammoth mystery Your article about mammoths [November 8] is fascinating. But my reading is as follows: They didn’t “die out” – they stopped dead in their tracks while eating lunch, keeled…

bigissuk211122_article_017_01_01