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category_outlined / Cars & Motorcycles
Car and DriverCar and Driver

Car and Driver August 2019

This magazine is for automobile enthusiasts interested in domestic and imported autos. Each issue contains road tests and features on performance, sports, international coverage of road race, stock and championship car events, technical reports, personalities and products. Road tests are conducted with electronic equipment by engineers and journalists and the results are an important part of the magazine's review section. Get Car and Driver digital magazine subscription today.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Hearst
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time13 min.
backfires:

DON’T WAIT Flipping through “The 25 Cars Worth Waiting For” [May 2019], I see vehicles that are still way in the planning stages (GMC Jimmy, Ford Mach E, and Ferrari SUV), a few pipe dreams (Toyota MR2 and Rivian R1T), and some known entities (Ferrari F8 Tributo, BMW M3/M4, and Hyundai Sonata). I’m bewildered by the exclusion of the eighth generation of America’s sports car, the Chevrolet Corvette. How the hell did that not make the list?! —Scott Rothermel Grand Ledge, MI The upcoming C8 Corvette made the list last year, and in the interest of keeping the list as fresh as possible, we don’t repeat vehicles from previous years—Ed. Fixed it for you: “The 15 Cars Worth Waiting For and 10 Utility Tractors.” —David Broudy Alpharetta, GA I thought the Chevy Bison was going to…

access_time1 min.
explained: power wheels

What is the difference between engine horsepower and horsepower measured at the wheels? —Bao Duong, Encinitas, CA All the horsepower figures you see in this magazine are supplied to us by the manufacturer. Automakers measure engine output at the crankshaft. These performance statistics don’t factor in the power that’s lost to friction in the transmission, differential, and other driveline components. A chassis dynamometer is spun by the drive wheels and, consequently, its measurements include these parasitic losses. Conventional wisdom says that output at the wheels will be roughly 15 percent lower than at the crankshaft, but that’s an outdated notion. Improved bearings, lubricants, manufacturing tolerances, and computer-aided designs have reduced losses to single-digit percentages in new cars. We recently put a Toyota GR Supra on a chassis dyno. At the wheels,…

access_time2 min.
car and driver

Editor-in-Chief Sharon Silke Carty Print Director Tony Quiroga Creative Director Darin Johnson Executive Editor Jared Gall Technical Director Eric Tingwall Managing Editor Mike Fazioli Design Director Nathan Schroeder Editor at Large Daniel Pund Reviews Editor Josh Jacquot Technical Editor David Beard Associate Editor Annie White Associate Managing Editor Juli Burke Copy Chief Carolyn Pavia-Rauchman Copy Editor Beth Nichols Road-Test Editor Charles Dryer Editor, Montana Desk John Phillips European Editor Mike Duff Carolinas Editor Ezra Dyer Staff Photographer Marc Urbano Art Assistant Austin Irwin Road Warriors Harry Granito, Keoni Koch Contributing Editors Clifford Atiyeh, Csaba Csere, Malcolm Gladwell, Fred M.H. Gregory, John Pearley Huffman, Davey G. Johnson, Peter Manso, Bruce McCall, Jens Meiners, P.J. O’Rourke, Steve Siler, James Tate, Dweezil Zappa Digital Director Mike Magrath Director, Vehicle Testing Dave VanderWerp Testing Director K.C. Colwell Buyer’s Guide Executive Editor Kirk Seaman Senior Online Editors Mike Sutton, Kevin A. Wilson Senior Online Consumer Editor Rich Ceppos Online Editors Alexander Stoklosa, Andrew Wendler Associate Online Editor Joey Capparella Assistant Online Editor Daniel Golson Online Managing Editor Jennifer Misaros Online News Editor Laura Sky Brown Buyer’s Guide Assistant Editors Drew Dorian, Eric…

access_time5 min.
by popular demand

IT’S BEEN THREE YEARS since the Porsche Boxster and Cayman ditched their naturally aspirated flatsixes for turbocharged flat-fours. While we still have not made peace with that change, Porsche’s bean counters say customers didn’t seem to mind. Like their predecessors, 718 models find about 25,000 new owners a year globally. And with more power and torque than the last-generation cars, every variety of 718 we’ve tested reaffirms that these mid-engined masters pull harder with the turbocharged four-cylinders. Despite that, the 2020 718 Cayman GT4 and 718 Spyder confirm what corporate actuaries won’t admit: Cars this good should have equally special engines. Porsche’s GT customers—some of the most nitpicky people in the sports-car universe—demanded that the hottest Cayman and Boxster return with the engine they think the cars deserve. Porsche listened. These…

access_time2 min.
manifest destiny

REMEMBER LAST MONTH, when we promised you this second part in our series outlining U.S. racetracks? No? You just picked up this magazine at Hudson News to distract yourself from the indignities of air travel? Well allow us to suggest that instead of watching a rom-com on your seatback screen, you peruse this map of the Midwest’s and West’s assorted racetracks, taken from the 2018 National Speedway Directory. Chances are good there’s one near your destination. Visualize yourself enjoying its splendor. The flight will be over before you know it. WIDE-OPEN SPACES: Try a land speed run in Connecticut and you’ll end up in a hedge-fund manager’s driveway fountain. But in the desert, the water features are mirages and you can see cars coming from miles away. On Utah’s Bonneville Salt…

access_time2 min.
poison control

CARS SWIM IN CHEMICAL SOUP. Lubricants, coolants, refrigerants, adhesives, paints, waxes, upholstery treatments, battery acids, solvents, hydraulic fluids, and substances designed to make the interior smell like agarwood are the tip of the iceberg. The rest of the iceberg is the fuel. But short of bonging antifreeze, you’re not going to die immediately from exposure to the warehouse’s worth of chemicals bathing your car. But prolonged, careless intimacy with automotive substances can have serious health effects. One study, conducted in 2016 in Harar, Ethiopia, found increased blood pressure and significant, possibly toxic effects on blood chemistry in its test group of 30 garage workers relative to its control group of Haramaya University students and teachers. Besides indicating that a career in Ethiopian auto repair may be perilous, the study is a…

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