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category_outlined / Business & Finanz
Bloomberg BusinessweekBloomberg Businessweek

Bloomberg Businessweek October 7, 2019

Each issue of Businessweek features in-depth perspectives on the financial markets, industries, trends, technology and people guiding the economy. Get the digital magazine subscription today and draw upon Businessweek's timely incisive analysis to help you make better decisions about your career, your business, and your personal investments.

Land:
United States
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Bloomberg Finance LP
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IN DIESER AUSGABE

access_time2 Min.
in brief

Rudy Giuliani, Donald Trump’s personal lawyer, was subpoenaed by three House committees. Congress wants records of his dealings with Ukraine on the president’s behalf, part of the impeachment inquiry probing possible foreign interference in the 2020 elections. Giuliani has until Oct. 15 to turn over the documents. ▷ 40 In the largest such judgment in its history, the World Trade Organization allowed the U.S. to impose tariffs on as much as $7.5b of European annual exports—of everything from plane parts to wine to leather goods—in retaliation for illegal subsidies to Airbus, the main rival of America’s Boeing. A massive military parade marked the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China. President Xi Jinping declared that no force could stop the country’s rise. Meanwhile, violent protests continued in Hong Kong. Credit…

access_time1 Min.
agenda

▶ Trade War Opponents Meet Again The Trump administration plans to host Vice Premier Liu He and other senior Chinese officials for trade talks on Oct. 10 and 11, just days before another threatened increase in U.S. tariffs on imports from China is due to take effect. ▶ The Federal Open Market Committee will release the minutes from its last meeting on Oct. 9, shedding light on the logic behind the latest quarter-point rate cut. ▶ Portugal goes to the polls on Oct. 6. Surveys give current Prime Minister Antonio Costa’s Socialist Party a comfortable lead. ▶ The inaugural ANOC World Beach Games begin in Doha on Oct. 12. They’ll feature 1,200 athletes from 97 nations competing in 12 sports. ▶ The 40th annual Oil & Money conference, in London Oct. 8-10, will focus…

access_time2 Min.
proceed with caution

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s decision to open a formal impeachment inquiry is a momentous step. Without some caution, it could also be a perilous one for American democracy. The impetus was a whistleblower complaint by a U.S. intelligence official that alleges misconduct by the president. Trump’s administration tried its best to prevent the full complaint from being shared with Congress, which Pelosi said was the last straw. As the details of the case have emerged, it’s become evident why the president wanted to suppress them: They show a flagrant abuse of power. In July, Trump had a phone call with Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy. According to the complaint, Trump attempted to cajole his newly elected counterpart into digging up dirt on former Vice President Joe Biden, Trump’s chief rival in the…

access_time5 Min.
time for the unicorn talk

You could call them the unicorn vigilantes. And they have a message for the big startups looking to make the move from private investment havens to public markets: Stay away from Wall Street until you get your act together. Much like the so-called bond vigilantes of the 1980s and ’90s—they started selling when they saw signs of inflation, pushing up interest rates even before the Federal Reserve could act—analysts, fund managers, and other investors are showing signs of increased vigilance about all the new equity being pushed onto the stock market. They’re casting suspicious looks at the unicorns (the nickname used for startups with private valuations of $1 billion or more) that are losing large amounts of money. And at those with convoluted corporate ownership schemes and plans for multi-class share…

access_time5 Min.
maybe at&t isn’t ready for its close-up

Not long ago, an AT&T Inc. executive named Brad Bentley had a novel idea for HBO. Over the years the premium TV network had explored just about every edgy storytelling topic, whether it was the suburban mob bosses of The Sopranos or the incestuous and dragon-riding public servants of Game of Thrones. But Bentley, according to a person familiar with the matter, told network executives in a meeting that the moment had finally come for HBO to expose its millions of subscribers to the one thing that had remained taboo during its 46-year history: commercials. The suggestion didn’t go over well. HBO executives were stunned at the idea of larding down the network’s prestigious programming with ads, no matter how much money it could generate, and pushed back forcefully. “We will…

access_time5 Min.
new alternatives for china’s students

In the heart of Sydney’s financial district, sandwiched between the offices of law firms and fund managers, the smartly refurbished classrooms of King’s Own Institute are ready for a major intake of students. There are banks of white desks and tables lined with Dell computers and Lenovo laptops. But there’s barely an Australian anywhere on campus. With more than 2,400 students—almost all of them from abroad—studying for bachelor’s and master’s degrees in subjects such as business, accounting, and information technology, KOI is at the forefront as schools worldwide pursue Chinese students who increasingly are seeking alternatives to studying in the U.S. China Education Group Holdings Ltd., an operator of nine postsecondary schools across six Chinese provinces, announced the A$128 million ($86 million) purchase of KOI on Sept. 23, a deal that…

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