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category_outlined / Boating & Aviation
Classic BoatClassic Boat

Classic Boat

March 2019

Admire the world's most beautiful boats, brought to life through breath-taking photography. Classic Boat offers a unique blend of yacht reviews, seamanship and restoration features, history and design columns, practical advice and coverage of the leading international regattas and events. Whether your interest lies in working on restoration projects or sailing in classic regattas; whether you're a wooden boat owner or simply an admirer of traditional marine workmanship, Classic Boat will have something for you.

Country:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Publisher:
Chelsea Magazine
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

access_time1 min.
remain on board…

I was perched on the rail of a 1920s cutter at a classic regatta last summer, when an unexpectedly large wave nearly threw me off the boat. Going MOB at that precise moment would have landed me in a spot of bother, since the sea state was sizeable, we were on our own on the course and the gaffer I was on wasn’t the most manoeuvrable boat in the pack. And it being a classic regatta, I didn’t have a lifejacket on. Of course, it being a classic regatta, there wasn’t a lifejacket in sight in the whole fleet, not even in the big conditions we had that afternoon. The classic boat world is appealingly laissez-faire on this subject, but perhaps too much so at times. When the owner has…

access_time9 min.
cut from a different cloth

the obligatory S&S dorade boxneat fiitting for boat hookseamless joinerydoghouse port looking forwardsea trials off Hollandowner’s cabin beneath the doghouse gives standing headroom (RON VALENT)Something rather unique has been taking place in the Netherlands over the past few years. Two new, wooden, Sparkman & Stephens designed classic sailing yachts have been simultaneously under construction at two different yards. Both are yawls with very comparable dimensions, 55ft 8in (16.9m) and 56ft 10in (17.3m), and both are copies of previously built yachts. One of them is in Heukelum, where boatbuilder Pieter van der Aa has steadily been working on his own yacht for the past few years. The other was in Enkhuizen, recreated by a team at Ventis Jachtbouw. This yacht, now launched, is the one you see pictured here.Ventis has been…

access_time2 min.
a plate of oysters, the traditional way

2 Tom Haward, of Richard Haward Oysters, in the oyster cutting competition3 Joe Hijazi casts a dredge from the smack Maria4 Hauling a dredge full of natives aboard the smack Peace5 Robbie Lee at the helm of his smack Dorothy with dredges over the side6 Mayfly owner David Whiting (centre) picking up the boat’s prize for having ‘dredged, handled and rigged in the most seamanlike and professional manner’ from local mayor Carl Powling (left) and guest judge Don Rainbird (right)7 Sel Selyuzen, of the West Mersea Oyster Bar, in the oyster cutting competition8 Mark Butler of James Lawrence Sails, regular crew on Maria, enjoys his seafood lunch reward9 A plate of newly cut native oystersEvery year for the last quarter of a century sailing fishing smacks have gathered on the Mersea…

access_time2 min.
at the panerai transat classique start

1 Crew from Xarifa enjoy the gala dinner at Lanzarote’s modern art museum2 Race founder Loïc Blanken, with Cristina Bernardini of Christophe Harbour in St Kitts, the race’s destination port3 The crew of the 1936 Fife Eilean, owned by race sponsor Panerai, get in the mood during the presentation of each crew at the gala dinner4 Alain Cardonnet, from Paris, the race’s oldest competitor at 73 (left), raises a glass with Roger Quenet, skipper of Lys5 “How do you put this thing back together again?” Simon Lochet from Stiren grimaces6 On board Stiren during a trial sail off Marina Lanzarote in Arrecife7 Spain’s most successful offshore sailor, Alex Pella, at the helm of Stiren8 Loïc Blanken (left) talks on stage to Paulo Zangheri, the owner of Coch y Bondhu, with…

access_time10 min.
tell tales

(BOB AYL0TT)Bought for £2,500Former tug boat skipper Rob Mason bought the wreck of a Victorian gaff cutter yacht for £2,500 and over four years of work restored her to the head-turning object you see here. She was designed for racing by Alexander Richardson, whose giant racing yachts of the late 19th century rivalled those by the more famous GL Watson. She was built by Samuel Bond of Birkenhead in 1897. These days she’s engineless once again. Much of Rob’s work was more rebuild than restoration. “I almost gave up,” he admitted.GOLDEN GLOBE RACE 2018And the winner will be…The Golden Globe Race was set for a nail-biting finish, with the two leading boats closing on Les Sables d'Olonne as we went to press. Dutch challenger Mark Slats, on his Rustler 36…

access_time2 min.
q&a

To what degree is Pendennis a classic boat yard?We have a history of many iconic classic projects on the new build and restoration sides. At the same time we excel in mainstream refit. We have a workforce of 430 that has a very broad skillset and can apply its talents to anything from a 1920s classic restoration to a carbon yacht rebuild.Looking at the big classic yacht of yesteryear – is it still truly ‘classic’, with all today’s mod-cons inside?Yes it is. We go to some lengths to respect and protect the design and provenance of a classic yacht. Alongside that, it needs to be running efficiently and safely, comply with modern regulations and be used in the manner the client wants. It is a complex mix of requirements.Is maintaining…

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