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Cyclist Cyclist

Cyclist January 2019

Dedicated solely to road cycling. Cyclist is the very first magazine of its kind. A celebration of the freedom to explore and the gear that makes road cycling special. Cyclist will take you on the world's best routes and get behind the doors of iconic brands. With performance advice from the experts, we unearth tall tales from the pro peloton and get you up-close to the best road bikes and technology. Plus, Cyclist mixes in-depth articles with breathtaking imagery from the sport's best photographers. It's the road cycling magazine you've been waiting for. In every issue you can enjoy: - The most exhilarating cycle routes and sportives in the world - their history, when to go and how to get the best from your trip. - The most in-depth road bike reviews and must-have gear. - Expert opinion on components, training, nutrition and technology. - The stories behind the biggest brand names and most influential people in cycling

Land:
United Kingdom
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Dennis Publishing UK
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CHF 42.27
13 Ausgaben

IN DIESER AUSGABE

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ed’s letter

As a teenager in 1985, I stayed up until the early hours on a Sunday night to watch the final of the World Snooker Championships. It was a blinder: Steve Davis (he of the ‘Interesting’ Spitting Image puppet) had cruised to an 8-0 lead with his blend of precision and unbreakable focus. But Dennis Taylor (he of the upside down glasses) fought back to clinch an 18-17 victory after a final frame that lasted over an hour. Apparently, I was just one of 18.5 million TV viewers in the UK who lost sleep in order to witness the Northern Irishman sink that last black and break Davis’s dominance. Why were there so many of us? It’s not like we were a nation of fanatical snooker players (I certainly wasn’t) and the…

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beneath the skin

Argonaut’s Road Bike doesn’t look remarkable. Nor does it claim to be the lightest, stiffest or most aerodynamic bike around, yet a complete build will set you back a five-figure sum. Why the expense? An Argonaut is custom-made, but not just down to the geometry and paintjob – it’s customised down to the layup of every single carbon ply. Such attention to detail shouldn’t come as a surprise when one learns a little about Argonaut’s founder, Ben Farver. ‘I started making bikes well over 10 years ago – lugged and fillet-brazed steel bikes with an artisan or bespoke premise,’ he says. ‘That evolved into more race-oriented road bikes because that’s what I like riding, but as I continued in Portland, Oregon’s framebuilding scene I became frustrated that I couldn’t totally control…

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madison turbo kit

Jersey £44.99, bibshorts £69.99, madison.co.uk It may break several of the Velominati’s rules, but many cyclists prefer to retire to their garages over winter, seeking to avoid the cold and rain while still getting the miles in on an indoor trainer. For those people, Madison has released some turbo-specific clothing. The new Turbo jersey and bibshorts use highly breathable fabrics with an antibacterial coating that Madison claims will keep the kit hygienic and stink-free even when regularly saturated with sweat. Italian chamois expert TMF has supplied a custom seat pad that is said to be shaped specifically for turbo training, and both garments are totally pared back, forgoing any decoration or additional features such as pockets. Madison says this keeps the kit is as light as possible so it can wick sweat…

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fulcrum racing zero carbon db wheels

£1,799.99, i-ride.com There was a time when if you suggested that a Fulcrum road wheel would one day be equipped for disc brakes and with tubeless clincher tyres, you would have been met by a hostile Italian shrug of disbelief. But here we are. As the flagship in Fulcrum’s line-up, the Racing Zero only evolved to a carbon rim in 2015, but since then has developed quickly to meet the increasing demand for the newest technology. This latest Racing Zero Carbon has a 19mm internal width and comes fitted with a tubeless tyre valve. As well as being wider than its predecessor, the rim has also been reinforced with T800 carbon and a new carbon twill weave that strengthens the spoke eyelets. That doubles up as an attractive design feature, with the…

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mavic comete ultimate helmet

£225, mavic.com A helmet’s job used to be simply to protect the wearer’s head. Now riders expect helmets to be light, aero and well ventilated too, as well as exceeding safety standards. Mavic says its new Comete Ultimate ticks all those boxes. It weighs in at 215g, and Mavic claims it offers a 3-watt aerodynamic saving compared to a conventional helmet, despite the Comete having super-sized vents. The real gem in the crown is a new EPS-4D shell material, which boasts a 30% improvement in shock absorption compared to a regular EPS helmet construction.…

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dl killer vito shoes

£480, dlkiller.cc There aren’t many cycling shoes that cost £480, but then not many are quite so beautifully crafted as the Vitos, which bear the moniker of company co-founder Danilo ‘The Killer’ Di Luca. As you might expect, coming from a former Giro d’Italia winner (albeit one banned for life for doping), the Vito’s carbon soles are stiff, almost incongruously so given the suppleness of the uppers. Yet they are also supremely comfortable. ‘The front half of the foot has freedom of movement due to a wider supporting surface of the hull,’ says DL Killer’s other co-founder, Chris Puttnam. ‘The heel support keeps the foot in alignment, ensuring stability to help with comfort and power efficiency. Most of the time the shoes will feel comfortable straight out of the box, but the…

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