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category_outlined / Angeln & Jagen
Guns & AmmoGuns & Ammo

Guns & Ammo March 2019

Guns & Ammo spotlights the latest models, from combat pistols to magnum rifles...reviews shooting tactics, from stance to sighting...and explores issues from government policies to sportsmen's rights. It's the one magazine that brings you all aspects of the world of guns.

Land:
United States
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
KSE Sportsman Media, Inc.
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ABONNIEREN
CHF 19.87
12 Ausgaben

IN DIESER AUSGABE

access_time1 Min.
january ’07

Stoeger has breathed new life into classic shotgun and pistol designs that are sometimes overshadowed by new releases. For example, Beretta launched the Cougar in 1994 as a compact alternative to the Beretta Model 92 series with a retail of $697. Thirteen years later, the Stoeger Model 8000 Cougar renewed interest in the unique rotary barrel design with a price of $350. ■…

access_time6 Min.
reader blowback

WHAT IS IT? In the January issue, Tom Beckstrand wrote a short article on Crimson Trace’s new red-dot sights and then another feature on Rock River Arms’ new ATH V2, which was shown on the cover. However, the Crimson Trace optic on the cover and in the Rock River feature was not discussed in his column. This seems like a missed opportunity to me.Doyle Hill Email CRIMSON TRACE CTS-1100 ILLUMINATED 3.5X BATTLESIGHT: $550 The image of that optic was a teaser used ahead of the introduction of Crimson Trace’s new line of magnified optics. Great observation skills, Mr. Hill! That’s the new CTS-1100, which is a rugged, fixed 3.5X aluminum sight developed for modern rifles. It contains an illuminated, hybrid reticle meaning that there is a…

access_time3 Min.
fill your hands

(PHOTO: MICHAEL ANSCHUETZ) “STOCKS ON A HANDGUN mate the gun to the hand,” Jeff Cooper wrote in 1974. In those days, the most common material used to equip production guns was wood. These days, most handguns sold feature textured polymer frames that are engineered for less sentimental customers to streamline manufacturing and to increase margins. Handgun designs that require grip panels often appear with synthetics, while solid wood remains reserved for the select few. Wood grips can enhance a pistol’s desirability for some as they connect a shooter with a once-living soul. Now, it’s the trend to embrace interchangeable backstraps and grip panels that attempt to replace the tactile feedback long taken for granted with specially crafted wood-stocked models. As a college freshman, I joined several others as…

access_time1 Min.
the auction block

CASED KYNOCH REVOLVER This very nice condition and scarce double-action British Kynoch revolver realized a very reasonable $6,725, including premiums, at the October 30, 2018, Morphy Auctions sale. The .476-caliber, double-trigger revolver was manufactured at the Kynoch Gun Factory in Aston, United Kingdom, and retains 98 percent of its original finish. It is also fitted in a leather-covered oak case displaying a Kynoch label, which includes an original oil bottle and cleaning rod. For more information about this and future auctions, contact Morphy Auctions ( MorphyAuctions.com  or 877-968-8880). ■…

access_time9 Min.
identification & values

WEBLEY & SCOTT NAVY MODEL MK I, .455 WEBLEY AUTO, 90%: $2,000 WEBLEY & SCOTT MK I Q: I submit for your perusal what one might determine to be the most robust military handgun of all time. Your thoughts and evaluation on such a formidable British firearm are of great interest to me. The markings read in all caps, “WEBLEY & SCOTT Ltd” over “PISTOL SELF-LOADING 455 MARK I N”, dated 1913. There is also a winged logo over “W & S”. It’s in superb condition and mechanically perfect. It would seem that if in the heat of battle, with your ammo running out, you might still be considered armed. I have never seen a pistol that I would rather be struck with less. Thanks for keeping…

access_time1 Min.
hollywood hardware

CINEMIZED GYROJET “THE SILENCERS” (1966) To cash in on the early James Bond craze, Columbia Pictures decided to do a series of films based on the Matt Helm spy novels written by Donald Hamilton. Starring Dean Martin, the movies ended up having little in common with their original source, the hero being depicted more as a boozing womanizer than a hard-bitten agent. The first of the batch, “The Silencers” (1966), was a huge hit and set the tone for the next three to come. Viewed today, they are dated in all the worst ways. Still, the formula works on a certain level, which incorporated a gaggle of — in the vernacular of the time — “groovy chicks” that even outdoes Bond, as well as a good…

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