menu
close
search
ENTDECKENBIBLIOTHEKZEITSCHRIFTEN
KATEGORIEN
EMPFEHLUNGEN
ENTDECKENBIBLIOTHEK
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Familie & Kinder
Living and LovingLiving and Loving

Living and Loving February 2019

Living and Loving Magazine is South Africa’s most trusted source of parenting information from conception to pregnancy, through birth and the baby years. In our fast-paced, modern world, the challenges facing mothers are greater than they’ve ever been, and we’re there to support them every step of their journey. Each month we pack the magazine full of sensible advice and the most up-to-date information from a panel of over 25 of South Africa’s leading baby and child experts.

Land:
South Africa
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Caxton Magazines
Mehr lesenkeyboard_arrow_down

IN DIESER AUSGABE

access_time2 Min.
confessions of a mom

Motherhood is a journey of a thousand “shoulds”. From the moment you think, “I should be taking a prenatal vitamin if I’m trying to fall pregnant”, you're faced with an endless list of ways you need to conduct yourself to be a “good parent”. Some of these beliefs are eminently sensible (like taking prenatal vitamins), others are less so. Your list of "shoulds" is gleaned from the wisdom of books, friends, other mothers (including your own), talk shows and movies – you name it. You never know when you’re going to encounter a should that sticks. And once you’ve picked one up, trust me – it's hard to get rid of. Here’s one of mine. It’s the day my daughter started crèche. As this was her first day of school, I…

access_time2 Min.
you said it...

The same, but different Thirty-seven years ago when I was pregnant, things were so different. Information about childbirth and parenting wasn’t readily available and we didn’t have internet to enable us to find answers to questions and concerns we had. After a difficult childbirth I still couldn’t believe I was able to do it and the fears around how I was going to take care of my baby emerged. But I felt everything that was happening was miraculous and I actually felt so humbled by all the love and care given to me by the doctor and the hospital staff. The best part was that my child was so perfect. The one thing that remains the same is childbirth and parenting are incredible experiences. Lalitha Reddy Phenomenal woman I was raised by a strong woman…

access_time1 Min.
we asked you on facebook…

“Our 22-month-old daughter tipped a whole box of eggs onto the floor while we were shopping. They splattered everywhere. It was embarrassing, but we saw the funny side and at least hubby and I were there together and could work as a team to sort it out. I just wish we had taken a photo.” Angela Lloyd-Evans “My one-year-old pointed at a rather large lady in a purple tracksuit and kept shouting “Barney” while we were waiting in the queue to pay for our month-end shopping.” Janine Muller “My toddler had a blowout while sitting on our friend’s lap and some of the poo ended up on his pants.” Marelize Templeman…

access_time1 Min.
it must be love

PHOTOGRAPHY SUPPLIEDPRICES CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO PRINT…

access_time2 Min.
pregnancy notes

Preventing premature births In 2014, it was estimated that 10.6% of live births globally were preterm and Asian and sub-Saharan African countries accounted for 81.1% of these. A study published in The Lancet and co-authored by staff from the World Health Organization (WHO) and Human Reproduction Programme (HRP) underlines the importance of safeguarding the health and wellbeing of all women and their babies throughout life by ensuring access to high-quality and respectful healthcare services. While many preterm babies survive in high-income countries, their low- and middle-income counterparts have a lack of adequate newborn care that puts their lives at risk. While the causes of preterm births are complex, there are a variety of preventative measures that can be put in place. The WHO recommends key interventions, including counselling on healthy diet and…

access_time4 Min.
when are you due?

Got your due date etched into your mind as clearly as your own birthday? Well, it’s time to un-circle that day on your calendar, and shade in the weeks around it instead. Only around 4% of women deliver on their due date, and there are many variables that may affect whether your baby is likely to arrive a little earlier or a smidge later. So, rather like that takealot.com courier who’s supposed to be delivering your new cot sometime between 8am and 8pm, you should be thinking about your due range rather than a specific day. “The emphasis on a single due date may make the length of pregnancy seem predictable,” says fertility, pregnancy and infant health expert Anne Marie Jukic. Her research has found pregnancy can be anything from 35…

help