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category_outlined / Angeln & Jagen
NZ HunterNZ Hunter

NZ Hunter Issue 71

New Zealand’s premier hunting and outdoor magazine . For everything hunting - adventures, tips, how-tos, and reviews of the latest products. A great read with something for everyone.

Land:
New Zealand
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
NZ Hunter Magazine Ltd
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ABONNIEREN
CHF 25.02
6 Ausgaben

IN DIESER AUSGABE

access_time3 Min.
a word from the editor

The first real bite of winter is hitting the hills as I write this. The roar is well and truly over, and we’re into our planning of the cold months ahead now. We had an awesome sojourn in the Greenstone after Fallow, we’ve done our first sortie after Rusa, and have tahr rut, winter Red stags and of course waterfowl to hunt and film over the next few months. There’s been so much going on politically over the last year that had/still has the potential to seriously affect what we do. The on-going tahr cull issue and the firearms law changes are the two biggies, but Battle for the Birds, TB and pest free NZ, and the ZIP operations are also either having a significant affect, or in the case of…

access_time3 Min.
q&a

HEY GREG I have a couple of quick questions regarding the Tikka .270 that has featured in a couple of episodes this season. What length is the barrel? It looks quite short. With the shortened barrel what range do you confidently shoot? Do you find the shortened barrel reduces the velocity of the projectile? I have a standard Tikka .270 with a Gunworks suppressor fitted. I never shoot further than 500 yards and that is a rarity. I use factory Hornady ammunition with130gr and 145gr projectiles. I would like to shorten the barrel for when I am in the thick stuff - that is only if I can still accurately and effectively hit an animal at 4-500 yards Thanks in advance. By the way love the conservation focus that is really being emphasized…

access_time10 Min.
speculation tahr

We were thinking about going to the West Coast, as we had done a few tahr trips over the past years but mostly on the eastern side. A couple of weeks later we got in touch with Dylan, a mate who lives in Ross on the West Coast and the three of us decided to have a crack at a ballot. In November we found out we were unsuccessful in the first draw but in the second draw later that month we got a third period block in the Adam’s Wilderness area – Speculation Creek for 11th May 2018. Game on! After a long winter I was not quite as fit as I could be and I knew if I was going to keep up with half-goat man Dylan, I had to…

access_time6 Min.
pear shaped

Over a few beers we decided to check out some Central Otago country I’d always wanted to look over. Central is great in that most of the weather that wrecks hunting along the main divide is not much more than wind by the time it gets to those great tussock clad expanses. We hadn’t anticipated any 4WDing and had pinched mum’s ute for the long road trip that is Waikato to Southland, so we bought some chains as a precaution. In the end clearance was more of an issue so we left the ute parked before any major hills. In my experience, getting yourself one ridge away from huts, tracks and other things that attract hunters doubles your chances of success. With that in mind we climbed 400m up and over…

access_time11 Min.
east coast trifecta

What on earth is that roaming on the riverbed? After weeks of scouring over Google Maps for potential east coast public land to target, we selected an area where we thought we could achieve the ‘east coast trifecta’ – a bull tahr, a chamois and a Red stag. With all our gear packed we made the arduous journey south along the Kaikoura coast to Christchurch where we met up with the rest of our hunting party and continued on to the helicopter pad. With a few first-timers on this trip we decided to take two choppers in, which meant we could live like kings, basing ourselves out of one of the many huts available to hunters. At the top of the list was 100kg of coal to dry our gear, given…

access_time6 Min.
a greenhorn on murray river

Stories of Whitetail deer had been drawing my interest since I’d lived in Invercargill and I was eager to experience the hunting that Rakiura had to offer. Booking a hunting block was easy, and the Department of Conservation website had all the information I needed. DoC also collected the $30 charge that would go to the Rakiura Hunters’ Camp Trust – a branch of the Southland Deerstalkers’ Association. The money is used to maintain a suite of tidy hunters’ huts throughout the island. And with that I was off, catching the Stewart Island ferry from Bluff to Oban and then a shuttle from Oban to the start of the Rakiura Track. Then I shouldered my pack for the walk in to the Murray block on the northern coast of Rakiura. A night…

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