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Trains November 2020

TRAINS IS THE #1 MAGAZINE AMONG RAILROAD ENTHUSIASTS! EACH ISSUE IS PACKED WITH PROBING FEATURES, RAILROAD NEWS, EXPERT COMMENTARY, CUTTING-EDGE INDUSTRY REPORTS, DETAILED MAPS AND SPECTACULAR PHOTOGRAPHY COVERING RAILROADING’S INFLUENTIAL HISTORY AND EXCITING FUTURE.

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Land:
United States
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
Erscheinungsweise:
Monthly
ABONNIEREN
CHF 39.41
12 Ausgaben

in dieser ausgabe

1 Min.
from the editor

Jim Wrinn jwrinn@kalmbach.com @TrainsMagazine @trains_magazine Happy birthday to us! Welcome to Trains’ 80th anniversary issue. We’re excited about the stories and photos that help express our joy in producing this magazine for you every month. Many of you were planning to join us for an anniversary dinner we had planned for Trains hometown of Milwaukee, Wis. Due to the pandemic, it’s postponed. We hope to reschedule it. We still plan to operate our photo charter with Soo Line Mikado No. 1003, so we’ll still celebrate in appropriate fashion. As we enter our 81st year, we’ll continue to write about the business as well as the fun of railroading with equal gusto. Here’s to the next 80 years of Trains — who knows what it will be in the year 2100, but I guarantee this:…

3 Min.
clément michel

SIX PRIVATE-SECTOR transit operators came together this year to form the North American Transit Alliance, aiming to promote innovation and adding their voice to discussions in this essential aspect of the economy. Trains spoke with Clément Michel, CEO of Keolis North America, one of the founding member companies. Q Why was the NATA formed at this time? A I felt that there was a conversation that was not necessarily happening at the right level and where [transit] agencies were not harvesting enough of the wealth of knowledge from the private sector. The potential of the private sector is bringing the international benchmark. [The American Public Transportation Association] is doing a terrific job, but we feel that there is a need for this advocacy for the private sector, and also to insure that some…

4 Min.
triweekly plan puts states in a bind

THANKS TO $1 BILLION in pandemic relief provided by Congress, Amtrak was able to maintain daily service on its far-flung national network through Sept. 30. This, in turn, permitted financially strapped states to drop some frequencies without completely decimating transportation utility. Now, Amtrak’s intention to cut most long-distance trains to three departures per week in October [see “Long Distance: Stable, Snubbed,” “News,” October 2020] leaves regional operating authorities with tough decisions. Short-distance revenues are creeping upward, but in July remained 82.9% below year-ago levels. Regional operators must choose between filling gaps in service or settling for a schedule with fewer offerings, which could stunt a return to relevance for their corridors. A further complication is whether states will wind up paying more under Amtrak Performance Tracking cost-allocation formulas because there will be…

1 Min.
news photos

1 Min.
news briefs

Operation of Ontario’s GUELPH JUNCTION RAILWAY transferred from ONTARIO SOUTHLAND to Genesee & Wyoming’s GODERICH-EXETER RAILWAY on Aug. 31, 2020. Above, a Guelph Junction train delivers G&W units to Guelph prior to the change of contract operators on Aug. 27. Stephen C. Host In its most recent quarterly update on positive train control, the FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION warned that NJ TRANSIT and New Mexico’s RAIL RUNNER EXPRESS remain at risk of missing the Dec. 31, 2020 deadline for PTC implementation. As of August, Rail Runner had no PTC milage in operation. Separately, with the completion of work on 1 mile of track in its Chicago terminal, AMTRAK reported it had finished PTC implementation on all mileage it owns or controls. Unions won two significant court decisions in late August, with a federal…

3 Min.
fans in the industry

bybillstephens@gmail.com @bybillstephens Blog: TrainsMag.com/obstower I was schmoozing with railroad officials, consultants, and shippers at a cocktail hour in New York City when a young woman from an adjacent event walked up, introduced herself, and asked what the group did for a living. “We’re railroaders,” came the reply. She was dumbfounded. You’d think the railroaders had said they raise dinosaurs. The young woman is not alone in thinking that railroading is an outmoded industry. Many people have no idea what a railroad is, what it does, or that the industry is as vibrant as it is vital. And so they don’t consider a railroad career. That’s too bad because railroads need more bright minds. Katie Farmer, BNSF’s executive vice president operations, drove home this point recently. The two most important issues facing railroads over…