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Trains October 2017

TRAINS IS THE #1 MAGAZINE AMONG RAILROAD ENTHUSIASTS! EACH ISSUE IS PACKED WITH PROBING FEATURES, RAILROAD NEWS, EXPERT COMMENTARY, CUTTING-EDGE INDUSTRY REPORTS, DETAILED MAPS AND SPECTACULAR PHOTOGRAPHY COVERING RAILROADING’S INFLUENTIAL HISTORY AND EXCITING FUTURE.

Land:
United States
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
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2 Min.
stacks: coal trains of our age

“Intermodal” is the title of an “On Location” video series from the late 1990s and early 2000s that we are updating. In preparing the script, I learned that intermodal accounts for a whopping 40 percent of Union Pacific’s traffic. UP and BNSF Railway are the two biggest carriers of intermodal. UP handles 71,000 containers each week — but get this, BNSF surpasses that number with a whopping 93,000 containers. Yes, each week. Not long ago export and power plant coal moving in unit trains were the majority of the traffic across the continent. Coal trains out of Wyoming were everywhere. Now, as I travel the country, I see mostly intermodal trains and few merchandise and unit trains of other cargos. A coal train has become a rarity on some main lines.…

1 Min.
railway post office

AUGUST COVER PHOTO When nearly 900 Americans are killed or injured trespassing on railroad tracks each year, the decision by Trains magazine to use on the cover of its August 2017 issue a photo of the last Ringling Bros. circus train on a trestle in West Virginia that shows people walking in the ballast next to the locomotive is concerning. On behalf of Operation Lifesaver Inc., the national rail safety education group, and all the families who have lost loved ones to track trespassing, I am writing to let you know the photo sends the wrong message to your loyal readers. What’s more, the cover was published not long after the news broke of a teen in Virginia who was hit and killed while walking with family members on a railroad trestle. Photos…

4 Min.
end of an erie

Poor Erie. After 106 years of producing locomotives for the world, the final finished locomotive is expected to roll out of General Electric’s Lawrence Park, Pa., plant east of Erie, Pa., sometime in 2018. The announcement rocked Pennsylvania communities and generations of faithful GE motive power fans who’ve come to know and respect the status “Erie-built” locomotives command on railroads the world over. What comes next after the July 27 announcement is uncertain. GE officials have yet to say how many of the existing export locomotive orders on the books will be built in Erie, or how quickly the transition to the company’s newer plant in Fort Worth, Texas, will be. And the GE proposal is subject to final negotiations with local unions. Current international orders include 100 ES30ACi locomotives for Egypt and 20…

1 Min.
n p

MIDWEST TO THE KEYSTONE QUIET HONOR RED FOR READING…

5 Min.
don’t know much about trains and tracks

Before writing this column, I dug back through a lot of my old columns and stumbled across one from eight years ago. That isn’t “old,” but I learned that I was pretty smart in those days. I said that non-railroaders and non-railfans know only two things about the history of railroading, that steam locomotives gave way to diesels and that the passenger train has had some ups and downs. Don’t bother to try to explain anything else to non-railroaders and non-railfans. (There are exceptions, of course, like the families of railroaders.) For instance, if you try to explain that steam locomotives went through generations of improvements for more than a century, or that diesels today are far superior to the machines that took over from steam in the 1940s and 1950s,…

3 Min.
thune on infrastructure

U.S. Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., Chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, is a key player in legislation affecting the railroad industry. In 2015, he sponsored the Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act, and played a major role in shaping the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act. One of his first public sector jobs was South Dakota’s railroad director. QWhen are we going to see an infrastructure bill in Congress? AWe heard from [Transportation Secretary] Elaine Chao in testimony that they would have something formal in the fall. They’ve asked us for our ideas, and we’ve given them some stuff. I suspect they will make some kind of plan at some point in the future. But if I were a betting man, unless it’s done in the context of tax reform,…