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Trains October 2018

TRAINS IS THE #1 MAGAZINE AMONG RAILROAD ENTHUSIASTS! EACH ISSUE IS PACKED WITH PROBING FEATURES, RAILROAD NEWS, EXPERT COMMENTARY, CUTTING-EDGE INDUSTRY REPORTS, DETAILED MAPS AND SPECTACULAR PHOTOGRAPHY COVERING RAILROADING’S INFLUENTIAL HISTORY AND EXCITING FUTURE.

Land:
United States
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
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2 Min.
impressive in the desert

As Chip and Leslie Savoye describe on pages 54-61, Raton Pass is a time capsule of railroading that is impressive in the desert and thrilling in the mountains between Albuquerque, N.M., and Trinidad, Colo. The rapid fire rat-a-tat rhythm of Amtrak’s Southwest Chief rolling on jointed rail near Las Vegas. The struggle on a 3.5-percent grade to reach the summit at Raton. The classic semaphore and searchlight signals. They’re are all hallmarks of railroading that is at least 60 years out of date. But time is relentless, especially on the railroad, and it is time for Amtrak to decide whether to spend millions to upgrade this route with the help of other government agencies or install a bus bridge to replace the Raton and Glorieta pass segments of this Chicago-Los Angeles route.…

6 Min.
disaster in durango

Railroading in the Rocky Mountains has always been for the stouthearted and this summer, Colorado’s Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad remembered that lesson the hard way. Since June, the iconic narrow gauge railroad has dealt with wildfires, mudslides, and washouts that shut down the line for weeks at a time. Closures have resulted in the railroad missing out on revenue from an estimated 40,000 passengers in two months. Area businesses are estimated to have lost more than $34 million. Recent events have also forced the steam-powered railroad to re-evaluate its reliance on coal and what it will do in the future as hot and dry summers become the rule in southwest Colorado. “Because of long-term drought conditions and changing climate patterns in southwestern Colorado, the [Durango & Silverton] must constantly evaluate and…

1 Min.
ns crashes in pittsburgh

No one was hurt after a Norfolk Southern intermodal train bound for Chicago derailed on top of a light rail line near a major tourist attraction in the Steel City Aug. 5. The 7,687-foot-long, 57-car train crashed near the T light rail stop for the Station Square shopping and gambling complex. The complex includes and surrounds the former Pittsburgh & Lake Erie depot in Pittsburgh. A railroad representative said it could take as much as 72 hours to clear the wreck. Transit officials had yet to access their tracks and station to repair any damage as of press time.…

1 Min.
union pacific rail shipments from japan to cost at least $4 million more

Port officials in California estimate that the cost of Union Pacific’s latest shipment of extra-long rail increased by $4 million, based on a recently imposed 25-percent tariff on imported steel. UP has been importing 480-foot-length rail from Nippon Steel and Sumitomo Metal’s Yawata works in Japan for nearly four years aboard the Pacific Spike ship. The ship sails with up to 20,000 metric tons of rail about six times a year through San Francisco Bay and then up the San Joaquin River to Stockton, Calif. The rail segments are longer than what are available in North America, and so are less susceptible to flaws introduced in rail welding. The 623-foot cargo ship Pacific Spike, built specifically to carry long rail, entered the bay May 4 but remained there until June 13…

2 Min.
obituary

Jim Shaughnessy Photographer Of all the pioneers who revolutionized railroad photography in the postwar decades, few equal the status of Jim Shaughnessy, as measured by his powerful images from the steam-to-diesel era of the 1950s and 1960s. Shaughnessy died Aug. 7, after a long illness. He was 84. Generally considered part of railroad photography’s “big three” — the others being Philip R. Hastings and Richard Steinheimer — Shaughnessy was a fearless artist who got in and around railroading as few others did. He led the shift away from simple train pictures to depictions of the railroad environment. “Jim sought to contextualize the engines and trains he loved into a broader framework that spoke less about hardware and more about their role in everyday life,” says author and photographer Jeff Brouws, who wrote a lengthy…

3 Min.
tell me a story

I enjoy good storytelling, as there is so little of it. Even better is if the narrative accompanies arresting photography. But first, tell me a story. For you, five books dear to my heart. Mixed Train Daily, by Lucius Beebe. Boston-bred Beebe, chronicler of café society for the New York Herald Tribune, invented the railfan picture book with his 1938 “High Iron: A Book of Trains.” But this book is his triumph, a psalm to shortline railroading after World War II. Despite his Yankee upbringing and urban veneer, Beebe adored little railroads of the South. Beebe’s uncommon rococo style was sometimes over-ornamental. But when he describes obscure railroads below the Mason-Dixon Line, I find almost every sentence quotable. The book is also packed with the best photography from Beebe’s longtime companion,…