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All-Star Electric Trains

All-Star Electric Trains

All-Star Electric Trains

This new 100-page collectors edition celebrates Classic Toy Trains' 30th anniversary with an all-new collection of exclusive articles and photos for O and S gauge toy train collectors, operators, and admirers. All-Star Electric Trains features never before seen photos and content including eight of the greatest layouts, rare and unusual trains, trendsetting products, and so much more!

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
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DANS CE NUMÉRO

2 min.
celebrating 30 years of classic toy trains and our hobby

Welcome to All-Star Electric Trains, the seventh of an ongoing series of special-interest publications developed by the editorial and art teams at Classic Toy Trains magazine. All of us who contributed to this 100-page tribute to CTT and the hobby of collecting and operating toy trains take pride in what we have spent so long researching, writing, and designing for your information and enjoyment. What makes All-Star Electric Trains special and meaningful is how it affords us the opportunity to look back at where our favorite leisure activity has gone since Classic Toy Trains made its debut in the autumn of 1987. Both the magazine and the hobby have grown in depth and value over the past three decades. In the various articles, we can look at that evolution and honor…

2 min.
herb lindsay

In the three decades since Classic Toy Trains was launched in the autumn of 1987, the magazine has showcased the most attractive and smoothest operating toy train layouts. In this publication we salute six outstanding and innovative modelers who have inspired all layout builders to achieve more. These individuals, besides having superb artistic and technical skills, stand out for one of two reasons. They have devoted their time and energy to upgrading a single layout over many years, or they have developed a few layouts. CTT has spotlighted them before, so it’s time to summarize their contributions. HERB AND DAGMAR LINDSAY’S O GAUGE NEW YORK CENTRAL & PENNSYLVANIA RR The 25 x 26-foot O gauge layout built by Herb Lindsay with assistance from his wife, Dagmar, made its debut in the April 1990…

3 min.
josef lesser

JOSEF LESSER’S O GAUGE JL/AT&SF RY. The large quantity of letters and photographs arriving at the editorial offices of Classic Toy Trains after the magazine had turned its spotlight on Herb and Dagmar’s O gauge layout took Editor Dick Christianson by surprise. Keep in mind that the Lindsays’ railroad had not been the first showcased in CTT. Clearly, however, much about it caused readers to respond in a positive fashion. They really liked the concept behind the New York Central & Pennsylvania RR and respected how Herb and Dagmar had developed their track plan and added scenery. Dick knew from the start that the Lindsays’ magnificent layout was influencing readers, regardless of their experience in the toy train hobby and the resources available to them. Realism was, he understood, changing the nature…

16 min.
sole survivor: lionel 1951 cheerios contest layout

Advertising agencies and pubic relations firms were not shy about exploiting a simple gimmick in the 1940s and ’50s. They offered all sorts of prizes in exchange for contestants explaining in a specified number of words why they liked a particular product. More than once during the postwar period, the prizes offered in various contests included finished layouts or cataloged sets from Lionel. One well-known example was the contest sponsored by General Mills in 1959 in order to promote Cocoa Puffs, the company’s brand-new breakfast cereal. Eight years earlier, General Mills had collaborated with the Pullman Co. and the Lionel Corp. to publicize another cereal already popular with children. In 1951, a total of 25 lucky winners whose explanation impressed the judges would be awarded with a Lionel 8 x 8-foot O…

23 min.
building the layouts millions loved

An innovative toy train display open to the public can shape the visions and plans of a generation of hobbyists. O gauge enthusiasts still talk about the scenes on the immense railroad that once filled the Lionel showroom in New York City. American Flyer proponents reminisce about the great S gauge layouts at the Gilbert Hall of Science in the postwar era. Looking for the contemporary equivalent of these magnificent miniature railroads? Consider the multiple-level displays of O and S gauge and HO scale trains originally sponsored by Citicorp in New York City and later by Dunham Studios. Millions of people – with varying degrees of interest in model railroading – have visited what layout designer Clarke Dunham originally named Citibank Station and then The Station at Citigroup Center. The awesome landscapes,…

14 min.
the master of lionel displays

Among the many former Lionel employees Classic Toy Trains profiled in the 1990s, Jack Kindler stood out for his warm personality and sharp sense of humor. Between 1946 and 1964, he was involved with everything done at Lionel’s corporate headquarters in Manhattan. Requests were ongoing Jack recalled how requests for displays using Lionel products arrived at the office all the time. Individuals and groups wanted one-of-a-kind O-27 and O gauge layouts filled with trains and accessories. Men at the helm generally farmed out the assignments. They contacted the Lionel plant in northern New Jersey and, in the 1940s and ’50s, also called on outside agencies for aid, such as Diorama Studios. Still, the growing number of layouts needed to satisfy top merchandisers, television producers, and others required the staff in New York City to…