Aviation et Bateau
Boat International

Boat International

June 2020

Boat International is the number one magazine in the international superyacht market. Launched in 1983 it has been the voice of record charting the superyacht industry for over 25 years and is the globally acknowledged authority in its field. The world's only monthly superyacht magazine, Boat International delivers exclusive and unrivaled coverage of power and sail yachting from the world's best journalists and photographers.

Pays:
United Kingdom
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Boat International Media
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12 Numéros

dans ce numéro

1 min.
editor’s letter

There’s nothing like a bit of self-isolation to inspire some novel thinking. When we saw boat show after boat show being cancelled in the face of Covid-19, we decided to launch our Virtual Boat Show – take a look at boatint.com/vbs . Here you’ll find stories of new-build superyachts, insight from brokers and, most importantly, plenty of beautiful boats to inspect – all from the comfort of your own sofa. Meanwhile, when in-person interviews became impossible, we started a video series featuring conversations with owners and industry CEOs – head to boatint.com/athome for more. We’re constantly innovating online, but it’s still comforting in these turbulent times to feel the heft of a BOAT International in your hands. The winners of our annual Ocean Awards certainly deserve the consideration of a…

3 min.
contributors

Claire Wrathall London-based Claire writes about art, design, philanthropy and travel, mostly for the Financial Times and Christie’s Magazine . For this issue, she gives us the lowdown on the winners of our Ocean Awards ( page 92 ). What impressed you the most about this year’s winners? They’re all inspiring, but I do think Eric Quayson of Wildseas deserves a special shout-out for risking his life to save a leatherback turtle from being slaughtered What would you change about the superyachting world? In a perfect world we’d see the end of diesel, and motor yachts would run on hydrogen fuel cells The most interesting subject you’ve ever interviewed? Francis Ford Coppola, a giant among men, with whom I discussed a huge range of subjects: Russian literature, Italian films, Central American jungle, family, food and winemaking. We…

1 min.
let there be light

More than a year after Luminosity got a taste of the Mediterranean Sea in Tuscany, builder Benetti is lifting the veil on this 107-metre six-decker with a volume of 5,844GT. The inspiration was a beach house with bright, art-filled interiors and panoramic views. The beach club ( pictured ) features two pools, a gym and a hammam, and the yacht is filled with cutting-edge tech that operates everything from interactive art to security and diesel-electric propulsion. The exterior, a collaboration between Azure Naval Architects and Zaniz Jakubowski, was refined by Giorgio Cassetta. Don’t miss a deeper dive into this ambitious project in our summer issues. benettiyachts.it…

2 min.
smooth sailing ahead?

The market for sailing superyachts has been under pressure for some time; their market share in the new-build sector is currently just six per cent. In 2019, 21 yachts with a total length of 704 metres were delivered to owners. Back in 2010, that number stood at 41 yachts (1,545 metres) and in 2012 it was 38 (1,335 metres). By 2014, it had fallen to just 24 yachts (794 metres), and in the last three years, an average of 22 yachts per year have been delivered. This is a trend that doesn’t look to be changing: according to BOAT International data, between 2020 and 2023, 59 sailing superyachts will be launched. However, Michael Schmidt, former owner of Hanse Yachts and founder of YYachts, believes that a counter-trend will soon set in.…

1 min.
eye opener

Jason deCaires Taylor’s underwater sculptures are alive with meaning – and they’re also alive in a more literal sense: created beneath the sea in locations across the world, his “museums” double as artificial reefs. The British artist’s work draws on the Land Art movement of the 1960s, which created art in and from the natural environment, and also embodies the concept of art as a form of activism. Taylor’s work certainly represents man’s destruction of the marine environment in a conventional way – with sculptures such as Photo Op , shown here at his underwater Museo Atlántico in Lanzarote, representing society’s obsession with documentation and how that bleeds into voyeurism. It’s an issue that afflicts reefs as tourists crowd in and gradually destroy the very wonders they came to see. But what’s…

5 min.
news

Soaring takes flight The 68-metre Abeking & Rasmussen superyacht Soaring has been handed over to her owner after completing sea trials in the North Sea. The yacht was presented to her owner at a modest delivery celebration on account of the coronavirus pandemic. Named after a soaring eagle, the boat was penned inside and out by Focus Yacht Design, which describes her as a “custom-made floating home that leaves nothing to be desired”. Soaring ’s sundeck has a bar and spa pool, while a beach club, gym, steam room and swim platform can be found on the lower deck. She has been listed for charter with Ocean Independence and will be available once international travel restrictions have been lifted. abeking.com Design Q&A: Jarkko Jämsén Your big break? The chance to design the Finnish presidential…