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FrameFrame

Frame May - June 2019

Frame is a bi-monthly magazine dedicated to the design of interiors and products. It offers a stunning, global selection of shops, hospitality venues, workplaces, exhibitions and residences on more than 224 pages. Well-written articles accompanied by a wealth of high-quality photographs, sketches and drawings make the magazine an indispensable source of inspiration for designers as well as for all those involved in other creative disciplines.

Pays:
Netherlands
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Frame Publishers
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28.04 CHF
6 Numéros

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frame

EDITORIAL For editorial inquiries, please e-mail frame@frameweb.com or call +31 20 4233 717 (ext 921). Editor in chief Robert Thiemann – RT Managing editor Floor Kuitert – FK Head of content Peter Maxwell – PM Editor Anouk Haegens – AH Web editor Rab Messina – RM Editor at large Tracey Ingram – TI Junior editor Lauren Grace Morris – LGM Copy editors InOtherWords (D’Laine Camp, Donna de Vries-Hermansader) Design director Barbara Iwanicka Graphic designers Zoe Bar-Pereg Shadi Ekman Translation InOtherWords (Donna de Vries-Hermansader) Contributors to this issue John Jervis – JJ Ana Martins – AM Shonquis Moreno – SM Alexandra Onderwater – AO Luke Pearson – LP Anna Sansom – AS Laura Snoad – LS Jane Szita – JS Lauren Teague – LT Amy X. Wang – AXW Cover Holo-Scandinavian by Six N. Five (see page 18) Photo courtesy of Six N. Five Lithography Edward de Nijs Printing Grafisch Bedrijf Tuijtel Hardinxveld-Giessendam PUBLISHING Director Robert Thiemann Brand and marketing manager Leah Heaton-Jones leah@frameweb.com T +31 20 4233 717 (ext 951) Marketing intern Sherry Shi Distribution and logistics Nick van Oppenraaij nick@frameweb.com T +31 20 4233 717…

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experience 3.0

Google ‘photos of Woodstock’ and marvel at the whirlwind metamorphosis undergone by music festivals since 1969. The mother of all festivals took place on the rolling hills of a farm in upstate New York, where some 400,000 people gathered to listen to artists like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Joe Cocker, and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young. The celebration, billed as ‘three days of peace and music’, ultimately included a fourth day. Photos of the happening – most of them in black and white – reveal a great mass of what seem to be ecstatic music lovers, many half naked, dancing, happy, radiating love, often sporting groovy tie-dyed threads. Photos of the two stages are harder to find, but I did come across a few images of scaffolding, painted tent canvas and…

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contributors

Born in Beijing and raised in Phoenix, AMY X. WANG is a writer and journalist currently living in New York City. As a staff reporter at Rolling Stone, she covers everything from the record industry to the digital revolution’s impact on the music business and the monetization of creativity. Her writing has appeared in Quartz, The Atlantic, Slate and The Economist. Wang has a BA in English from Yale University. On page 158, she explains how the design of Drake’s latest tour makes the live music experience more democratic. After graduating with honours in English from the University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, VICTOR DLAMINI began his career as a reporter at the Sunday Tribune in KwaZulu-Natal. Inspired by written language throughout his life, the Johannesburg-based jack of all trades now works as…

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six n. five visualizes a new horizon for furniture design

FURNITURE – Spanish studio Six N. Five has built its business on making 3D visualizations of objects and interiors for the likes of Space10, Samsung and Massimo Dutti, all rendered in its trademark aesthetic – formally hyperreal but atmospherically dream-like. The studio’s ambition to pursue more passion projects, coupled with the realization that its portfolio had acted as an ad hoc education in furniture design, inspired creative director Ezequiel Pini to create Six N. Five’s first in-house collection: Holo-Scandinavian. Developed in collaboration with Brazilian product designer Artur de Menezes, the pieces are an on-brand mix of futurism and functionalism, with strong mid-century silhouettes upholstered in what appears to be a heat shield-like material, as if each item were designed to withstand interplanetary travel. It’s a supple, otherworldly series that feels…

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benjamin hubert designs a first-class alternative for economy aircraft seating

MOBILITY – Those who fly economy know all about the physical recovery period that follows. Discomfort aside, more people are flying than ever before: in 2017, the International Air Transport Association reported a record-breaking 4.1 billion passengers worldwide. This growth has led to new cabin innovations, many of which are reserved for first-class and business flyers. But redesign is happening at the economy level, too: maybe you’ve seen Aviointerior’s vertically inclined Skyrider 2.0. Last spring, the saddle-like chair went viral. Reactions were half aghast, half curious: Stand up? For the entire flight? Luckily, Benjamin Hubert of London-based design agency Layer has a more promising alternative in mind. Developed for European aerospace corporation Airbus, Move is the prototype of a new concept for economy-class seating. The design taps into the potential of…

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forget clay: these delftware vases are made from human tissue

BIODESIGN – During the Golden Age, the Dutch East India Company transported millions of items of Chinese porcelain to the Netherlands. Their picturesque appearance and detailed craftsmanship played a key role in the development of the signature style that is associated with delftware. Today, an Eindhoven-based Chinese designer moving in the opposite direction is changing the look and composition of Delft-blue pottery – and this time, it’s personal. Forget clay: Hongjie Yang’s vases are made from human tissue. Yang’s trio of vases – Semi-Human Delft Blue – was recently showcased as part of The Factory of Life, an exhibition at the Centre Pompidou in Paris. The vessels, stained blue with a protein dye, feature human cells grown on biodegradable scaffolds used for cancer research. The pieces are Yang’s straightforward tribute to Dutch…

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