DÉCOUVRIRBIBLIOTHÈQUE
searchclose
shopping_cart_outlined
exit_to_app
category_outlined / Artisanat
Garden RailwaysGarden Railways

Garden Railways August 2018

TAKE YOUR MODEL TRAINS OUTDOORS! GARDEN RAILWAYS MAGAZINE WILL HELP YOU MAKE YOUR BACKYARD COME ALIVE. EVERY ISSUE IS PACKED WITH TIPS ON DESIGNING AND LANDSCAPING YOUR RAILWAY, REVIEWS OF LOCOMOTIVES AND OTHER NEW PRODUCTS – EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW TO CREATE YOUR OWN OUTDOOR RAILWAY.

Pays:
United States
Langue:
English
Éditeur:
Kalmbach Publishing Co. - Magazines
Lire pluskeyboard_arrow_down
Offre spéciale : The week´s top pick!
JE M'ABONNE
32.86 CHF
4 Numéros

DANS CE NUMÉRO

access_time2 min.
finescale modeling

Many garden railroaders, as well as modelers in smaller scales, practice what is known as finescale modeling. The object is to recreate a miniature replica of a full-size object, whether it be simply a chair or a parlor car with complete interior and underbody detail, as closely and accurately as possible. Needless to say, this takes a great deal of time and skill, to say nothing of the years required to develop both the ability and patience to do this kind of work. The end result, though, is almost always extremely impressive to the viewer and immensely satisfying to the modeler. A friend recently directed me to a YouTube video of a TED Talk by Bill Robertson, a Kansas City man who builds “miniatures,” or what we would call models, of…

access_time3 min.
notes & news

PRODUCTS Engines & rolling stock LGB (Märklin) has released a digital “Factory Train” (#L29050) to commemorate LGB’s 50th anniversary in 2018. The prototype of the so-called Factory Train stood for many years in front of LGB’s plant in Nürnberg. The model replicates this train and consists of steam locomotive Nº 99 5606, with etched-metal builder plates separately applied. The locomotive has an mfx/DCC decoder with many digitally controlled functions and sounds, as well as a built-in smoke unit, with steam exhaust synchronized to the motion of the wheels. Operational sounds also work in analog operation. All rolling stock is prototypically painted. The two-axle gondola has hinged hatch covers and a separately applied brake wheel. The two, two-axle boxcars have prototypically arranged brake shoes on the inner surface of the wheels. Price: $1,099.99.…

access_time4 min.
letters

Garden pests I’ve had to deal with squirrels and chipmunks chewing on my outdoor Christmas lights for years. The thing that keeps them away is a critter spray designed for deer and rabbits called Liquid Fence. It has no chemicals in it, being composed of deer blood, garlic juice, and egg. It smells when you apply it but dissipates quickly. Just watch your skin and clothes, unless you enjoy the smell. —Matthew Gaul, pauliewannacrack@hotmail.com 35 years of Garden Railways I was remembering the beginnings of Marc’s vision, 35 years ago, of a magazine dedicated to the new hobby in the US of outdoor trains. LGB had recently appeared in the US and was starting to show up in hobby stores. I received a starter set from my wife for Christmas, purchased at the…

access_time2 min.
video 101

Sharper images A reader named “Aria” wrote, asking how to get sharply focused videos that reveal the road names on his rolling stock. His question appears here: https://bit.ly/2FC0K7k We realized that sharper images of both prototype and model trains challenge our skills and equipment. With professional lighting, cameras that allow control of frame rate, aperture, depth of field, and light sensitivity, sharp focus is demanding but manageable. However, using consumer-level cameras, portable still cameras, and smartphones, with digital post production, my own results were mixed and frankly somewhat disappointing. Trains of any scale pose depth-of-field challenges. A train on a distant horizon can be photographed as a landscape but a train stretching from close-up to a distant view requires lots of light, a small aperture, and a film speed (ISO) high enough to…

access_time8 min.
weathering basics: part 1

Realistic models are one of my passions. Much of the key to that realism comes from weathering. Hobbyists often say they like weathering but have no idea how to do it. Let’s see if I can give you a place to begin. The main reason modelers weather their equipment is to improve realism. Shiny plastic bodies and bright silver wheels don’t look like full-size trains. Even in Europe, where railroad equipment was kept considerably cleaner than that in the US, there’s still a layer of dust and oil on many surfaces. Trains get dirty, so we get to look for ways to recreate that look in miniature. I apologize to the collectors who cringe at the notion of dirtying up a pristine model, but look at it this way—your pristine model becomes…

access_time7 min.
modeling mines and quarries

To hollow out a mine or build a rock quarry is to fall in love with the versatility and artistry of stonework, a more forgiving modeling medium than plants. Thanks to gravity, we can stack natural stones to create stable structures. If the rocks will be subjected to high winds or foot traffic, then mortar, concrete bonding adhesive, or exterior-grade glue will hold it all in place. Here I’ll show how modelers shape hardscape into mine portals and bowl-shaped quarries. Some have stone-supported incline railroads hauling ore; most are fringed in nature’s greenery. Unearthing ore The gravel division of my Agriculture & Gravel Elevated (photo 1) recently expanded to include slate processing for three reasons. First, the slate wagons (GR product review, Feb. 2014) are winners—rusting replicas of those used in Welsh…

help