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Chicago magazineChicago magazine

Chicago magazine February 2018

Since 1970, readers have turned to Chicago magazine for expertise on Chicago’s dining, shopping, and entertainment scenes, as well as for award-winning reporting on the key people and issues in the city. Get your digital subscription to Chicago magazine today.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Chicagoland Publishing Company
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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the “606 effect” on housing prices is real

Even before the elevated trail and park system opened in 2015, people were talking about the 606’s effect on housing prices in the neighborhoods adjacent to it: Wicker Park, Logan Square, and Humboldt Park. Though real estate in these areas is hot in general, some home price analyses indicate that buyers are paying a premium to live close (within two-tenths of a mile) to the trail. Now DePaul’s Institute for Housing Studies has published a report that maps displacement pressure throughout the city, and it shows just how much that premium could affect communities along the 606. Only five census tracts in Chicago carry all three factors that can lead to displacement— high prices, significantly rising prices, and a substantial population of residents vulnerable to that combination—and three of those tracts…

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byrne’s legacy

I was a few weeks shy of my sixth birthday when Jane Byrne became mayor in 1979, and I remember watching the news reports two years later when she moved into Cabrini-Green. I recall being frightened for her safety in a place notorious for its murder rate. Now that I’m nearly the same age Byrne was when elected, what strikes me most about Ben Austen’s tale of Byrne’s stint in the housing project (page 98) is what it must have been like to serve as Chicago’s first female mayor during that era. (Even by the time I entered the workforce in the mid-’90s, gender roles were still far more rigid than they are today.) I can’t help but think that growing up seeing her in action helped define what I believed…

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contributor

Novelist Kim Brooks, author of the forthcoming nonfiction book Small Animals: Parenthood in the Age of Fear, wrote about Eli Finkel’s Relationships and Motivation Lab at Northwestern (page 70). “I’m used to talking with sociologists and therapists about relationships, but a research psychologist was new. I learned a lot about the possibility of recalibration in a marriage—as opposed to assuming there’s just one possible thing to get from it.” BY THE NUMBERS We photographed 17 dishes from seven restaurants for the opener of our feature on takeout food (page 80). The total price of the feast: $215.14. Excluding delivery. BEHIND THE SHOOT Sasha, the 21-year-old cockatoo who once greeted customers at Bel-Port Liquors in Lake View, makes a cameo on page 44. “She likes Kanye West and Lil Uzi Vert,” notes assistant photo editor…

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talk to us

ON A WIDOW’S INSTAGRAM MOURNING Artistic expression is more [productive] than grieving in solitude [“A Year of Grieving Publicly,” January]. No one should pass judgment. Ingrid Goobar-Szleifer on Facebook I started following @anjalipinto years ago for her food and drink photos. Now I follow for her heart-tugging love letters and truths about grief. @morgancolsen on Twitter This is lovely and heartbreaking and brave and thought-provoking. @yodithd on Twitter ON IMPACT-SENSING HELMETS This doesn’t solve the real problem [“The Football Helmet of the Future,” January]. There is no way to avoid movement of the brain when collisions at top speed happen. ST21roochella on Reddit ON THE RESTAURANT BUBBLE It’s a little weird to read an article that posits rising wages for workers as a bad thing [“Is the Dining Boom Over?,” January]. Alex Kemmler on Chicagomag.com CORRECTION In “Top Docs” (January), Arvind K. Goyal’s first…

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women in revolt

Business, politics, real estate, and city life: What you need to know this month Marie Newman has never run for anything, ever, in her 53 years. Not for village board in La Grange, where she lives. Not for the library board. Not even for class president when she was a student at Carl Sandburg High School in Orland Park. Nonetheless, she’s certain she can be the one to finally unseat Dan Lipinski, a seven-term incumbent in the 3rd Congressional District, in the March 20 Democratic primary. She’s not totally nuts to think she can pull it off. Newman is basking in the endorsements of feminist icon Gloria Steinem, New York senator Kirsten Gillibrand, and groups advocating for women, such as NARAL Pro-Choice America and the Feminist Majority Foundation. She’s also running with…

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breaking ranks

Abortion In January, he was one of only three Dems to vote for making the Hyde Amendment, which bans the use of federal funds for abortions, permanent. A month later, he voted to allow state and local governments to withhold federal funds from health care facilities that perform these procedures—like Planned Parenthood. And in October, he voted to prohibit abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Drug testing He was one of four Democrats to support a bill in February that allows states to require drug tests before paying out unemployment benefits. Flood insurance The bill, which withered in the Senate, would have cut federal costs for the National Flood Insurance Program—but would have significantly raised premiums. Immigration He supported bills that called for deporting immigrants with suspected gang ties and established mandatory minimum…

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