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Chicago magazineChicago magazine

Chicago magazine Jan-12

Since 1970, readers have turned to Chicago magazine for expertise on Chicago’s dining, shopping, and entertainment scenes, as well as for award-winning reporting on the key people and issues in the city. Get your digital subscription to Chicago magazine today.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Chicagoland Publishing Company
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12 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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on the web chicagomag.com

CHICAGOANS OF THE YEAR In “Heroes Among Us” (page 84), we honor five locals who are making the city a better place. See them in action in our video profiles at chicagomag.com/coy2011. ROB BUONO, TASTEMAKER The stylish co-CEO of Intelligentsia Coffee tells us about ten items he loves in “Crafts Man” (page 58). Find even more of his favorite things at chicagomag.com/robbuono. Check out online content at chicagomag.com whenever you see this symbol. » OFF THE GRID Dispatches from Chicago’s writers in residence » THE CHASER Our reporter hits the bars and calls the shots. » DEAL ESTATE:® THE BLOG Thrice-weekly updates on the local residential real-estate scene » FELSENTHAL FILES Carol Felsenthal covers politics from the Loop to the Beltway. » SEEN ON THE SCENE Weekly photos from the nightlife front » THE ESCAPE ARTIST Regional travel tips and…

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editor’s note

CHICAGO HAS LONG CONTAINED AN EMBARRASSment of riches—world-class theatre, cutting-edge dining, and amazing galleries among them. But what struck me most when I moved back here in the fall (after two decades of writing and editing at various magazines in New York) was how much more energetic the city felt. From innovative urban planning to new tech ventures, Chicago is exploding with ideas that are making a mark nationwide. My main goal as Chicago’s new editor is to make sure the magazine feels just as vibrant. Building on our 40-year history of outstanding narrative journalism, we’re delivering more must-reads on the serious issues and fascinating people Chicagoans are talking about right now (or should be). And our award-winning writers and editors will continute to curate the area’s best art exhibits, musical…

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contributors

ELAINE GLUSAC “Panama City is the most exciting to me right now,” says freelance writer Elaine Glusac of the ski spots, sun-drenched cities, and beach towns pinpointed in “Where to Go—Now!,” this month’s guide to last-minute winter getaways. “It’s like going to Costa Rica, but at half the price and with half the crowds.” Glusac has written about global travel (and food) for The New York Times and New York magazine, among other national publications, since the mid-1990s. Roscoe Village, however, is her longtime home base. “It doesn’t really matter where a travel writer lives,” she says, “especially with the Internet, a phone, and a passport.” NOAH ISACKSON “Politicians were going on camera saying we’ve got to get rid of gangs, but some of the same politicians work with gangs when…

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feedback

CHICAGO ASKS, FACEBOOK RESPONDS “What do you think of the Bank of America ads on the Wabash Avenue Bridge?” If it means lower taxes for me, I’m all in. —MIKE JENNINGS It’s just a sad commentary. —BOB ILES HATE IT, HATE IT, HATE IT. —CAROL MADEY Terrible and trashy! —JOAN KISTNER What an eyesore. Some things should be left sponsorless. —JANICE M. BROWN No! Chicago can figure out better, more creative ways to make a buck. —SUSAN PERKINS My forehead’s on the market. When can we start advertising on ourselves so we can pay off our student loans? —TREAVOR DOHERTY ON WHETHER ILLINOIS COULD SURVIVE WITHOUT COOK COUNTY And Chicagoans wonder why the rest of the state doesn’t like them? Of course the state would survive without the snobs; it would be like every other Midwestern state without a…

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the future is now

Crusader There’s a new mayor in Bridgeport, and his name is Ed Marszewski. Yes, the Daley legacy still hangs over this South Side stomping ground, an area known in the 1800s as Hardscrabble for its blue-collar residents and in later decades as the home of Richards J. and M. and the Sox. But Mars zewski—owner of the contemporary art gallery Co-Prosperity Sphere; publisher of the art magazines Proximity and Matériel, the left-leaning Lumpen, and the newsletter Bridgeport International; coorganizer of the art fairs MDW and Version; and owner, with his mother and brother, of the bar Maria’s—has his own vision for the neighborhood. He calls it the Community of the Future. And he has blueprints for how to make it happen, beginning with a new brainstorming session Sundays at Maria’s—just don’t…

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making the leap

The idea for my new piece originated with a Picasso sculpture at the Art Institute that made me think, OK, I’d love to be able to do that with human beings. It’s of a man, who’s slightly askew, and a woman: He’s able to lean off balance because she’s holding him steady. In my mind, the sculpture had a slow-motion quality that would lend itself to a circus act, like a strongman duet. “I started thinking about how I could relate acrobatics to dance. I researched tent and variety shows in America in the 1920s, ’30s, and ’40s. These weren’t quite circuses—more like one or two families who would pack up their trucks and their costumes and go from town to town performing, sometimes for a week and sometimes just a…

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