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BBC Music MagazineBBC Music Magazine

BBC Music Magazine

September 2019

BBC Music Magazine is a must for anyone with a passion for classical music. Classical music connoisseurs and new enthusiast alike will enjoy the fascinating features and reviews of over 120 new works in every issue. Please Note: Our digital edition does not include the cover mount items or supplements you would normally find with printed copies

国家:
United Kingdom
语言:
English
出版商:
Immediate Media Company London Limited
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13 期号

本期

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this month’s contributors

Julian Lloyd Webber Principal, Royal Birmingham Conservatoire ‘Elgar’s Cello Concerto carries for me many personal memories and associations. Putting my thoughts on it into words proved to be a very different challenge to playing it!’ Meurig Bowen Artistic curator and director ‘From Gounod’s Ave Maria to scatting Swingles and Wendy Carlos’s Moogs, I’ve always been fascinated by the range of Bach revamps. Are they inspired and enhancing, or gratuitous and unnecessary?’ Sarah Urwin Jones Author and writer ‘I made some surprising discoveries while researching the parents of the great composers, from overbearing fathers and overworked prodigies to secret lessons and a clavichord secreted in the attic.’…

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welcome

There’s a danger that Elgar will never be able to shake off associations with Empire and Establishment. While his Pomp and Circumstance March No. 1 continues to be bound to vigorous Union flag-waving, the composer’s body of music will carry on emanating a sense of nationalism. But Elgar was at his best not in the rousing, cheekychappy bars of those Marches, nor the Cockaigne Overture, but in the darker, introspective pages of the Piano Quintet, the String Quartet, the Cello Concerto – all of them written in 1919. It was a harrowing time. Elgar’s friends were dying, his wife, who supported him through thick and thin, was falling desperately ill. And the country that he loved had been brought to its knees by a war of unspeakable horror. The composer reacted with…

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bbc music magazine

Subscriptions £64.87 (UK); £65 (Europe) £74 (Rest of World) ABC Reg No. 3122 EDITORIAL Plus our favourite JS Bach adaptations Editor Oliver Condy Elgar: Fantasia & Fugue in C minor BWV 537 Deputy editor Jeremy Pound Camerata Brasil: Italian Concerto in F, BWV 971 – Allegro Managing editor Rebecca Franks August Stradal: Trio Sonata No. 4 BWV 528 – Andante Reviews editor Michael Beek Stokowski: Toccata & Fugue in D minor Editorial assistant Freya Parr Brad Mehldau: After Bach Cover CD editor Alice Pearson Gounod: Ave Maria Listings editor Paul Riley Nina Simone: Love Me or Leave Me Art editor Dav Ludford Designer Liam McAuley Picture editor Sarah Kennett Thanks to Daniel Jaffé; Danielle Muldoon MARKETING Subscriptions director Jacky Perales-Morris Direct marketing executive Craig Ramsay ADVERTISING Advertising Sales Director Mark Reen +44 (0)117 300 8810 Advertisement manager Louise Dunn +44 (0)117 300 8813 Sales and partnership manager Rebecca O’Connell +44 (0)117 300 8814 Senior account manager Rebecca Yirrell…

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letter of the month

Shura-fire winner I wholly agree with Martin James Bartlett’s opinion of Shura Cherkassky as a wonderful pianist (Music to my ears, July). His recordings (mostly live) are not so often heard these days, but his recitals, with their Horowitz-like sense of occasion, were always rapturously received, and he was one of only two pianists with whom Horowitz himself played duets, the other being Rachmaninov. In his Evenings with Horowitz (1992), author David Dubal recalls Horowitz’s comments: ‘You know, Wanda [Wanda Toscanini, Horowitz’s wife] can’t play piano good enough to play with me … More pianists live in London now than in New York. And at least there, I can play duets with Shura Cherkassky … I play duets in London. Shura will love it with me.’ I was fortunate enough to…

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have your say…

Victorian splendour Richard Morrison is certainly right to praise music in Victorian Britain (August issue, Opinion). However, he should not so easily dismiss the composers of that period and just single out Elgar. At the recent English Music Festival, we heard the world premiere performance of Stanford’s Violin Concerto of 1873. It is certainly more than good enough to stand beside any of the concertos written in Europe during that period, but has been totally neglected. It has been forgotten that, in his lifetime, Stanford’s symphonies were performed in Germany and also in New York, conducted by Mahler. Morrison also rings true with his comment that studying Elgar in the music schools of the 1970s would have seemed perverse. At the world premiere performance by the BBC Symphony Orchestra and Andrew…

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royal philharmonic society announces relaunch

The Royal Philharmonic Society, the London-based organisation that brought us world-famous works by Beethoven, Mendelssohn and more, has announced a major revamp to increase its membership and raise the prominence of classical music in the UK. The RPS’s changes include a new membership scheme that, with fees beginning at £5 a month, is aimed at encouraging thousands of enthusiasts to explore the world of classical music – in return, members will enjoy benefits such as talks and events involving leading musicians, viewable both live and online. In the long run, the RPS hopes to give itself the sort of prominence enjoyed by the Royal Horticultural Society which today has over 400,000 members and has become a central hub for lovers of all things garden-related. ‘Imagine if Britain had an equivalent to…

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