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category_outlined / 船舶与航空
Motor Boat & YachtingMotor Boat & Yachting

Motor Boat & Yachting February 2019

Published by Time Inc. (UK) Ltd Motor Boat & Yachting is Europe's best motor boating magazine. It's also the oldest, with a history dating back to 1904. Our long experience makes our boat tests the most authoritative in the business and means our technical coverage is without equal. Each month we cover the best new boats on the market, cruising areas that are both practical and inspirational, and the latest boating developments and training. Core editorial focuses on boats up to 80ft, but we also venture beyond the 80ft barrier in our monthly Custom Yachting pages.

国家:
United Kingdom
语言:
English
出版商:
TI-Media
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12 期号

本期

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welcome…

If you’re still recovering from your Christmas and New Year over-indulgences, I apologise now for serving up another rich feast. At least this one won’t cause you to put on any weight; although there’s a slight risk it might make your wallet lose some. That’s because we’ve been busy testing three very different but equally desirable craft. The ‘beauty’ referred to on the cover is the perfectly proportioned GRAND BANKS 60, which thanks to its carbon fibre build and sleek new hull design is finally as good to drive as it is to look at (especially if you opt for the open flybridge model). The ‘beasts’, by contrast, refer not to the other two test boats’ appearances but their characters. The latest TARGA 27.2 is a fearsome weapons-grade SUV of…

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needles & threat

Since starting our annual tradition of testing something out of the ordinary over the Christmas break, we’ve been lucky enough to sea trial some pretty remarkable craft. Firing up the gas turbine on a Royal Navy Type 23 Frigate and punching through 6m waves in Safehaven Marine’s Barracuda SV11 are experiences none of us will ever forget, but even these awe-inspring craft couldn’t match the poignancy of helming the last seaworthy World War 2 Motor Gun Boat almost exactly 100 years after the First World War ended. It wasn’t so much the physical sensations of driving what many historians regard as the Spitfire of the sea but the emotional reactions it triggers. What those brave young men were doing at an age when most of us were still stumbling through college hardly…

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this month’s 10

1 FUNKY NEW POWER CAT TAKES SHAPE An Australian company is hoping to stir up the power cat market with a radical new carbon fibre cruising catamaran. Made at a purpose-built composite specialist in China, the 60ft (18.3m) McConaghy MC59p is constructed using vacuum infusion and pressed panels of E-glass, carbon composite and Corecell for a light yet stiff hull and superstructure. With a pair of 370hp diesels the top speed is said to be 26 knots, though 8-15 knots will be the most efficient speed to maximise cruising range. The layout is based on that of McConaghy’s 60 sailing catamaran but British designer Jason Ker has comprehensively reworked the hulls to account for the heavier engines and higher 1,500-litre fuel capacity to optimise performance of the power cat. On board there are three-or…

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cruising life

This summer we’ll be cruising in Holland, an endlessly fascinating country for anyone keen on boats, ships and travelling by water. Behind the great North Sea dykes is a vast network of picturesque waterways, grand estuaries and rivers, peaceful meers and friendly harbours lined with Flemish houses. You can moor in the heart of famous cities or follow rural canals past neat farms and grazing cows. Yet from offshore there is absolutely no hint of these attractions. Holland’s low, flat coasts are stark and mostly featureless. Often there seems no obvious way in through the defences, despite what is shown on the chart. The East Scheldt estuary is a good example, one of the gateways into the Netherlands for UK boats and, in its strange way, as dramatic a landfall as…

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the boataholic

A boat-owning friend of mine once summed up buying one as “simultaneously the very best, and the very worst, thing I’ve ever done”. I know exactly what he means. It was the penultimate October weekend, shortly before the boat was due to come ashore for the winter. The weather was fantastic, as it had been for most of the season, and the sea state was calm. On Saturday I wandered down to the harbour, pottered across to Brixham to fuel up and then motored into Fishcombe Cove where I picked up a mooring, had lunch and finished a book I’ve been reading on and off all summer. On Sunday Millie joined me mid-morning. Fun, single and gorgeous, Millie has fallen truly madly deeply in love with Smuggler’s Blues 2 (and become…

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motorbikes

I grew up on a farm and was messing about on bikes almost as soon as I could walk. My dad bought me and my brother an old 50cc Malaguti motorbike when I was six. We spent most weekends thrashing about on it, building a makeshift track in the woods. At nine years old I moved up to a 125cc and at 14 I got my first 250cc motocross bike. Off-road riding is a great foundation for all different forms of motorsport; it teaches you to read the terrain, the importance of throttle control and where there is (or isn’t!) traction. You learn through experience and the odd mishap but the only serious crash I had was when I turned 16 and took to the road on a 50cc moped. A…

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