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Techlife NewsTechlife News

Techlife News

#394

Read the most relevant news of the week about the world of technology and its influence on our lives. New products, Apps, acquisitions in the industry, highlights about the digital world and everything about your favorite iGadgets and upgrades. Everything you need to keep well informed. A new concept of light, intelligent, innovative reading at your fingertips. A global view of Tech LifeStyle and its influence on our lives.

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Ivan Castilho de Almeida
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white house launches survey looking for tech industry bias

On the heels of President Donald Trump’s repeated assertions claiming anti-conservative bias by tech companies, the White House has launched an online form asking people to share their experiences if they think political partisanship has led them to be silenced by social media sites.The White House’s official Twitter account tweeted a link to the form Wednesday, saying that “The Trump Administration is fighting for free speech online.”The tweet continues that “no matter your views, if you suspect political bias has caused you to be censored or silenced online, we want to hear about it!”On the first page, the bare-bones online form reads like a tweet from the president, saying that “SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS should advance FREEDOM OF SPEECH. Yet too many Americans have seen their accounts suspended, banned, or…

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self-driving vehicle pulled over by curious police officer

A self-driving shuttle got pulled over by police on its first day carrying passengers on a new Rhode Island route.Providence Police Chief Hugh Clements said an officer pulled over the odd-looking autonomous vehicle because he had never seen one before.“It looked like an oversize golf cart,” Clements said. The vehicle, operated by Michigan-based May Mobility, was dropping off passengers Wednesday morning at Providence’s Olneyville Square when a police cruiser arrived with blinking lights and a siren.It was just hours after the public launch of a state-funded pilot for a shuttle service called “Little Roady.”The shuttle offers free rides on a 12-stop urban loop that links to a train station. Each vehicle holds six people, including an attendant who takes control when the self-driving technology falls short, such as on…

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using a smartphone to sound out sign of kids’ ear infections

Researchers have created a way for a smartphone to “hear” a warning sign of ear infections — fluid buildup behind the eardrum. If it pans out, parents might one day check their tots’ ears at home simply using a phone app and “stuff you have around the house — paper, tape and scissors,” said one of the lead researchers, Dr. Sharat Raju of the University of Washington. Ear infections are one of the most common reasons for pediatrician visits. Even if there’s no infection, fluid that builds up in the middle ear still can be painful and sometimes can muffle hearing enough to affect speech development. Diagnosis is difficult. Usually a pediatrician will peek into the child’s ear to see if the eardrum is inflamed, and parents can buy…

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schools turn to technology to reduce toll during shootings

Efforts to combat the intractable problem of school shootings are starting to shift from preventing the violence to reducing the number of victims through technology that speeds up law enforcement’s response and quickly alerts teachers and students to danger.School districts are using products like gunshot detection systems that identify where shots are fired and apps that allow teachers to report attacks and connect with police. While a focus on gun control often emerges after shootings, technology can be a less partisan solution that’s quick to implement — though some experts say funding preventive mental health resources should be the priority. The tech approach comes amid rising concern over the inability to prevent shootings like the one last week at a suburban Denver high school. Student Kendrick Castillo, 18, was…

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8 days after cyberattack, baltimore’s network still hobbled

More than a week after a cyberattack hobbled Baltimore’s computer network, city officials said Wednesday they can’t predict when its overall system will be up and running and continued to give only the broadest outlines of the problem. Baltimore’s government rushed to take down most computer servers on May 7 after its network was hit by ransomware. Functions like 911 and EMS dispatch systems weren’t affected, officials say, but after eight days, online payments, billing systems and email are still down. Finance department employees can only accept checks or money orders.No property transactions have been conducted since the attack, exasperating home sellers and real estate professionals in the city of over 600,000. Most major title insurance companies have even prohibited their agents from issuing policies for properties in Baltimore,…

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new yellowstone superintendent looks to technology, housing

From worker morale to preservation of the park’s natural wonders, new Yellowstone National Park superintendent Cam Sholly spoke with a singular philosophical theme.“We’re not just providing vacations,” he said. “We’re inspiring people.”Sholly took over as chief Yellowstone administrator last fall, but this week represented his first public sessions in Cody.At a cocktail party Sunday night and at the 69th annual National Parks Day Luncheon on Monday, Sholly laid out his vision for the future for the national park system’s jewel — the one located 50 miles away that is the engine of this area’s summer economy. A career National Park Service employee, Sholly replaced Dan Wenk, who retired, though not on his timetable, after some tense discussions with the U.S. Department of Interior.Sholly went to high school in Gardiner,…

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