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Conde Nast Traveler

Conde Nast Traveler June/July 2016

Condé Nast Traveler magazine is filled with the travel secrets of celebrated writers and sophisticated travelers. Each monthly issue features breathtaking destinations, including the finest art, architecture, fashion, culture, cuisine, lodgings, and shopping. With Condé Nast Traveler as your guide, you'll discover the best islands, cities, spas, castles, and cruises.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Conde Nast US
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8 Issues

In this issue

3 min.
call of the wild

AS THE CHILD OF FOREIGNERS, I would look longingly in the lunchroom at other kids’ PB&J sandwiches on white bread and tiny cans of fruit cocktail, all snug in their Snoopy or Partridge Family lunch boxes. Rolling around the bottom of a reused shopping bag was my Italian grandmother’s interpretation of an American school lunch: a condiment-free roll with a single piece of mortadella or prosciutto hanging out like an untucked shirt, and three pieces of fruit. Later in life, I would come to recognize this sandwich in cafés and tabacchi during my numerous trips to Italy. But in Southern California in the late ’70s, the irreducible panino was sorely lacking in barter appeal. Our family’s foreignness extended to travel. While other families went to Disneyland and Hawaii, to lake houses…

1 min.
martha’s vineyard

THE QUICK-FIRE GUIDE Aquinnah and Gay Head for the best beaches. The Beach Plum Inn & Restaurant, in Menemsha, for rosé at sunset (the town is dry, so it’s BYOB). Larsen’s Fish Market, in Menemsha, for crab cakes (eat them down the road on the public beach). Mad Martha’s, in Oak Bluffs, for two scoops of Lotsa Dough ice cream. State Road, in West Tisbury, for chopped lobster salad and a glass of Roederer Estate Brut. West Tisbury Farmers Market, on Wednesdays and Saturdays. PHOTOGRAPH BY PEDEN & MUNK/TRUNK ARCHIVE. STILL LIFES BY CHRIS GORMAN (7). EARRINGS BY JOSEPHINE SCHIELE. SHIRT/SHORTS: HERMÈS STORES NATIONWIDE. BELT: BALLY.COM. HAT: RAG & BONE STORES NATIONWIDE. SANDALS: SALVATORE FERRAGAMO BOUTIQUES NATIONWIDE. EARRINGS: VANCLEEFARPELS.COM. SUNGLASSES: BULGARI BOUTIQUES NATIONWIDE. BRACELETS: TIFFANY.COM. HANDBAG: SELECT DG BOUTIQUES NATIONWIDE…

2 min.
“i don’t like traveling to a place for a day or two. i like to stay awhile.”

Because I come from an island, I grew up feeling trapped, so now I travel every chance I get. But you have to find a balance between leaving and staying. If you’re always between two planes, it’s hard to have a connection with the people around you. I’m the girl who always feels like she’s losing her ticket or passport. Having a tiny bag to easily access your wallet, boarding pass, and phone is the way to go. This one is from Gucci, and like everyone, I love what’s happening at that house right now. Skinny pants are too tight for traveling. These are from Citizens of Humanity. They’re comfortable and have a kind of vibe. I can do anything while wearing white—I just won’t drink red wine on the plane. But…

1 min.
vacation on repeat

“The journey to Positano is part of the adventure,” says accessories designer Álvaro González, who, every summer, rides a train three hours to Salerno, then catches a charter boat for the 40-minute sail right to the doorstep of his hotel, the small, family-owned Il San Pietro di Positano. “It’s so beautiful to arrive by sea,” he says. “You’re surrounded by cliffs, so it feels very isolated.” Because every minute counts on a weekend getaway, he and his husband, writer Nick Vinson, step off the boat, hand over their luggage to the hotel staff, and claim two loungers under striped umbrellas. Il San Pietro’s private beach has a bar that serves Il Chiostro, a great local beer, and a seaside restaurant called Il Carlino that makes a perfectly simple burrata dish…

2 min.
welcome to fairyland

Walk down one woodland path and you’ll see birch and aspen trees hung with acrylic paintings. Head down another and you’ll discover that what you thought was a huge tree is actually a sculpture “growing” from a block of concrete. So it goes at ethereal, sylvan Gunillaberg, the country estate of Dutch floral artist Tage Andersen in Sweden’s rural Småland region. Gunillaberg was not Andersen’s first botanically trippy venture— garden nuts have been queuing up to see his Narnia-like floral creations since he opened his Copenhagen store in 1987—but it is by far his most ambitious. Andersen and his husband, Monz, found the seventeenth-century house set on 42 acres in 2008 and transformed it into a summer retreat/quasi-public garden that’s open May through September. “The former owner was almost 100 when…

2 min.
no-pressure provence

Provence hardly needs a sales pitch—from medieval Avignon to the port of Marseille, the countryside is a maze of hilltop villages, open-air markets, and lavender fields. Which is why it’s tempting to try to tick off every charming town, vineyard, and experience (cooking class, bike tour, both?) when you’re there. But to do so is to miss out on part of the region’s true appeal—its languid pace. Creating an escape where guests can slip into this lazy rhythm is exactly what inspired retail mogul Frédéric Biousse, founder and former CEO of Sandro Maje Claudie Pierlot (SMCP), and art dealer Guillaume Foucher to buy the Domaine de Fontenille, a wine-making estate in the southern Luberon, and turn it into a boutique hotel set away from Provence’s most touristy corners. In 2013, the couple…