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Conde Nast Traveler

Conde Nast Traveler June/July 2017

Condé Nast Traveler magazine is filled with the travel secrets of celebrated writers and sophisticated travelers. Each monthly issue features breathtaking destinations, including the finest art, architecture, fashion, culture, cuisine, lodgings, and shopping. With Condé Nast Traveler as your guide, you'll discover the best islands, cities, spas, castles, and cruises.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Conde Nast US
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8 Issues

In this issue

2 min.
contributors

Adam Haslett The author of Imagine Me Gone wrote Lake Love, p. 90 Window or aisle? Aisle. I do as much yoga in the airplane’s galley as I can before being evicted by the crew. Best souvenir? A Beni Ourain wool carpet from the souks of Marrakech. I rolled it up and hauled it through four airports before getting it into my living room. It’s so fluffy, it’s like a pet. Legendary layover? Twenty-four hours in Reykjavík. I wandered the city at dawn with hardly a soul in sight, ate in three different restaurants, and still got eight hours of sleep. Andrea Whittle CNT’s Assistant Editor made two trips out west for our San Francisco Blackbook, p. 50 Best hotel bathroom? The ones at the new Williamsburg Hotel in Brooklyn. They’re gorgeous, with raw- copper fixtures and turquoise tiles, and the…

2 min.
more than half the fun

My husband and I recently bought a 1962 Jeep Willys on eBay that we only ever drive outside of the city on weekends. We don’t mind that the second gear sticks. Or that it only has three gears—“three on the tree,” so called for the manual transmission’s archaic placement on the base of the steering wheel. Or that it goes a maximum of about 40 miles per hour, recently prompting an impatient Porsche driver with a slicked-back man bob to give us the finger while passing on the road from Sag Harbor to East Hampton. In fact, at the first hint of spring this year, despite unseasonably cold weather, we wrapped ourselves in scarves and blankets, buckled into the roofless, doorless glorified golf cart, and drove to pick up fresh chickens…

2 min.
worldly advice

Imagine harvesting oysters on a Kenyan island or overnighting in a 300-year-old, family-owned Kyoto ryokan. Our contributing editor Sofía “Chufy” Sanchez de Betak has a lifetime’s worth of on-the-road experiences just like these (she is the daughter of CNT travel specialist Maita Barrenechea, after all), which she shares in her new book, Travels with Chufy (Assouline, $50). Here, the three places she swears should be on the radar of anyone planning their next trip this month. The Greek Isle You Might Have Written Off “I’d always assumed that Rhodes, which is known for its walkable medieval towns and sandy beaches, would be overrun with tourists. But boy, was I off. My husband and I strayed just two blocks from the main street’s souvenir kiosks to discover a cluster of hushed side streets…

1 min.
oahu, hawaii

If it weren’t for the iPads and Kindles, you could almost imagine it was 1962 lounging poolside at the iconic pink stucco Royal Hawaiian (above), a beacon on Waikiki’s shores since 1927, or sipping a mai tai at the Kahala Hotel after visiting the Moorish masterpiece Shangri La, Doris Duke’s home turned museum. In the last couple of years, however, the island feels like it’s emerging from its halcyon haze. Not only are there outstanding restaurants in red-hot Chinatown—the food obsessed are flocking to Senia, which is helmed by two former Per Se chefs—there’s a new crop of stylish hotels, ranging from ultraluxe (like the Four Seasons, on the rugged west coast) to more sceney spots like Waikiki’s Surfjack and The Laylow. Regardless of where you stay, you’ll want your…

1 min.
“flying alone for work is like a vacation. flying with my son is definitely work.”

DIRECTOR OF GAGOSIAN SAN FRANCISCO ANNA GAVAZZI ASSEILY Whether the San Francisco–based gallery director is headed to an art fair in London, where she lived for seven years, or her hometown of Milan to see family, her goal is to make international travel as painless as possible. Here, she tells us her secrets to style on overnight flights and to making a tight connection with a two-year-old in tow. Travel Uniform: MaxMara silk pajamas, a Frances Leon jacket, and a pair of woven loafers from CB Made in Italy. They come in every pattern and material imaginable. I probably have eight pairs! Favorite Bay Area Boutique: Pia in Jackson Square carries the best designers, like Delpozo and Roksanda. In Transit with a Toddler: I do Airbnb or OneFineStay so I have a full kitchen…

2 min.
baja soul

Four years ago, when Austin-based hotelier Liz Lambert first laid eyes on Todos Santos in Baja California, 47 miles north of Cabo, she knew immediately this was where she’d open the Hotel San Cristóbal, her first property outside of the U.S. “It was a place with a deep soul and a story that I wanted to tell,” she says of the historic mission town. Its relaxed vibe reminded her of Marfa, Texas (her second home), and that setting—framed by the deep blue Pacific and a golden desert coastline—is about as idyllic as it gets. Working with Lake Flato, the sustainable architecture firm behind her Austin properties, Lambert and her team at Bunkhouse Hospitality did a deep dive into the regional culture and design, making bimonthly research trips for four years. The…