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Conde Nast Traveler

Conde Nast Traveler October 2017

Condé Nast Traveler magazine is filled with the travel secrets of celebrated writers and sophisticated travelers. Each monthly issue features breathtaking destinations, including the finest art, architecture, fashion, culture, cuisine, lodgings, and shopping. With Condé Nast Traveler as your guide, you'll discover the best islands, cities, spas, castles, and cruises.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Conde Nast US
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8 Issues

In this issue

1 min.
ask the editors

David Prior, Contributing International Editor “Umpteen-hour flights to Sydney often arrive in the very early morning, and all I ever want is a strong flat white and a healthy Australian breakfast— yes, likely avo toast—at Ruby’s Diner.” Lale Arikoglu, Associate Digital Editor “By the time I’ve landed at Heathrow, my mum has already secured a lunchtime table at Notting Hill’s The Cow, where the piping hot bowl of crab tagliolini is the stuff of comfort?food dreams.” Meredith Carey, Assistant Digital Editor “Every time I go back to Dallas, I head straight to Torchy’s Tacos and get the same order: one green chili pork, one ‘trailer park’—fried chicken, green chilies, pico— and one mind-blowing queso with diablo sauce.” Christa Guerra, Associate Art Director “It’s usually way past dinnertime when I arrive at my parents’ in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia,…

1 min.
contributors

Tom Parker Bowles The London-based writer feasted on Szechuan cuisine in Chengdu, p. 88. What restaurant dishes are worth traveling for? The zuppa di cozze at Da Adolfo in Positano, the jungle curry at Nahm in Bangkok, and the seafood tostadas at La Guerrerense in Ensenada, Mexico, are sublime. Oh, and the ceviche at Chez Wong in Lima! Best airport lounge on earth? When in Sydney, I actually go to the airport early, as the Qantas First Lounge is exceptional—it even has a Neil Perry menu. Nothing else comes close. Matt Hranek Our men’s fashion editor and author of A Man and His Watch, forthcoming from Artisan Books, photographed Havana’s restaurant revolution, p. 100. Most memorable airport encounter? I was once stopped by airport police in Dubai—but only because they loved my Red Wing boots.…

2 min.
turning the tables

In the winter of 2003, when my first son was just two months old, our tiny family of three moved from our beloved Chelsea one-and-a-half bedroom walk-up to an “estate condition” brownstone in Park Slope, Brooklyn. Along with our second child, we have shared it ever since with my brother and sister-in-law and my now eight-year-old nephew. As a native Californian who had never planned to stay in New York beyond a few years, I remember crying when our offer was accepted and saying, “I didn’t move to New York City to live in Brooklyn.” Then, in the land of Crocs and ’90s sun-dried-tomato eateries, we discovered Franny’s, a farm-to-table pizzeria run by husband-and-wife team Francine Stephens and Andrew Feinberg—long before the term “farm-to-table” had been co-opted by every tatted hipster…

2 min.
editors’ picks

HIGH-ALTITUDE TRAINING Belmond’s new luxury sleeper train is hands down the most stylish way to see the Peruvian Andes. They’ve taken the old-school, romantic notion of rail travel (dining cars with white tablecloths, plush private cabins, a caboose with a wrought iron railing where you can gaze out wistfully) and thrown in a top-notch spa, a bar car that churns out pisco sours long after dinner, and a menu put together by star chef Diego Muñoz, formerly of Astrid & Gastón, one of Lima’s best restaurants. I boarded the Andean Explorer outside the historic volcanic city of Arequipa for a two-night trip through the La Raya mountain range to Cusco, with a five-hour stop to explore Lake Titicaca’s floating islands. On the first night, after a dinner of alpaca tortellini and…

1 min.
ludo lefebvre chef and restaurateur

“I Love Being on an Airplane. It’s Like Going to the Spa for Six Hours.” Burgundy-born, Los Angeles–based Ludo Lefebvre keeps Petit Trois and Trois Mec on the short list of strip-mall L.A. restaurants by sweating every detail, from his sauces to the soundtrack. When he’s on the road, he’s constantly taking mental notes—especially when he’s dining solo—and trying to find some inner peace along the way. Travel uniform: Usually, I go straight from the airport to the kitchen or a TV appearance. This denim Saint Laurent shirt and jeans work for both. Two to try in L.A.: Asanebo, for yellowtail sashimi with black lava salt, and Parks BBQ, for wagyu ggot sal and the kimchi pancake. The souvenir haul: I try to find snow globes for my twin six-year-olds and decorations for the…

2 min.
wizard of oz a fanciful new hotel comes to australia’s wine country

Amid the vineyards and rustic B&Bs of the Mornington Peninsula, an hour southeast of antipodean foodie mecca Melbourne, sits a 23-foot-tall metal sculpture of a jackalope. As black as Darth Vader, the mythical creature (a rabbit with antelope horns) is the whimsical mascot of Australia’s newest luxury boutique hotel—which, like its namesake, is a hybrid: part hotel, part winery, with a restaurant and art space. The Jackalope was dreamed up by Louis Li, 30, a graduate of cinema studies with a penchant for David Lynch who also happens to belong to a family of hotel developers. “Li’s vision was to create a unique escape fueled by his love of film and art,” says Sue Carr, of Melbourne’s Carr Design Group, which did the surrealistic interiors. “Our challenge was to provide excitement…