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Country Collectibles Cottage StyleCountry Collectibles Cottage Style

Country Collectibles Cottage Style

Country Collectibles Cottage Style

In the mood for a quick vacation? Well check your cares at the door, throw up your feet and let your eyes and imagination wander through our latest issue of Cottage Style. In it, you’ll enjoy: *Sweeping coastal views and interiors designed to complement the surrounding surf, sand and sun. *Lessons from the pros on how to pick the right rug, create a perfect palette and even make your own artwork. *The cutest, coziest little bungalows and jewel boxes—many under 900 square feet—that go big on charm. *Learning how to upcycle salvage and vintage elements to create one-of-a-kind looks...without spending a mint.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Athlon Media Group
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IN THIS ISSUE

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making new memories

(PHOTO BY GRIDLEY+GRAVES)Some of my sweetest childhood recollections spring from my grandparents’ home—a 1940s stone cottage, built by my grandfather. Out front, a crimson maple tree—perfect for climbing— spread its sturdy limbs wide. Inside, the stone fireplace set the tone for cozy, lightsoaked rooms that nurtured hours of good fun and conversation.It’s all that promise of happy memorymaking that draws me to the homes in this issue— like Jenny Piazza’s lakeside cottage on page 132 that’s been handed down through her family for 125 years. Or Brenda McDevitt’s own stone cottage on page 106, where refurbished castoffs shape vibrant, inviting spaces.As you turn the pages, you’ll find countless ideas and inspiration for creating your own warmth-filled cottage and treasured memories sure to come. ■…

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breezy bungalows

Peaches and cream. Mornings and dew. Heart and soul. What comes to mind when you envision perfect pairs like these? They all fit together like a hand in a glove—take sunlight and cottage style, for example. They just naturally go together. That’s why, when it comes to planning your cottage spaces, you’ll be excited to shoo away shadows and bid goodbye to any dreary decor. The sweet bungalows in this chapter show you how to invite an airy ambience and weightless color into every room. Enveloped by this radiant glow, you’ll quickly feel stresses vanish. So get ready to smile and let your cares slip away as you step through these front doors and into the light. ■…

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fresh start

Patti Eisenberg loves a party—hosting a crowd of friends, enjoying great food, and hearty laughter all make for a very good day in her book. So when she made the decision to move from her 5,000-square-foot Southern California home overlooking the Rose Bowl to something much smaller, she knew she wanted to find a place that allowed her to live no less vibrantly.details make the differenceThere was something about a slightly curious 1,800-square-foot cottage in Pasadena’s Chapman Woods that caught her eye. Still dressed in many of its original late-1930s details (such as an adorable “telephone table” niche off a long hallway), the home offered a U-shape floor plan wrapped enticingly around a courtyard. An unusually large living room (for such a modestly sized home) occupied one leg of the…

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setting the scene

(SHUTTERSTOCK/PIOTR_PABIJAN)1. Interior designer Debra Bergstrom envisioned homeowner Patti Eisenberg standing in the entryway greeting guests with a backdrop that is every bit as creative and lively as she is. The Imperial Trellis wall covering by Schumacher visually energizes the foyer walls and sets the stage for what’s beyond.2. “Patti has collections from all over the world that are just wonderful, so in a display like this, you want to edit belongings so something special stands out, rather than becoming lost in a crowd,” Debra says. “Putting just a few treasured bookplates and antique prints on the shelf gives them artistic emphasis.”3. One of the home’s architectural quirks is a very long, narrow hallway that runs from the entryway to the back of the house. Leaving this original telephone table and…

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memory maker

The moment Megan Collins stepped through the door of the Minneapolis farmhouse with her husband, Casey, there was something fondly familiar about the place. “It reminded me of the house I grew up in,” Megan recalls. The home’s imperfections (like slightly uneven floors) as well as its architecture, with lots of angles, captured her heart and imagination.The couple moved in with their three young daughters, adding a son a few years later. Megan wanted her home to be “very kid-friendly,” she says. It was only natural that she decided to draw on happy childhood memories for inspiration. “My mother had a whimsical sense of style,” she says. “I wanted that look along with a comfortable mix of modern and vintage pieces.”hardworking whiteInitially, Megan refreshed the rooms with white paint, including…

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chalk it up!

(SHUTTERSTOCK/PIOTR_PABIJAN)COMMUNICATION CENTRALOrdinary closet doors become a fun family-oriented feature when painted with chalkboard paint. Here’s how you can make your own:MaterialsSandpaperRags or tack clothDrywall compound or wood fillerPutty knifePrimerChalkboard paint Painter’s tapeAngledpaintbrushShort-nap rollerDropclothHow To1. Fill dings or cracks in the door surface. Let dry. Lightly sand the closet doors to remove gloss and smooth surface. Wipe away sanding dust with a damp rag or tackcloth.2. Using the angled brush to reach into recesses and for edging, and the roller for large, flat areas, coat the closet doors with primer. Let dry.3. Follow the manufacturer’s directions for applying the chalkboard paint. Use the angled brush and roller to apply two coats to the surface. Let dry, typically for three days, so the paint cures.4. Using the side of a piece of…

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