EXPLOREMY LIBRARY
Travel & Outdoor
Cowboys & Indians

Cowboys & Indians October 2019

Get Cowboys & Indians digital magazine subscription today to experience the best of the Western lifestyle, including the latest in fashion, travel, food and wine, architecture and home décor, art, music, and film, all presented with spectacular images from award-winning photographers.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
USFRSC, Inc.
Frequency:
Monthly
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8 Issues

in this issue

1 min.
cowboysindians.com

Hee Haw At 50 We continue this issue’s country music celebration at cowboysindians.com, where you’ll find a 50thanniversary retrospective on Hee Haw—a “sa-loot” to the music, the jokes, and the honeys of Kornfield Kounty. The C&I Country Music Playlist We wouldn’t talk so much about music this issue without offering you some for your listening pleasure. Search “playlist” at cowboysindians.com to find the soundtrack to this edition, an Apple Music collection of tunes from Strait, Parton, Cash, Haggard, Nelson, Brooks & Dunn, and all the up-and-coming artists who are beginning to carry the torch. Bring On The Recipes We realize you can’t possibly hit all the food cities in our Taste of the West feature right away, but you can start exploring their famous fare in your own kitchen. Search “Taste of the West” at…

2 min.
contributors

Robby Klein, photographer, “Play Something Country,” page 69 A singer with Western roots who inspires me would be Reba. An icon, a legend, and one of the kindest people I’ve had the honor of working with. Her most recent record was music that circled back to her roots, radio be damned! Reba created and put out what was true to her, not what the industry says modern country music needs to be, and that to me is inspiring as an artist. Chuck Thompson, writer, “Three Chords and the Truth,” page 84 The Old 97’s have a song called “Longer Than You’ve Been Alive.” It’s not only a great tune about being in a band, it speaks to the longevity of their career. Lead singer Rhett Miller has written tons of memorable songs on…

2 min.
now playing the good stuff

THE OCTOBER EDITION OF COWBOYS & Indians began to take shape many months ago. In one corner of our Dallas headquarters, food and drink editor José R. Ralat was assembling a group of writers and editors with a mission to shine lights on some of the West’s great food destinations. In another corner, other staffers were lining up photographers, models, outfits, and a location for our fall fashion shoot—a project that would challenge us to re-create the cozy confines of a ski lodge in the heat of the Texas summer. And outside the C&I HQ, longtime contributor Chuck Thompson was wrapping up an interview with Ken Burns, the award-winning documentary director, about Burns’ new retrospective series, Country Music. Looking ahead at an issue filled with Western fashion, food, and music, I…

2 min.
letters

Try This One Out Loved your July 2019 issue that included all things Texas! One good movie that escaped mention in your Texas contemporary film list was the 1998 film Dancer, Texas Pop. 81. It’s a good one I highly recommend. —Jarrod Goldberg, Houston Christmas Every Issue After reading C&I for months while visiting my parents (and asking to take them home), I realized I needed my own subscription. When my husband asked me what I wanted for Christmas in December 2018, I blurted out, “a subscription to Cowboys & Indians, please!” Now I have my very own Christmas all over again when your magazine hits my mailbox.… I would like to thank Hunter Hauk for his “Travel Tips for the Soul” Editor’s Note in the July issue. It reminded me to stop worrying…

2 min.
the best of the west

FROM COOL MORNING HUES TO RUGGED EVENING WARMTH Here, our must-have fall looks for Westerners on the go. OLD-SCHOOL CLASSICS SPOTLIGHT CRISP TAILORING AND CUSTOM DETAILS. NEW-SCHOOL FAVORITES FAVOR FALL COLORS AND AUTUMNAL TONES.…

3 min.
western storefront

Canty Boots In business, inspiration can come from anywhere. For Canty Boots founder Nikki Edmundson, it came from a pair of boots that were too tight in the calves. “I began experimenting,” Edmundson recalls. “I cut them, folded them, and decorated them. Then I wore them into town, and everyone was complimenting them. That’s how it started.” That was back in 2010, when she was still working toward a teaching degree. “I was offered several jobs but felt I would regret not going a more artistic route in my career,” she says. From the start, her focus was on vintage boots—turning a broken-in old pair into something new, fun, and unique. “In the beginning, I was driving hundreds of miles all over rural Montana every weekend, searching antique stores, boot stores, and garage sales,” Edmundson…