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Cowboys & Indians Cowboys & Indians

Cowboys & Indians January 2017

Get Cowboys & Indians digital magazine subscription today to experience the best of the Western lifestyle, including the latest in fashion, travel, food and wine, architecture and home décor, art, music, and film, all presented with spectacular images from award-winning photographers.

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
USFRSC, Inc.
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8 Issues

IN THIS ISSUE

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c & i

(PHOTOGRAPHY: COURTESY LARS STRANDBERG)WWW.COWBOYSINDIANS.COMFloating In SausalitoSwedish writer Lars Åberg and photographer Lars Strandberg presented their vision of the American West in the acclaimed 2011 picture book West. The duo return to make a splash with Floating in Sausalito (Kerber, 2016), a look at counterculture and affluence converging in a quirky houseboat community near San Francisco, and we have a few gorgeous photos to share.High Rolling In Las VegasIf you hit the jackpot in Las Vegas, there are plenty of ways to indulge yourself in the Entertainment Capital of the World, from a $777 Kobe beef-and-Maine lobster burger to $40,000-a-night suites.Watching WesternsVisit C&I’s blog every Monday to find out which classic and contemporary western films are coming to TV and streaming services.Weekly E-NewsletterSign up at www.cowboysindians.com/newsletter to receive the best of…

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contributors

“The argument over what is and what is not ‘real country music’ has been a prominent, and tiring, talking point for critics and fans for generations now,” says Kelly Dearmore, who writes about what’s going to be new and noteworthy in the genre this year (page 105). “Even when Willie Nelson was landing hit after hit in the 1970s, slick pop-style crooners were also selling millions of records and dominating the airwaves.”Excellent country music is still being made and is more readily available than ever, Dearmore explains. It may not be found on commercial country radio, but it’s a click or two away. “Thirty to 40 years ago, musical artists such as Jonny Fritz and Paul Cauthen would’ve likely had a hard time finding an audience in the more strictly…

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moving forward

(PHOTOGRAPHY: COURTESY LONE MOUNTAIN RANCH)WELCOME TO 2017, DEAR READER. WHILE it’s customary in many New Year’s celebrations to wait until the first minute of January to make a big toast, that’s not how we do things at Cowboys & Indians. We’ll raise a glass of something strong — craft whiskey, please — as early as we can. So let’s kick this off properly before we dig into the new issue together:Here’s to a 2017 more defined by peace and prosperity than by loss and tumult. Here’s to a year that bestows on us the opportunities we seek, whether they involve reconnections to the past or journeys into uncharted territory. And, considering how much we all love the beauty and spirit of the West, here’s to us.Now let’s talk resolutions. Forget…

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letters

Super SullyAs a former general aviation pilot, I frequently flew the Hudson River Corridor, which allowed little guys like me to fly underneath the big commercial stuff to get a spectacular view of Manhattan and the Statue of Liberty. To do so, you fly south along the New Jersey side of the Hudson River at about 700 feet as far as the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, where you swing a 180-degree turn north and head back up along the Manhattan waterfront.I remembered these flights while reading “Sully” in your October 2016 issue about the so-called “Miracle on the Hudson.” The Hudson River Corridor is essentially the unintentional route Capt. Chesley B. Sullenberger took to land his crippled aircraft in January 2009. The first thing you notice while flying the corridor is that,…

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open range

NOTABLE BAGGAGEThe embodiment of artisan leather goods, American West crafts its timeless totes entirely by hand from start to finish, tooling each one strike by strike. For its 30th anniversary in 2016, the label debuted a Commemorative Anniversary Collection of limited edition doctor’s bags hand-carved to every corner. They might remind you of something you’d find at a vintage market or the back of your grandfather’s closet. Which makes sense when founder Louise de Kok explains how the designs pay tribute to the company’s origins. “It all started with a hand-tooled leather travel doctor’s bag my late husband, Michiel, bought me on a trip to South America 30 years ago.” www.americanwest.ccLIZ JAMES JEWELRYTexas jewelry designer Jamie Pope says she hopes to “speak to the beauty and elegance of the versatile…

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western storefront

Turquoise & LavenderWhen the name on the door is Turquoise & Lavender, you might expect to find Navajo jewelry displayed alongside candles and lotions. You’d be right: This boutique features plenty of one-of-a-kind turquoise, as well as fragrant oils distilled from the finest harvested lavender. But that’s just the beginning of what you’ll find inside the upscale Dallas showroom. Every piece is personally selected by store owner Eddie Bickers, who previously spent nearly two decades in the design industry. “My passion has always been design,” he says, “and I have always wanted to have a store that had all of my favorite things.”He’s done just that at Turquoise & Lavender, which opened its doors in March 2016. “The idea was if someone moved to Dallas and didn’t even have a…

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