Cricket Magazine Fiction and Non-Fiction Stories for Children and Young Teens July/August 2021

Perhaps no other single publication has inspired generations of readers as CRICKET has. Acclaimed for its high-quality fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and brilliant illustrations, CRICKET delivers intelligent, imaginative content that encourages readers to develop their own, unique creativity. Frequent contests encourage young writers to try their hand at various genres. Grades 4-8

Country:
United States
Language:
English
Publisher:
Cricket Media, Inc.
Frequency:
Monthly
$3.99
$24.95
9 Issues

in this issue

9 min
the letterbox

Dear Everybuggy, I love your mag! I get it from my cousins, who grew up with Spider. I am in my first year of track, but this is my fourth year of cross-country. I used to play the violin, but I’m such an active person I couldn’t handle sitting for an hour or two! My favorite book series is Wings of Fire. I have an old dog who just turned eighteen. My older brother (he’s twelve) got a malamute. He has a red paw, so his name is—you guessed it—Red! I’m hoping for a beagle. My little sister helped come up with names. My favorite is Quinn. Hailey, age 11 Longmont, Colorado Hello! I joined Chatterbox after I got my first Cricket magazine. Chatterbox is awesome! I have a pet fish and a pet cat. I…

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7 min
i’ve got to hold a what?

TODAY MY NIGHTMARE came true. It was Bo. I first met Bo when I volunteered to be a junior docent at the zoo. It was a summer program our school participated in, where biology students earned extra credit by teaching little kids about some of the animals. I needed to bring up my biology grade, so I asked my friend Sue Wang to be my partner. “Melanie, I’ll do this with you,” she said, “but I’ll do the talking. No way will I handle the animals!” That was OK with me. I like animals. During the training course, our instructor, Mr. Lindsey, talked to each pair of docents about the animals we would take to summer recreation programs and classes at year-round schools. When he came to Sue and me, he said, “OK, girls, your…

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5 min
bees, please!

IF YOU’RE LOOKING to adopt 60,000 low-maintenance pets, then honeybees are the perfect friends for you. Even your mom might approve! Other pets rely on humans for everything—warmth, protection, exercise and play, food and water, and the most-dreaded “duty,” poop cleanup. Since honeybees take care of themselves in virtually every way, beekeeping is mostly a stewardship. This means that the beekeeper will just watch over and protect the bees. After the first spring inspection, a good beekeeper will check on them once every three to four weeks through the summer and fall, until it’s time to extract, or take out, the honey. When most people think of beehives, they picture a skep beehive, which is like a round basket woven from grass. But most beekeepers no longer use this type of…

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1 min
want to start beekeeping?

With a parent’s help, check your city ordinances and homeowner association guidelines to make sure that residential beekeeping is allowed where you live. You may need to register with your state’s Department of Agriculture. The upfront cost can be hundreds of dollars for one set of hives and removable frames ($300), a bee package with queen ($100), a suit ($40–$80), gloves ($20), a hive tool ($10), and smoker ($20). Other equipment may be recommended by other beekeepers, but most is unnecessary. Unlike with other pets, costs throughout the season will be nominal, if any. It’s a good idea to take a beekeeping class or find a local mentor. Although maintenance is easy, you may benefit from advice about where to place your hive, what type of bees to order (Italians are gentle…

1 min
heinz

He appeared on the doorstep one dayBoth big and small in sizeA dog of mixed-bag breedsWe decided to call him Heinz For Dad, he’d work all dayRunning with the sheepHe asked for little in returnA pat, kind words, a sleep To Mum, he was a protectorOf danger, he had no fearAny threat around, he’d bark it downNo stranger would dare come nearThe baby, she had him intriguedCrawling around the houseNose to the ground, he followed her roundLike a cat on the trail of a mouse After school, he’d wait at the gateWe’d play till the sun’s last lightExhausted but happy, inside for teaHe’d sleep by my bed at night To each, he was something differentLoyal, right up to the endThat bitzer, mongrel, mixed up muttWorker, protector . . . best friend.…

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8 min
the expert

“SO, YOU WANT to keep bugs safe from Mom’s fly swatter, huh, short stuff?” asks Krishna. Her eyes follow a housefly lazily zigzagging around the apartment living room. “Mm-hmm!” replies Krishna’s little sister, Anjuli. She stands at attention and nods her head quickly, her shiny black ponytail bobbing behind her. “I’m going to be a famous expert on bugs and bug catching soon,” says Krishna, watching the raisin-sized fly land on the coffee table. She creeps toward it. “What’s an expert?” asks Anjuli. “Someone that knows all about something. That’s me, so listen and learn. “Lesson one: If a bug wanders into the apartment, put a cup over it and then slide something underneath to seal it in,” she says, holding up a paper cup and museum postcard. “Then carry it outside to freedom. “Lesson two:…

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