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Bass Player

Bass Player

January 2021

Bass Player is the world's most comprehensive, trusted and insightful bass publication for passionate bassists and active musicians of all ages. Each issue delivers the latest tips and techniques that are guaranteed to make you a better player.

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Land:
United Kingdom
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Future Publishing Ltd
Erscheinungsweise:
Monthly
AUSGABE KAUFEN
6,10 €(Inkl. MwSt.)
ABONNIEREN
15,69 €(Inkl. MwSt.)
13 Ausgaben

in dieser ausgabe

1 Min.
welcome

When you sit down for an interview with a musician like Glenn Hughes, you need to expect the unexpected. I’ve known him for years, but I still had no idea what his answer would be when I asked him if he regretted any of his career decisions. It turns out that joining Deep Purple in 1973 wasn’t quite the clear-cut choice that you’d think it might be, great as that band was and is today. Dive into our full and frank chat with the Voice Of Rock for his thoughts on sobriety, supergroups, and the continued, all-encompassing passion for the low end, which helps to keep him grounded and sane to this day, half a century into his career. We cover a lot of ground in this end-of-year issue, hanging out…

2 Min.
best bassists revealed!

This year’s Best Bassist Of 2020 poll was launched at Music Radar back in November, and the results are a clear indicator of the all-round coolness of the bass community, with musicians from the metal, disco, and solo worlds storming into the top three. Our outright winner this year is John Campbell of Lamb Of God, whose speed-picking metal mayhem has had jaws dropping all through this year. This recognition is truly deserved, we reckon—so congratulations from all of us at Bass Player to John. As he tells us: “While recognition is not sought after by most in my position, it is a great honor to be recognized by the brilliant readers of the infallible Music Radar and Bass Player by being voted Bassist Of The Year. My day today has been…

1 Min.
stanley clarke signature preamp inbound

“The mainstay to my acoustic sound... it is essential for every acoustic bass player to own one” Sweden-based amp and effects makers EBS has collaborated with the jazz-fusion bassist Stanley Clarke once again to create a new Signature Acoustic Preamp pedal, designed for upright bass players. Perhaps most notable about the new addition is its diverse array of EQ controls. Its two channels each feature their own dials for bass, mids and treble, as well as a high-pass/notch filter switch. Designed to handle either passive, active, or piezo pickups, the pedal features two 1/4” high-impedance (10 megaohm) inputs. The A channel also provides support for Electret pickups with a dedicated switch, while the B channel provides phantom power for use with condenser mics via its XLR mic input. Other features include an…

1 Min.
boxing clever

The acclaimed amp-makers Phil Jones Bass have launched a new 500-watt enclosure, the Cab 67, featuring six proprietary PJB 7” drivers, along with a 3” tweeter. As PJB tell us, “The potential shock wave created by two Cab 67s and a BP-800 amp stacked together will exhilarate any playing situation yet stands only 54 inches tall.” Built-in casters and wheel wells plus a recessed handle make the Cab 67 stackable; its frequency response runs from 30 Hz to 25 Khz; impedance is eight ohms; and it weighs 50 lbs. www.pjbworld.com…

1 Min.
love lines

No. 1: The Cure, ‘The Lovecats’ (1983) A perfect example of the correct application of the upright bass in modern pop music, the bass-line which propels ‘The Lovecats’ is insanely catchy, based on a nifty ascending figure, and oozing the sound of wood. After the first 100 listens—remember, this song has been a radio and indie-club staple for 37 years—Robert Smith’s eerily wailed, appropriately feline vocals and the honky-tonk piano may start to set your back teeth on edge a little, but there’s no arguing with the slick quality of Phil Thornalley’s bass part.…

1 Min.
rest in peace

Dave Markee, the bassist with a large number of important musicians from the Seventies and Eighties, died in October at the age of 77. Dave, who in his later years was the senior pastor and worship leader at Folly’s End Christian Fellowship in London, had played alongside the Rolling Stones, Frank Zappa, Joan Armatrading, the Who, and Bing Crosby among others. He was most visible alongside Eric Clapton from 1979 to 1982, playing on the Just One Night (1980) and Another Ticket (1981) albums. Midnight Oil’s bassist Bones Hillman also passed away in November, aged 62. The New Zealand-born musician had been a member of the Australian rock band for the last 33 years. As the group said in a statement: “He was the bassist with the beautiful voice, the band…