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Beadwork

Beadwork April - May 2017

Get Beadwork digital magazine subscription to find all-new irresistible necklace designs, must-have bracelet patterns, and can't-miss tips. Explore your favorite techniques such as peyote, right-angle weave, herringbone, and more. PLUS be confident every step of the way with fully illustrated step-by-step instructions.

Land:
United States
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Peak Media Properties, LLC
Erscheinungsweise:
Bimonthly
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2 Min.
passing through

The Season of Beginning The beauty of spring is that it brings with it a sense of renewal. Think of spring cleaning and how that age-old practice makes your home seem fresh and new. Here at Beadwork, we’re excited to kick off spring with a few added bonuses. For starters, we’ve increased the page count to give you more content and value. And while we’re still providing the same number of intermediate and advanced projects, we’ve added more content suitable to those who may just be starting out, or that may appeal to experienced beaders looking for a quick project. We’re also bringing back the popular Fast & Fabulous section of easy, stylish projects (page 67). In these pages, you’ll find bracelet, necklace, and earring inspiration featuring spring themes and palettes. In…

2 Min.
tammy lawson: guiding light

When I was six years old, my parents ran a seafood restaurant where my older sisters worked as waitresses. Every night after work they would count their tip money, and I would be sad that I didn’t make any money to count. So, my mother taught me how to make necklaces using metallic thread, beads, and a simple chain stitch. My father, Carl “Pee Wee” Wilson, made a display for my necklaces in the restaurant, and I sold them to customers for $1 each. That way , at the end of each night, I would have money to count, too. Beadwork Magazine: Inspiring Beaders for 20 Years! To celebrate the twentieth anniversary of Beadwork magazine, we’re publishing inspirational stories from you, our readers! We would love to hear how beading has changed your…

3 Min.
cool stuff

1. Inspired by America’s national parks, such as Redwood, Denali, and Shenandoah, the high-relief charms of the Nature Collection by Nunn Design feature plant and animal imagery, organic shapes, and an antiqued finish. They are available in copper, gold, and silver at www.nunndesign.com (wholesale only) or check your favorite bead retailer. 2. The new 3×5mm fire-polished donuts from The BeadSmith feature a lovely faceted texture and twenty rich colors and finishes, including red dark travertine and green turquoise dark travertine, shown here. Visit www.beadsmith.com (wholesale only) or check your favorite bead retailer. 3. Inspired by the colors of vintage California fruit-crate advertisements, the beads of the Pacifica collection by Starman are available in a variety of shapes. With soft, glowing colors, the new 14mm cushion rounds are beautiful in both beadwoven and…

2 Min.
thread tension

LESSONS IN BEADWEAVING Take a look at these two right-angle-weave samples. They’re made using the same beads, the same thread, and the same stitch configuration. So, why do they look so different? The answer is simple: thread tension. Here, Beadwork’s founding editor Jean Cox shares a few basic techniques to help you get your thread tension right. A WORD ABOUT WAX No matter what type of thread you use, wax it before you use it. I like to use good oldfashioned beeswax, even on my FireLine. The stickier the wax, the more it helps hold your thread in place. (Note that thread conditioner works, too, but its primary benefit is to make threads slick and demagnetized and to keep them from fraying. These are all wonderful and important attributes but not necessarily ideal…

6 Min.
saturn connections

SPOTLIGHT ON SEED BEADS Create components that are out of this world using herringbone and ladder stitches, then form seamless connections for an intriguing bracelet design. KITS ARE NOW AVAILABLE FOR THIS PROJECT AT www.interweave.com TECHNIQUES circular herringbone stitch ladder stitch PROJECT LEVEL ££¡ MATERIALS 0.5 g light smoky pewter galvanized size 15° seed beads (A) 5 g light smoky pewter galvanized size 11° seed beads (B) 2 g matte metallic blue slate AB size 11° cylinder beads (C) 9 polychrome orchid aqua 6mm pressed-glass rounds (D) 1 silver 16×10mm 2-strand tube clasp Smoke 4 lb FireLine braided beading thread TOOLS Scissors Size 11 or 12 beading needle FINISHED SIZE 7" 1) COMPONENTS. Use circular herringbone stitch and ladder stitch to make the components: Round 1: Use 2' of thread to string 16B, leaving a 4" tail. Pass through the beads twice to form a circle and exit through…

8 Min.
to seed beads & seed beading

New to seed beading and not sure where to start? Pick out some beads and get your creative juices flowing! We asked Tammy Honaman, web producer for the Interweave Bead and Jewelry groups, founding editor of Step-by-Step Beads, and bead artist extraordinaire, to introduce us to the basics. If you’re a seasoned pro, consider this a refresher or share it with a friend! seed beads Seed beads have been around for ages, originally used as a commodity in trading for other goods and services. These tiny pieces of glass are available in colors beyond the spectrum, thanks to finishes and layering techniques, and in sizes and shapes unheard of until recently, thanks to manufacturers pushing boundaries and developing new beadmaking techniques. Seed beads used in beadweaving and jewelry making are manufactured primarily in glass…