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Discover the DinosaursDiscover the Dinosaurs

Discover the Dinosaurs

Discover the Dinosaurs

Journey back to the age of dinosaurs and uncover the secrets of some of the prehistoric world’s most remarkable beasts. From the Tyrannosaurus rex and Diplodocus to the Triceratops and Stegosaurus, get up close and discover how these fascinating creatures lived, hunted, evolved and ultimately died out. In Discover the Dinosaurs we’ve gathered together some of the most fascinating articles from our team of experts at LiveScience.com to bring you everything you need to know about these incredible creatures that roamed our Earth millions of years ago. Why did Stegosaurus travel in herds? Could the dinosaurs have survived the asteroid that wiped them out? Is it possible to clone a dinosaur? Turn the page to find the answers to these questions and many more.

Land:
United Kingdom
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Future Publishing Ltd
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IN DIESER AUSGABE

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welcome

Journey back to the age of dinosaurs and uncover the secrets of some of the prehistoric world’s most remarkable beasts. From the Tyrannosaurus rex and Diplodocus to the Triceratops and Stegosaurus, get up close and discover how these fascinating creatures lived, hunted, evolved and ultimately died out. In Discover the Dinosaurs we’ve gathered together some of the most fascinating articles from our team of experts at LiveScience.com to bring you everything you need to know about these incredible creatures that roamed our Earth millions of years ago. Why did Stegosaurus travel in herds? Could the dinosaurs have survived the asteroid that wiped them out? Is it possible to clone a dinosaur? Turn the page to find the answers to these questions and many more. Enjoy!…

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discover the dinosaurs

Editorial Editor Dan Peel Designer Thomas Parrett Editorial Director Jon White Senior Art Editor Andy Downes Live Science Editorial Editor-in-Chief Jeanna Bryner Cover images Getty Images Photography All copyrights and trademarks are recognised and respected Advertising Media packs are available on request Commercial Director Clare Dove clare.dove@futurenet.com International Head of Print Licensing Rachel Shaw licensing@futurenet.com Circulation Head of Newstrade Tim Mathers Production Head of Production Mark Constance Production Project Manager Clare Scott Advertising Production Manager Joanne Crosby Digital Editions Controller Jason Hudson Production Managers Keely Miller, Nola Cokely, Vivienne Calvert, Fran Twentyman Management Chief Content Officer Aaron Asadi Commercial Finance Director Dan Jotcham Head of Art & Design Greg Whitaker Printed by William Gibbons, 26 Planetary Road, Willenhall, West Midlands, WV13 3XT Distributed by Marketforce, 5 Churchill Place, Canary Wharf, London, E14 5HU www.marketforce.co.uk Tel: 0203 787 9001 Future plc is a public company quoted on the London Stock Exchange (symbol: FUTR) www.futureplc.com Chief executive Zillah Byng-Thorne Non-executive chairman Richard Huntingford Chief financial officer Penny Ladkin-Brand…

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a brief history of dinosaurs

“They ruled the Earth for about 175 million years” Most people think of dinosaurs as big, ferocious, and extinct reptiles. That’s largely true, but there are some misconceptions. Dinosaurs came in all shapes and sizes. Dinosaurs were the largest land animals of all time, but a great number of dinosaurs were smaller than a turkey. Dinosaurs first appeared between 247 and 240 million years ago. They ruled the Earth for about 175 million years until an extinction event 65.5 million years ago wiped out all of them, except for the avian dinosaurs. Scientists don’t agree entirely on what happened, but the extinction likely was a double or triple whammy involving an asteroid impact, choking chemicals from erupting volcanoes, climate change, and possibly other factors. “Some of the more advanced dinosaurs had feathers or…

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7 surprising facts

Triceratops ate plants. T. rex had short arms. Brontosaurus was really apatosaurus. That may be enough dinosaur knowledge to get you through a round of Who Wants To Be a Millionaire? or Trivial Pursuit, but in recent years, paleontologists have turned up many more surprising dinosaur facts. We spoke with Mark A. Norell, the American Museum of Natural History’s chairman and curator of the museum’s division of paleontology, about the most surprising and little-known dinosaur facts. Here’s a sneak peek: baby dinosaurs were really cute. 1 PIGEON-SIZED DINOSAUR Although the museum’s new exhibit focuses on large dinosaurs, not all species were massive; some were actually pretty small. In fact, “many were cat or even pigeon-size,” Norell says. The smallest known pterodactyl, the Nemicolopterus crypticus (discovered in 2008), had a wingspan of only ten…

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mesozoic era: age of the dinosaurs

“During the Mesozoic giant reptiles, dinosaurs and other monstrous beasts roamed Earth” During the Mesozoic, or “Middle Life” era, life diversified rapidly, and giant reptiles, dinosaurs and other monstrous beasts roamed Earth. The period, which spans from about 252 million to about 66 million years ago, was also known as the Age of Reptiles, or the Age of Dinosaurs. English geologist John Phillips, the first person to create the global geologic timescale, first coined the term “Mesozoic” in the 1800s. Phillips found ways to correlate sediments found around the world to specific time periods, said Paul Olsen, a geoscientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University in New York. The Permian-Triassic boundary, at the start of the Mesozoic, is defined relative to a particular section of sediment in Meishan, China, where…

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the triassic period

“Most of the continents were concentrated in the giant C-shaped supercontinent known as Pangaea” The Triassic period was the first phase of the Mesozoic era, and occurred around 251 million and 199 million years ago. It followed the great mass extinction at the end of the Permian period, and was a time when life outside of the oceans began to diversify. At the beginning of the Triassic, most of the continents were concentrated in the giant C-shaped supercontinent known as Pangaea. The climate was generally very dry over much of Pangaea, with very hot summers and cold winters in the continental interior. A highly seasonal monsoon climate prevailed nearer to the coastal regions. Although the climate was more moderate farther from the equator, it was warmer than today, with no polar ice…

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