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Tech & Gaming
Edge

Edge

December 2020

The authority on videogame art, design and play, Edge is the must-have companion for game industry professionals, aspiring game-makers and super-committed hobbyists. Its mission is to celebrate the best in interactive entertainment today and identify the most important developments of tomorrow, providing the most trusted, in-depth editorial in the business via unparalleled access to the developers and technologies that make videogames the world’s most dynamic form of entertainment.

Land:
United Kingdom
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Future Publishing Ltd
Erscheinungsweise:
Monthly
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13 Ausgaben

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2 Min.
you’re as cold as ice, you’re willing to sacrifice

Success rarely comes for free. We’re not necessarily talking about money – although, as we send this issue of Edge off to print, Microsoft’s $7.5 billion acquisition of ZeniMax Media, and therefore Bethesda, is the talk of the industry. The Xbox maker now owns an entire publisher. With this huge outlay, presumably, comes a number of what Xbox spent all of last generation failing to secure: exclusives. Yes, it’s concerning that in this capitalist nightmare we all live in, the size of someone’s chequebook might be able to decide a console generation. But it’s not just the money. It’s the manners. Xbox has spent the last seven years humbled, building an ecosystem and a next-gen strategy designed to win people over by offering great value. Sony, riding high on last gen’s…

11 Min.
pay to win

We’ll be candid, because somebody has to be: our next-generation transition has not exactly been going swimmingly. In all fairness, we imagine much of the rest of the industry, from the CEOs to the developers to the marketing teams and beyond, might say the same thing. The arrival of COVID-19 has thrown even the best-laid plans into disarray, and everyone has scrambled to readjust. But never have we experienced such a dearth of information when it comes to the new consoles from Sony and Microsoft. Normally, we’d have had at least a few opportunities – E3, absent this year, being the big one – to speak with the top execs on both sides by now, to quiz them on the finer details of the machines and the strategies around them. We’d…

5 Min.
strike up the brand

Earlier this year, Tinybuild CEO Alex Nichiporchik made an assertion: “Indie publishing is dead.” Currently, the Hello Neighbor franchise co-founder pointed out, the videogame market is saturated with mid-size publishers. Those who do find success manage to trade in not just games, but their very identities – think the punk posturing of Devolver Digital, or the arthouse stylings of Annapurna Interactive. “Instead of focusing on one-off publishing deals,” Nichiporchik suggested, “it’s better to build strong and entertaining brands.” Enter MWM Interactive, a new arm of entertainment company Madison Wells Media, that’s looking to make a name for itself by doing just that. MWM’s film division is notable for producing pictures such as Nicholas Winding Refn’s neon-spiked noir Drive, as well as 21 Bridges, which stars the late Chadwick Boseman. Not so…

5 Min.
in-flight simulator

When we call up Hosni Auji, he’s just putting the finishing touches to a game that simulates a six-hour economy-class flight in real time. So we’re caught off guard when we ask how his debut got started, and he reveals he is – or was – an anxious flyer. “Generally, a week before I had to fly, I’d always read anything I could find online to calm myself down and reassure myself that flying is fine.” In that process, and from talking to people about their airborne experiences, he ended up with what he initially thought was “a useless bag of factoids,” albeit one that prompted a keen interest in civil aviation. As such, when Auji was tasked with developing a thesis project for a Masters programme at the NYU Game…

1 Min.
après slay

A booming tourism industry has sprung up around the 25 eponymous – and deeply magical – dungeons of Hinterberg, with adventurers from around the world drawn to the Austrian hills to fight their way through the challenge. Dungeons Of Hinterberg’s distinctive style, the work of Regina Resinger, is inspired by graphic novels and the art of Jon Juarez and Pierre-Abraham Rochat, while the visual effects take cues from animated movies like Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse. Microbird’s rendering pipeline converts normals into coloured lines, resulting in a style reminiscent of hand-drawn detail. “All our effects are aware of other objects on the screen and their materials, as well as how much light hits them, “programmer and designer Philipp Seifried says. “So we can apply halftone effects for specific materials and only…

2 Min.
soundbytes

“The big game showcases which have only been viewable this year virtually have meant I look forward to them like I do live-event, appointment-to-view TV.”“We’re supposed to paint this picture of nirvana; however, I just don’t think it’s nirvana. Nirvana is making great hits, and people will find them.”“After more than 30 years, I’ve decided to stop working on videogames and fully focus on my second passion: wildlife!”“Real change will take time. But I am determined to do everything in my power to ensure everyone at Ubisoft feels welcome, respected, and safe.” ARCADE WATCH Keeping an eye on the coin-op gaming scene Cabinet Astro City Mini Manufacturer Sega Alright, so it’s not exactly coin-op: you’d be hard-pressed to cram a quarter into this dinky thing. Nevertheless, the spirit of the arcade is very much present…