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Tech & Gaming
Edge

Edge October 2020

The authority on videogame art, design and play, Edge is the must-have companion for game industry professionals, aspiring game-makers and super-committed hobbyists. Its mission is to celebrate the best in interactive entertainment today and identify the most important developments of tomorrow, providing the most trusted, in-depth editorial in the business via unparalleled access to the developers and technologies that make videogames the world’s most dynamic form of entertainment.

Land:
United Kingdom
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Future Publishing Ltd
Erscheinungsweise:
Monthly
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13 Ausgaben

in dieser ausgabe

2 Min.
come on, you raver, you seer of visions

This year started out dark, and proceeded to get even darker. When the horizon looks indistinct, it’s the trailblazers that we need the most: those who are confident enough to charge ahead into the unknown, like a beacon, for the collective benefit of everybody following behind. Arthouse videogame festival A Maze Berlin has been doing exactly that for 12 years now. Set up to spotlight the kind of openly political games the mainstream industry wouldn’t touch with a ten-foot pole, over the years it’s become a staple community event. After the festival’s funding request was rejected last year, and a pandemic hit at the beginning of this one, any sensible organisation might have admitted defeat. Fortunately, A Maze is anything but sensible. In Knowledge this month, we talk to its founder…

10 Min.
flock together

We flutter through concrete, fluorescent-lit hallways and outside into a permanent golden hour. Above our heads, a gigantic flamingo looms, frozen forever in almost-flight. The bird has been the symbol of A Maze Berlin for a while now: founder Thorsten S. Wiedemann associates the brightly coloured animal with playfulness, provocation, and of course John Waters’ outrageous cult film Pink Flamingos. “The flamingo is a strong animal,” Wiedemann tells us. “It looks beautiful. They have this social aspect, gathering in herds, and also this kind of balance, you know?” The flamingo is everything he wants A Maze to be, and to champion in the videogames it showcases each year – contemporary, inventive and avant-garde. A Maze Total Digital, then, is perhaps the most flamingo-like the show has ever been. It’s a fully…

5 Min.
toy town

When it comes to island-building game Townscaper, it’s the little things. We plonk down colourful houses, and mathematical magic works to shape them into a place that looks lived-in. In one click, Townscaper creates a balcony with a tower viewer pointing out to sea. In another, we extend a cottage – and the game places a tiny pair of wellies outside the new front door. We rarely set out with a plan, instead following the game’s lead in search of fresh delights. Perhaps Townscaper is the latest in a line of what late Nintendo president Satoru Iwata once termed ‘non-games’: software toys without goal or end, often encouraging the player to invent their own through self-expression – the original SimCity, DS synthesiser Electroplankton, and Jeff Minter’s player-controlled light show Psychedelia among…

1 Min.
ghost in the machine

On the surface, it all looks so simple. “I’ve been working in this ‘clear line’ art style for over a decade, so it’s what comes naturally,” artist and illustrator Jean de Wet tells us. “Having said that, we’re definitely paying a nostalgic homage to the early ‘visually limited’ video and computer games from the ’80s.” But Haunted Garage has layers. It’s an adventure game set across multiple dimensions, where exploring one world summons unusual instruments to tinker with in another. “The contraptions are inspired by electronic musical devices from the ’70s,” de Wet says. “Analogue synthesisers and drum machines are an inspiration in terms of functionality and aesthetics – but always with a slightly humorous element.” Fiddle with buttons, knobs, switches and strings and you’ll find yourself creating a bespoke looping…

1 Min.
soundbytes

“It’s incredibly irresponsible for the Army and the Navy to be recruiting impressionable young people… via livestreaming platforms. War is not a game.” US Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez aims to prohibit the use of funds for recruiting via gaming platforms. Nobody tell her about World Of Tanks “I’m going to bring new eyes to their service, they’re going to bring new money to my bank account, and – I’m just kidding.” American rapper Logic retires from music, then signs a seven-figure exclusive streaming deal with Twitch. Not quite the Bahamas, is it, but it’ll do “Imagine a town that only allowed Target, and disallowed any other stores. That’s totally un-American and uncompetitive. That’s exactly what Apple does.” Given who’s running the country these days, Epic CEO Tim Sweeney, it honestly seems pretty American to us “I don’t…

1 Min.
arcade watch

Game Pengo! Online Manufacturer Sega Once the beating heart of the arcade experience, the idea of friends crowding around an arcade game is, for now, a thing of the past. To counter the need for arcade-goers to socially distance, manufacturers are adopting online multiplayer to allow players to compete with others on separate machines in arcades across the globe. Sega’s release this month of retro reboot Pengo! Online serves up not just nostalgia for a classic game, but goes some way towards sating our need for a good old-fashioned multiplayer experience. Pengo, released in 1982, was Sega’s first ‘mascot’ game and riffs on Pac-Man’s theme of a hero chased by monsters. The ice-blocks that form the game’s maze are pushed by the titular penguin to squash the chasing sno-bees, which can also…