Fine Cooking

February/March 2022 No.174

Fine Cooking offers knowledge and inspiration for passionate cooks. The November/December 2020 issue contains recipes featuring seasonal ingredients such as pomegranates, root vegetables, and cool-weather greens, plus easy weeknight dishes for a busy holiday season. Other special sections include three perfect turkeys for Thanksgiving—from a classic brined bird to an asado-style spatchcocked turkey, to soy-miso-glazed breasts—a classic Christmas menu, and a selection of beautiful maple desserts. Every issue of Fine Cooking includes numerous unique and delicious recipes as well as helpful tips and guidelines to ensure that each recipe you try at home turns out as beautiful and tasty as it appears in the magazine photos.

Land:
United States
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Meredith Operations Corporation
Erscheinungsweise:
Bimonthly
9,43 €(Inkl. MwSt.)
28,25 €(Inkl. MwSt.)
6 Ausgaben

in dieser ausgabe

3 Min
fine, redefined

What comes to mind when you think of fine dining? Pressed white linens? Silver-plated flatware? Cheese carts and uptight waiters in white gloves? While that may remain true in some places, there’s been a seismic shift in recent years in what we consider fine in the culinary world. And that’s something we’ve happily embraced. Here at Fine Cooking, our commitment to fine refers to quality—as in tried-and-tested recipes, foolproof techniques, and expert guidance. But stuffy? That’s not part of our equation. This issue we’re leaning into the kinds of dishes we deem more than fine—even if they might never pass some arbitrary fine dining test. Danielle Centoni invites us to explore schupfnudlen, finger-shape potato dumplings from Austria and southern Germany. Once you learn the basic blueprint, you’ll find a million ways to…

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2 Min
masthead

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Maggie Glisan DESIGN DIRECTOR Tempy Segrest PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR Paden Reich ART DIRECTOR Emily Johnson OPERATIONS EDITOR Diane Rose Keener CONTRIBUTING DRINKS EDITOR Jill Silverman Hough CONTRIBUTING COPY EDITOR Andrea Cooley CONTRIBUTING PROOFREADER Carrie Truesdell CONTRIBUTING WRITER Lisa Kingsley CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Ken Carlson, Waterbury Publications, Inc. CONTRIBUTING FOOD STYLIST Skyler Myers SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER Mark Josephson mark.josephson@meredith.com MEREDITH PREMIUM PUBLISHING EDITORIAL ADMINISTRATION EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Jill Waage EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR Michael D. Belknap ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR Jennifer Speer Ramundt BUSINESS MANAGER, EDITORIAL Cindy Slobaszewski LEAD BUSINESS OFFICE ASSISTANT Gabrielle Renslow DIRECTOR, MEREDITH FOOD STUDIOS Allison Long Lowery DIRECTOR, MEREDITH TEST KITCHEN Lynn Blanchard MEREDITH PREMIUM PUBLISHING SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT & GROUP PUBLISHER Scott Mortimer VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING Jeremy Biloon DIRECTOR, BRAND MARKETING Jean Kennedy BRAND MANAGER Kate Roncinske ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, BRAND MARKETING Bryan Christian SENIOR BRAND MANAGER Katherine Barnet ASSOCIATE BRAND MANAGER Samantha Lebofsky CONSUMER MARKETING MANAGER Laura Krogh ASSOCIATE BUSINESS DIRECTOR Jenna Bates BUSINESS MANAGER Lisa…

4 Min
in season

BOK CHOY The refreshing Asian vegetable with white spoon-shape stems and juicy dark leaves is at its peak just when you’re craving something light, fresh, and green. IT’S USED WIDELY in Chinese cooking, but bok choy (sometimes called Chinese cabbage) is versatile enough to shine in all sorts of cuisines. There are many varieties of this member of the brassica (cruciferous) family, including both dwarf (a.k.a baby) and mature varieties. All feature crisp, succulent stalks and tender leaves that are rich in nutrients that keep bones strong, such as calcium, vitamin K, and potassium. The vegetable is also extremely versatile. Shapely baby bok choy is perfect for halving and grilling, roasting, or steaming. And both baby and mature varieties make welcome additions to soups, salads, and stir-fries, or as a filling component…

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2 Min
the reading list

GOOD READS Three inspiring voices explore Black foodways through recipes, ingredients, stories, and art. BLACK FOOD by Bryant Terry, 4 Color Books; $40 You could call Black Food a cookbook. But it’s certainly not a cookbook in any traditional sense. Yes, there are recipes. But there are also essays, poetry, and art—even curated playlists—from an incredible chorus of diverse voices with varied experiences. It’s the kind of groundbreaking book that pushes American cookbook writing into genre-defying territory that is wholly unknown, incredibly exciting, and much overdue. Edited by Bryant Terry, a James Beard and NAACP Image Award-winning chef, educator, and author, the landmark release from 4 Color Books (a new imprint of Ten Speed Press launched in partnership with Bryant himself) is a communal testament to the shared culinary histories of the African diaspora: across…

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2 Min
soup time

Frozen Assets One of the things we love most about making soup is that so many can be made in big batches and frozen. Souper Cubes’ sturdy silicone trays, which feature 1- and 2-cup fill lines, help you do so in convenient portions. Once frozen, the cubes pop out easily for heating, or they can be transferred to space-saving freezer bags so you can enjoy an individual bowlful whenever you please. 2-Cup Tray, $36.99; soupercubes.com Going Dutch A cast-iron Dutch oven is without a doubt a kitchen essential—especially if you find yourself making soups and stews on the regular. Chantal’s new Enameled Cast Iron Dutch Oven doesn’t need to be seasoned and the scratch-resistant enamel surface creates deep browning in meats and vegetables for exceptional flavor. Marigold 7 Qt., $189.95; createmyplace.com Spot to Rest Food52’s…

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4 Min
repertoire

A CAKE THAT SINGS Hone your pastry skills with a showstopping cake worthy of a French pâtisserie. THERE IS MUCH DEBATE ABOUT how this cake—known as both Clichy and L’Opéra—came to be. Some culinary historians give credit to Louis Clichy, who debuted the cake at the 1903 Exposition Culinaire in Paris and later made it the signature dessert at his shop on the Boulevard Beaumarchais. Others, however, believe its claim to fame is a more modern phenomenon tracing its popularity to French pastry shop Dalloyau, whose version was created in honor of the Paris opera. But regardless of its origin story, the layered cake is the epitome of French elegance and sophistication. Opera cake is the sum of four components: a delicate almond sponge cake (called joconde in French) split into three elegant…

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