House Beautiful Feb/March 2021

The House Beautiful reader is someone whose home is her bedrock. She is always improving it because the process – and result – delights her. Happiness in her home comes from easy luxury and highly personal style. Her home is a gift to share with family and friends.

Land:
United States
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Hearst
Erscheinungsweise:
Monthly
4,70 €(Inkl. MwSt.)
38,09 €(Inkl. MwSt.)
10 Ausgaben

in dieser ausgabe

5 Min
open house

It’s fair to say we’re in the midst of a renovation boom—so Editorial Director Joanna Saltz chatted with experts across the country to better understand the highs…and lows. WANT TO TALK? E-MAIL ME AT EDITOR@HOUSEBEAUTIFUL.COM. Joanna Saltz: I’m hearing that it has never been more expensive to build than right now. What is going on? Kiley Baun: In Philadelphia we have a huge demand. I think there’s been more of an interest in design over the last couple of years and particularly since COVID-19. Dustin Ence: Our home costs for new construction have almost doubled in the last two to three years. In southern Utah, we’re getting a lot of people coming from cities and towns that have been under much more strenuous lockdown. We’re busier than ever. Jessica Pleasants: Not only is it more expensive…

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1 Min
find the right style

TRADITIONAL For historic (or historically inspired) homes like this brownstone designed by Paloma Contreras, windows with grids—strips of wood, metal, or another material used to visually divide the panes—are the classic choice. ARTS AND CRAFTS Organic and geometric, this style is full of quirky intricacies. Here, Paul Bertelli of JLF Architects incorporated reclaimed materials in an arched leaded glass window (another Arts and Crafts staple). CONTEMPORARY Large plate glass windows with few visual separations are a natural accompaniment for minimalist decor. They also allow a stunning view to take center stage, like in this apartment by designer Ahmad AbouZanat. MIDCENTURY MODERN Wall-spanning windows (and clerestory windows, above eye level along the roofline) provided ample light for the open floor plans of post-WWII homes. In this room by Madeline Stuart, wood emphasizes the landscape.…

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1 Min
what’s your type?

PALOMA CONTRERAS:BRITTANY AMBRIDGE/OTTO.AHMAD ABOUZANAT:NICHOLAS GLIMENAKIS.JLF ARCHITECTS:AUDREY HALL.MADELEINE STUART:TREVOR TONDRO/OTTO.KINGSTON LAFFERTY DESIGN: BARBARA CORSICO PHOTOGRAPHY. ILLUSTRATIONS: NICHOLAS SLATER…

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1 Min
should you replace yours?

1. Count the panes. Are there multiple layers of glass or just a single one? If it’s the latter, you might want to upgrade. “Double- and triple-paned glass will reduce energy consumption and cost,” says architect R D Gentzler. 2. Feel for a breeze. A drafty room means you’re spending more on heating and cooling, says Gentzler. One telltale sign is if your curtains move even when a window is closed (you can let your resident ghost off the hook for this one). 3. Check for rot. Bubbled, peeling paint and swollen wood that’s not flush with the wall point to signs of rot. If you’re not sure, a basic home inspection will clear things up. 4. Open it up. An obvious—but often overlooked—test: Simply see if the window is operable. If it’s difficult to open or…

1 Min
3 surprising ways to use skylights

Walk-in Closet: Picking out an outfit will be 100 percent more enjoyable when your floor mirror is awash in natural light (but still private). Kitchen Island: If you need task lighting, bright overhead lights will work, of course, but imagine prepping ingredients under crystal-clear sunshine! Home Office: For a private mood-and-productivity-boosting room, install a skylight right over your desk. Even at night, it’ll be inspiring: Look up to see stars in the sky. TREND FORECAST The old-school energy of stained glass contrasts perfectly with contemporary decor. It can also be a great problem-solver, providing privacy or hiding a less-than-stellar view while still letting in natural light, as in this home by Reath Design.…

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1 Min
shutter school

STANDARD These come in an array of different styles, from simple panels to slat-like louvers or rustic board-and-batten. Atlantic Architectural Raised Panel shutters, decorativeshutters.com BAHAMA Also called Bermuda shutters, these attach to the top of a window for extra protection from heavy tropical rains and wind. Standard Bermuda shutters, timberlane.com INTERIOR These block out light from inside the window, similar to blinds or curtains, but fold open like exterior shutters. NewStyle Hybrid shutters, hunterdouglas.com REATH DESIGN: LAURE JOLIET. IKE KLINGERMAN BARKLEY: ERIC PIASECKI/OTTO. JEANETTE WHITSON: SIMON WATSON.…

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