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Juno MagazineJuno Magazine

Juno Magazine Autumn 2018

JUNO combines investment and lifestyle in a beautiful luxury magazine. It’s an ideal gift for a beginner in the investing world through to the sophisticated investor. This colourful, quality publication explains financial concepts in plain English and offers in-depth market commentary from a team of experts. It’s all about simplified investing. This spring, JUNO looks at KiwiSaver, the investment most Kiwis already have. It could cost you big bucks if you’re paying too much in fees. Investment expert Mary Holm suggests ways to improve KiwiSaver, starting with 1% contributions. JUNO tells you why your ex could get your KiwiSaver. JUNO also goes on safari in Africa, reviews the new Porsche Cayenne and offers market analysis for the sophisticated investor.

Land:
New Zealand
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
JUNO
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IN DIESER AUSGABE

access_time2 Min.
meet our contributors

JOHN BERRY John has more than 20 years’ market experience in law firms and investment banks. He’s the former Head of Execution at Deutsche Bank Structured Capital Markets, Europe. ROD DRURY Rod is the founder and CEO of Xero, a cloud accounting platform with more than 1.2 million subscribers throughout Australia, New Zealand, the UK, North America, and Asia. AMY HAMILTON CHADWICK Amy specialises in property and finance journalism; she has been a writer and editor for almost 20 years. Amy is a former editor of NZ Property Investor magazine and is a Registered Financial Adviser. MARTIN HAWES Martin is the chairman of the Summer KiwiSaver Investment Committee. He is an Authorised Financial Adviser and offers his services throughout New Zealand. He also presents at seminars. BERNARD HICKEY Bernard Hickey is an independent economic commentator based in the Parliamentary…

access_time1 Min.
from the publisher

Investing Outside the Box “What’s the best way to double your money?” asked my 9-year-old son. I was about to explain how he could do this through investing, when he blurted out: “Put it in front of a mirror.” Very clever! Wouldn’t it be great if it was that easy to double our cash? As investors, we’re always looking for the next big thing that will bring instant returns. But the investing landscape is diverse – with many opportunities. So it can be a challenge, even for the seasoned investor, to decide where it’s best to put their money. Successful former hedge-fund manager turned artist, Michael Nock, relates a good investor to someone who draws on all manner of life experiences, allowing themselves a degree of lateral thinking, thinking outside the box, and thinking…

access_time2 Min.
from the editor

Ups and Downs A sudden drop in the markets always worries investors. And it doesn’t matter if the reasons for the downturn are irrational. Take the day in early February this year, when the US share market fell 5 per cent. At the same time as President Donald Trump was on television assuring the world that the US was in good shape, the markets were in decline. So it wasn’t the economy that caused the blip. The share market jitters could have been caused by other factors – rumours of rising interest rates, fear that higher wages would push up inflation, just a ‘correction’ as prices found their true value; or all of these. As investors, most of us don’t have the skills to predict a fall in share prices like the one in February.…

access_time1 Min.
a tale of two markets

The old and the new – the traditional stock market and a new market for trading real assets – were explained at the Summer JUNO Exchange reader seminar on 14 December. About 60 people attended, as well as those who joined us on our Facebook livestream, for the final JUNO event of 2017. Guests enjoyed drinks and canapés, as experts offered insights on investing, at the OMF offices in Britomart, Auckland. The event was introduced by JUNO Publisher and Editorial Director Jacqueline Taylor, who explained the magazine’s goal of improving Kiwis’ financial literacy. OMF Senior Dealer Kevin Morgan explained the current bull market is the longest in recent memory, and speculated on whether it’s here to stay, or whether signs suggested it was waning. Kiwi Wealth General Manager of Customer Product and Innovation Joe Bishop…

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what we like

FASHION OF THE FUTURE Colour, texture, technology, and imagination collide when emerging designers from around the world hit the catwalk for the iD Dunedin Fashion Week each year. The shows are a platform that’s launched the careers of many fashion designers. Judges have included global figures such as Emilia Wickstead, Paris-based Martin Grant and Lutz Huelle, US vintage fashion queen Doris Raymond, and the UK’s Hilary Alexander. For iD Dunedin 2018, 44 of the world’s top emerging fashion designers from 17 countries have been selected from a pool of almost 200 entries. The Emerging Designer shows will be at Dunedin Town Hall on Thursday 3 May and Friday 4 May, with the winners announced at a gala evening on the Friday night. Tickets from $80 from ticketmaster.co.nz idfashion.co.nz THE SUITE LIFE AT LA AIRPORT You can be a…

access_time5 Min.
investors vs speculators

There are only four true investments that should form the bedrock of any portfolio: shares, property, bonds, and cash. Most of the other things sometimes called ‘investments’ are usually, in fact, what I call speculation. There’s a yawning gulf between investment and speculation, and it’s important you understand the difference. Investments give a cash return that doesn’t come solely from a change in value. So, shares give you dividends; property gives you rent; bonds and cash give you interest. These returns (dividends, rent, and cash) are the primary focus of the investor – true investors buy for income first and let the capital gain follow along. Speculation is something different: speculators buy something hoping that they’ll profit from an increase in its value when they sell it. They buy, say, gold or oil…

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