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category_outlined / Männerzeitschriften
Men's JournalMen's Journal

Men's Journal December 2018

Geared toward the modern, adventurous man, Men's Journal magazine is for guys who enjoy their leisure time and want to get the most out of it. From health and fitness to sports and travel, each month Men's Journal has it covered.

Land:
United States
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
American Media Operations, Inc
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12 Ausgaben

IN DIESER AUSGABE

access_time1 Min.
letters

“While there are often good articles in your magazine, ‘The Pig Patrol’ [by J.R. Sullivan, October 2018] was disappointing. I assure you I am not alone in having no interest in the details about how some foulmouthed former strip-club owner murders hogs. And don’t assume that most of your readers want to read about such cruelty, because they do not.” R. CLIFTONASHBURN, VA LESS FILLING After reading about beers that taste like bread, coffee, and passion fruit [“The United States of Suds,” October 2018], you know what I’m really jonesing for? A cold Budweiser. JASON DUNWALDWILKES-BARRE, PA WILD AT RISK Reading about the preserves being protected [“The Wildest New Parks in the World,” by Mark Johanson, October 2018] gave me a serious case of wanderlust. But then came the United Nations report warning that global climate…

access_time2 Min.
letter from the editor

BOYS AND THEIR TOYS. It’s a subject near and dear—although I was admittedly off my game in 2018. I’ve been riding, gulp, the same bike (still love ya, Canyon Endurance!) since last August, and I recently crashed a drone I was testing into a tree (user error!). Luckily our team of experts picked up the slack, and this year’s “Gear of the Year” (page 68) is as eye-popping and expansive as ever. But what makes this iteration particularly special is how it fits our cover star. Jason Momoa is the epitome of boys who love their toys, and he’s about as much a “Men’s Journal guy” as we’ve ever featured. When Marissa Stephenson visited the Aquaman star’s home, she was treated to an intimate look at his personal trove of…

access_time4 Min.
northern exposure

ALASKAN FOG SHROUDED the mountains the morning Martin Chalk’s helicopter transport sped toward the most remote hotel in North America. “You’re surrounded by 20,000-foot peaks—you don’t expect to find any shelter out there,” says the New York–based beverage executive. “I was thinking, ‘Where the hell is this guy going to land?’ Then all of a sudden, out of the mist, this rocky outcrop appears.” Sitting atop that outcrop like a hood ornament is Sheldon Chalet, a five-room luxury lodge on Ruth Glacier, 10 miles from the 20,310-foot summit of Denali. A ring of mountaintops called the Don Sheldon Amphitheater encircles the chalet, like the stone crown of a giant king buried up to his head in snow. Taking it in for the first time, Chalk thought about wilderness photographer Galen Rowell’s…

access_time6 Min.
where the wild things are

IF YOU NEED ME, I’m on channel two.” That was the last thing our ranger, Dylan, said before tossing a beat-up walkie-talkie onto the front seat of the topless green Toyota Land Cruiser, grabbing his rifle, and heading off into the bush. My wife and I looked at each other nervously. First, Josie, the wildlife tracker who was our other guide, took off following some lion footprints, and now Dylan was gone, too. We were alone—with predators lurking. Our two kids, 10 and 12, didn’t seem to sense any danger. They were still wide-eyed, drinking it all in after being in our apartment in Brooklyn just 36 hours ago. Dylan emerged from the trees, 10 tense minutes later, his boyish face betraying little emotion. Josie followed, and without saying a word, they…

access_time4 Min.
bald-faced bliss

THE FIRST TIME I went to Baldface Lodge, 10 years ago, I had no idea what to expect. I’d skied at dozens of resorts and had been on several heli-ski trips, one of which involved first descents in Alaska’s Tordrillo range. Point being, I was lucky. I’d ridden lots of places. But after three days at Baldface, I was ready to commit my entire snowboarding future to this remote cat-skiing lodge in central British Columbia. To reach Baldface, you show up at a small airport in Nelson—a crunchy town that’s Canada’s version of Boulder, Colorado, only cheaper—and wait for a Bell 205 helicopter to take you on a 10-minute flight to the lodge, which sits in a clearing at 7,000 feet. Once there, you’re surrounded by 32,000 acres of untracked powder,…

access_time1 Min.
jasper

Jasper, population 5,000, is in the heart of 4,200-square-mile Jasper National Park, Canada’s largest. As a result, the town mostly caters to summer tourists, who come to explore the wide river valleys and high peaks when the wildflowers are in bloom. In winter, though, practically the only people left are locals and diehard skiers from Edmonton (four hours away), who flock to the low-key village to take advantage of the open runs and empty lifts at 1,720-acre Marmot Basin, the ski resort 15 minutes away. If you’re lucky, you’ll see wolf tracks crossing the road on the way to the resort. Or maybe, while boot-packing to the top of Marmot Peak, you’ll spot a herd of caribou off the backside of the mountain. This is to say: The resort—and the…

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