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National Geographic Little KidsNational Geographic Little Kids

National Geographic Little Kids July - August 2018

National Geographic Little Kids magazine - perfect for children ages 3 to 6. Irresistible photos and simple text to enhance early reading experiences, along with games, puzzles, and activities, that turn playtime into learning time.

Land:
United States
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
National Geographic Society
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IN DIESER AUSGABE

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dolphin talk

Bottlenose dolphins leap and swim in the ocean. They whistle, squeak, trill, and click to talk. A baby dolphin makes up a special whistle when it is about a year old. That whistle is its name. Bottlenose dolphins eat fish, shrimp, and squid. They live in groups with their friends and family. A dolphin uses its name to tell others who it is and where it is swimming. Baby dolphins babble to practice grown-up sounds, just like human babies. It might say something like, “Hi, my name is Splash. I am over here.” A baby dolphin is called a calf. Dolphins also use their bodies to talk. They slap their tails or f lippers on the water. Bottlenose dolphins can leap high out of the water. Sometimes they jump and belly f lop to make a loud splash. NOW SHOWING! DOLPHIN VIDEO natgeolittlekids.com/july DANITA…

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animal eggs

Which picture has the most eggs? How many of the eggs will hatch into birds? DAVID TIPLING / GETTY IMAGES (PENGUIN EGG); KEITH HOMAN / SHUTTERSTOCK (ROBIN EGGS); © CHRIS MATTISON / FLPA / MINDEN PICTURES (SNAKE EGGS); VISUALS UNLIMITED, INC. / ROBERT PICKETT / GETTY IMAGES (BUG EGGS); OPTIONM / SHUTTERSTOCK (FISH EGGS); CHRISTIAN MUSAT / SHUTTERSTOCK (BUG); LEVENT KONUK / SHUTTERSTOCK (FISH); MATT JEPPSON / SHUTTERSTOCK (SNAKE); © VLADIMIR SELIVERSTOV / DREAMSTIME (PENGUIN); BRIAN GUEST / SHUTTERSTOCK (ROBIN)…

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jumping servals

A serval hides quietly in the tall grass. It is waiting for food to come close enough to catch. The wild cat’s giant ears twist and turn to listen.When the serval hears a bird flying by, it jumps straight up. Servals also hunt squirrels, hares, mole rats, and insects. It snatches the food from the air with its sharp claws. Servals use their claws like hooks to catch frogs and fish. They can leap the length of a car. A serval’s long legs help it jump very high.A serval could even jump to the top of your refrigerator! OTHER CATS WITH SPOTS Meet some more spotted cats. JOE MCDONALD / GETTY IMAGES (IN GRASS); MARTIN HARVEY / GETTY IMAGES (JUMPING); YSBRANDCOSIJN / GETTY IMAGES (CLAWS). MARTIN HARVEY / GETTY IMAGES (FISHING); GERALD & BUFF CORSI / GETTY IMAGES (LEAPING);…

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raccoon!

A raccoon’s eyes help it see at night, when it looks for food. Its nose sniffs out foods like snails and fruit. It can even smell seeds in the ground. Raccoons use their front paws and long fingers to pick berries, lift things, or dig up worms. Its ears can hear very quiet noises, such as a mouse scurrying across the ground. The color of its fur makes a raccoon hard to see in the dark. That helps it surprise animals it wants to eat. Raccoons eat fruit, nuts, seeds, mice, bugs, frogs, and fish. Sharp claws help a raccoon climb trees to look for tasty bird eggs in nests. MOOSEHENDERSON / SHUTTERSTOCK (BIG PICTURE); © BLICKWINKEL / ALAMY (CLAWS)…

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wild cards

harvest mouse FUN FACTS The tiny harvest mouse weighs only about as much as a nickel. It is so light that it can climb up blades of grass. squid FUN FACTS Squids live in the ocean. A squid has two long tentacles it uses to catch food. Then it uses its eight arms to hold the food as it eats. blue peafowl FUN FACTS Male peafowl are called peacocks. Females are called peahens. A peacock has a big, beautiful tail he shows to attract peahens. cheetah FUN FACTS Cheetahs run faster than any other animal on land. They can run 65 miles an hour. That is as fast as a car drives on a highway. Eastern box turtle FUN FACTS A box turtle can pull its head, legs, and tail inside its hard shell. That protects it from enemies such as skunks and raccoons. Australian…

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hide-and-seek

Subscribe to NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LITTLE KIDS! Call TOLL FREE: 1 (800) 647-5463 TDD: 1 (800) 548-9797 Monday-Friday: 8 a.m.-Midnight ET, Saturday: 8:30 a.m.-7 p.m. ET natgeo.com/littlekids/subscribe Copyright © 2018 National Geographic Partners, LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction of the whole or any part of the contents of NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LITTLE KIDS without written permission is prohibited. NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LITTLE KIDS and Yellow Border: Registered Trademarks ® Marcas Registradas. Printed in the U.S.A.…

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