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Paint & Draw Watercolours

Paint & Draw Watercolours

Paint & Draw Watercolours

Painting has always been considered a relaxing activity, and this is certainly true with watercolours. As your brush sweeps over the paper, it’s impossible not to feel a sense of calm, and that’s what has drawn so many people to the medium. In Paint & Draw: Watercolours, it’s time to take this to the next level and improve your techniques. With tutorials on everything from colour theory to composing interesting scenes, it’s the perfect way to develop your skills while still having fun. Uncover how to create stunning fire effects, make the perfect harbour scene and fill in all of those minute details that will make your art really stand apart from the crowd. But the learning doesn’t stop there – explore how you can take yourself that one step further with ink, gouache, and line and wash. Finally, we reveal how you can mount, photograph and frame your own paintings.

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Land:
United Kingdom
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Future Publishing Ltd
Erscheinungsweise:
One-off
AUSGABE KAUFEN
6,80 €(Inkl. MwSt.)

in dieser ausgabe

1 Min.
welcome to paint & draw watercolours

Painting has always been considered a relaxing activity, and this is certainly true with watercolours. As your brush sweeps over the paper, it’s impossible not to feel a sense of calm, and that’s what has drawn so many people to the medium. In Paint & Draw: Watercolours, it’s time to take this to the next level and improve your techniques. With tutorials on everything from colour theory to composing interesting scenes, it’s the perfect way to develop your skills while still having fun. Uncover how to create stunning fire effects, make the perfect harbour scene and fill in all of those minute details that will make your art really stand apart from the crowd. But the learning doesn’t stop there – explore how you can take yourself that one step further with…

5 Min.
mastering the basics of watercolours

The fluidity, transparency and immediacy of watercolour allows the artist to interpret a wide variety of subject matter. Although challenging, especially for beginners, watercolours can be simplified by adopting a limited palette and choosing a subject with good ‘tonal contrast’. In the following snow scene demonstration, I followed the above criteria and worked from photographic reference, in conjunction with a ‘plein air’ oil painting. Working from a sketch – or even a painting in the final stages – helps to eliminate the often overwhelming detail in a photograph. About ROBERT Carlisle, Cumbria, England Robert aims to capture light and atmosphere in a contemporary impressionistic style. He tutors watercolour around the UK and abroad. www.robertbrindley.com 1 Draw and mask Using a 2B pencil, I drew out just enough of the image to enable me to apply the initial…

3 Min.
colour theory

Create a colour theory chart to improve your colour mixing GETTING TO GRIPS with colour theory can seem a little bit too much like learning maths or science. You may feel you just want to be creative and express yourself, not work out calculations. But colour theory is one of the fundamental things you need to learn in order to progress and grow as an artist. Read on to create a colour theory chart that will transform your creative life. About ROB LUNN Bath, UK Rob is a self-taught painter, and loves painting in oils. His influences are Vincent Van Gogh, Caravaggio and Ilya Repin. He has been teaching art workshops since 2012. www.roblunn.co.uk Follow these steps… 1 Your medium The following exercise can be completed with acrylic, oil or watercolour paints, but colouring pencils are best. Not…

2 Min.
tips & techniques

THERE are many things that contribute to the attractive and free nature of watercolour, but here we’ll concentrate on the simplest and most basic: how to apply the paint to the paper. I’ve found the easiest way to make the paint look happy on the paper is to touch the paper once. That is, I know how I want my picture to look straightaway, and don’t plan to do any over-painting. I avoid painting anywhere twice, until I have painted everything once. And I don’t correct as I go along either–I wait until the end, when it is easier to judge the passages that haven’t quite gone to plan. Remember, we are all trying to narrow the gap between our vision and the execution of our vision. About ANDREW PITT Suffolk, UK Andrew started…

2 Min.
paint vibrant petals in watercolour

FLOWERS are always lovely subjects to paint, but their complex petals can often be difficult to get right. By looking at the contrasting effects of highlights, midtones and shadows on a single petal, I will show you how to get a more realistic, tonal appearance with just a few techniques, and only three basic mixes on the palette. About JARNIE GODWIN London, UK Working as a botanical watercolour artist, tutor and blogger, Jarnie is known for her quirky compositions of imperfect subjects. www.sketchbooksquirrel.com WATCH THE VIDEO http://bit.ly/pad_petals Follow these steps… 1 First wash After laying a glaze of clean water, I drop in the lightest colour. While the glaze is still wet, I continue to build up the tone where I need to by adding more touches of paint several times. Lifting colour with a clean, damp brush…

2 Min.
paint spring foliage using a dry-brush watercolour technique

THIS PROCESS shows a method for depicting trees when you want your foliage and branches unified as one. It’s the effect we generally get when looking towards the light. You’ll see less ‘internal’ detail and variation of tone and colour. Things become silhouetted and it’s more the outside edges of shapes that define them. Follow these steps… 1 Paint the trunk It’s best to use either Rough or Not surface paper for this effect. Load a medium-sized brush with fairly thick paint, then begin the tree by squashing the brush against the paper firmly at the base of its ivy-covered trunk. Drag the brush quickly upwards along its length, so it leaves a mark that’s broken by the paper surface. 2 Branch out Using the tip of the brush, draw out some fine lines as…