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Gesundheit & Fitness
Prevention

Prevention July 2018

Prevention magazine gives you healthy solutions you can really live with. Every issue delivers the latest news and trends on health, food, and nutrition, family, fitness, and more!

Land:
United States
Sprache:
English
Verlag:
Hearst
Erscheinungsweise:
Monthly
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in dieser ausgabe

1 Min.
strong like mom

HERE’S A STORY I love to tell about strength (and humility): A couple of summers ago, my mom said to my husband and me, “What’s all this about planks? Everything I read these days is about planks! Can you show me how to do one?” So we dropped to the grass in her yard and huffed and puffed our way through about 30 seconds of planking. Then, ever the helpful daughter and son-in-law, we carefully instructed her on proper form and adjusted her position as she tried out the move. “Like this?” she asked. “Good going, Mom!” I said. But then she said, “That’s it?” without even a hitch in her breath, and my husband and I stared at each other, openmouthed, over the top of her straight back. We…

3 Min.
connect with us!

Q I love when you run your Healthy Packaged Food Awards, but when I brought the list to my grocery store, there were ones I couldn’t find! —Leslie Sanderson, Pomona, NY A Thanks for letting us know! Here are a couple that we’ve discovered since then that are easier to find and still fit our original healthy-eating criteria. For a mouthwatering yogurt that doubles as dessert, we love Siggi’s Icelandic-Style Skyr Strained Low-Fat 2% Yogurt in Vanilla & Cinnamon (it’s the ideal companion to a berry parfait). For pita-perfect hummus, try Hope Hummus—we can’t get enough of the Black Garlic flavor! Look for them at major retailers like Whole Foods and Target. FIND EXACTLY WHAT YOU NEED ON PREVENTION.COM Our site is easier than ever to navigate, and this summer, we’re unrolling guides to…

1 Min.
pulse

Squeaky-Clean Sweet Corn You probably prefer your summer produce without a side of pesticides, so consider bringing both your shopping list and the Environmental Working Group’s 2018 “Clean Fifteen” on your next grocery run. Each year, the EWG ranks the cleanest and dirtiest fruits and veggies you can buy, based on how much pesticide residue was detected in each when tested. This year, sweet corn snagged the No. 2 spot (behind avocados) on the clean list, with less than 2% of samples showing any detectable pesticides. And the dirtiest? Strawberries, with one-third of samples containing residue of 10 or more pesticides. (So wash the berries well: Mix a pinch of baking soda with water and rinse with a soft spray.) Research has linked chronic exposure to these chemicals with potential fertility,…

1 Min.
a new reason to up your vitamin d

Metabolic syndrome—a cluster of factors that raises your risk of heart disease and diabetes—affects roughly 34% of U.S. adults. But Brazilian researchers have found something that many of them share: low levels of vitamin D. In a recent study, 58% of participants (all female) with metabolic syndrome were vitamin D deficient. People are considered to have metabolic syndrome if they have at least three risk factors associated with it—waist circumference above 35 inches in women and 40 in men, high blood pressure, high fasting blood sugar, and abnormal levels of triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood) and high cholesterol. Researchers believe the sunshine vitamin somehow influences insulin secretion and sensitivity, which play a major role in development of all these conditions. If you have metabolic syndrome, consider talking…

1 Min.
the weight-cancer connection

Obesity raises your risk of certain cancers and may also influence when you might develop them. Now new research by Case Western Reserve University says that nine common cancers (many of which arise later in life) are striking people earlier than has been typical. In 2016, 1 in 10 new breast cancer cases and 1 in 4 new thyroid cancer cases appeared in adults 20-44; one study found that men who were overweight as teens were more likely to develop colon cancer by age 48. Obesity triggers DNA changes that increase cancer risk and alters metabolism and hormone levels to create a cancer-friendly environment. Weight loss may improve prognosis, but researchers say the damage can’t be reversed—so it’s important to try to keep the pounds from piling on in the…

1 Min.
extra pounds, dull taste?

Excess weight may do damage to a surprising body part: the tongue. Studies have found that putting on pounds can affect how people taste food by lowering their sensitivity to flavor. But new research in PLOS Biology suggests it may have an even bigger impact—obese mice actually had fewer taste buds than regular-weight ones. Scientists think the buildup of inflammation-triggering fatty tissue kills taste bud cells faster than they can regenerate. Researchers hope the findings will lead to new treatments for obese people struggling to taste. MORE THAN 1 IN 3 U.S. ADULTS ARE OBESE.…